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Calendar era

2017 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 2017
MMXVII
Ab urbe condita 2770
Armenian calendar 1466
ԹՎ ՌՆԿԶ
Assyrian calendar 6767
Bahá'í calendar 173–174
Bengali calendar 1424
Berber calendar 2967
British Regnal year 65 Eliz. 2 – 66 Eliz. 2
Buddhist calendar 2561
Burmese calendar 1379
Byzantine calendar 7525–7526
Chinese calendar 丙申(Fire Monkey)
4713 or 4653
    — to —
丁酉年 (Fire Rooster)
4714 or 4654
Coptic calendar 1733–1734
Discordian calendar 3183
Ethiopian calendar 2009–2010
Hebrew calendar 5777–5778
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 2073–2074
 - Shaka Samvat 1938–1939
 - Kali Yuga 5117–5118
Holocene calendar 12017
Igbo calendar 1017–1018
Iranian calendar 1395–1396
Islamic calendar 1438–1439
Japanese calendar Heisei 29
(平成29年)
Javanese calendar 1950–1951
Juche calendar 106
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 13 days
Korean calendar 4350
Minguo calendar ROC 106
民國106年
Nanakshahi calendar 549
Thai solar calendar 2560
Unix time 1483228800 – 1514764799

A calendar era is the year numbering system used by a calendar. For example, the Gregorian calendar numbers its years in the Western Christian era (the Coptic and Ethiopic churches have their own Christian eras, see below). The instant, date, or year from which time is marked is called the epoch of the era. There are many different calendar eras.

In antiquity, regnal years were counted from the ascension of a monarch. This makes the Chronology of the ancient Near East very difficult to reconstruct, based on disparate and scattered king lists, such as the Sumerian King List or the Babylonian Canon of Kings. In East Asia, reckoning by era names chosen by ruling monarchs ceased in the 20th century except for Japan, where they are still used.

For over a thousand years, ancient Assyria used a system of eponyms to identify each year. Each year at the Akitu festival (celebrating the Mesopotamian new year), one of a small group of high officials (including the king in later periods) would be chosen by lot to serve as the limmu for the year, which meant that he would preside over the Akitu festival and the year would bear his name. The earliest attested limmu eponyms are from the Assyrian trading colony at Karum Kanesh in Anatolia, dating to the very beginning of the 2nd Millennium BC, and they continued in use until the end of the Neo-Assyrian Period, ca. 612 BC.

Assyrian scribes compiled limmu lists, including an unbroken sequence of almost 250 eponyms from the early 1st Millennium BC. This has been an invaluable chronological aid, because a solar eclipse was recorded as having taken place in the limmu of Bur-Sagale, governor of Guzana. Astronomers have identified this eclipse as one that took place on 15 June, 763 BC, which has allowed absolute dates of 892 to 648 BC to be assigned to that sequence eponyms. This list of absolute dates has allowed many of the events of the Neo-Assyrian Period to be dated to a specific year, avoiding the chronological debates that characterize earlier periods of Mesopotamian history.


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Wikipedia

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