*** Welcome to piglix ***

* * * * *    piglix project (code-name) Launch Promotions    * * * * *

  • Learn more! ! if you are a bone fide Higher Education establishment and would like to learn how the piglix project may be your answer to the challenges of 'lecture room' replacement strategies, use our feedback page now to tell us about your needs and have someone contact you to explain your options and possibilities.

Indian national calendar


The Indian national calendar, sometimes called the Saka calendar, is the official civil calendar in use in India along with the Vikram Samvat calendar. It is used, alongside the Gregorian calendar, by The Gazette of India, in news broadcasts by All India Radio and in calendars and communications issued by the Government of India. The Saka calendar is also used in Java and Bali among Indonesian Hindus. Nyepi, the "Day of Silence", is a celebration of the Saka new year in Bali. Nepal's Nepal Sambat evolved from the Saka calendar.

The term may also ambiguously refer to the Hindu calendar; the Saka era is also commonly used by other calendars.

The calendar months follow the signs of the tropical zodiac rather than the sidereal zodiac normally used with Hindu calendar.

In leap years, Chaitra has 31 days and starts on March 21 instead. The months in the first half of the year all have 31 days, to take into account the slower movement of the sun across the ecliptic at this time.

The names of the months are derived from older, Hindu lunisolar calendars, so variations in spelling exist, and there is a possible source of confusion as to what calendar a date belongs to.

Years are counted in the Saka Era, which starts its year 0 in the year 78 of the Common Era. To determine leap years, add 78 to the Saka year - if the result is a leap year in the Gregorian calendar, then the Saka year is a leap year as well. Its structure is like the Persian calendar.


...
Wikipedia

Social Distancing Order In Force!

Don't forget! that your welfare and that of all your friends and colleagues here is of primary concern and a distance of six feet (1.8m) minimum is required at all times.

...