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Chicago Tribune

Chicago Tribune
Chicago Tribune Logo.svg
Chicagotribunejune162009.png
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner(s) tronc, Inc.
Founder(s) James Kelly, John E. Wheeler and Joseph K. C. Forrest
Publisher Bruce Dold
Editor Bruce Dold
Associate editor Colin McMahon
Managing editors Peter Kendall
Director of Interactive Bill Adee (VP for Digital Development and Operations, Tribune Media Group)
Opinion editor R. Bruce Dold
Sports editor Joe Knowles
Founded June 10, 1847; 169 years ago (1847-06-10)
Language English
Headquarters Tribune Tower
435 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
USA
Country United States
Circulation 448,930 daily
331,190 Saturday
853,324 Sunday
ISSN 1085-6706
OCLC number 60639020
Website chicagotribune.com

The Chicago Tribune is a daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, United States, owned by tronc, Inc., formerly Tribune Publishing. Founded in 1847, and formerly self-styled as the "World's Greatest Newspaper" (for which WGN radio and television are named), it remains the most-read daily newspaper of the Chicago metropolitan area and the Great Lakes region and is currently the eighth largest newspaper in the United States by circulation (and became the second largest under Tribune's ownership after the Chicago Tribune's parent company purchased the Los Angeles Times).

Traditionally published as a broadsheet, on January 13, 2009, the Tribune announced it would continue publishing as a broadsheet for home delivery, but would publish in tabloid format for newsstand, news box and commuter station sales. The move, however, proved to be unpopular with readers and in August 2011, the Tribune discontinued the tabloid edition, returning to its traditional broadsheet edition through all distribution channels.

The Tribune's masthead is notable for displaying the American flag, in reference to the paper's motto, "An American Paper for Americans," which is no longer displayed on the masthead, where it was below the flag.

The Tribune was founded by James Kelly, John E. Wheeler and Joseph K. C. Forrest, publishing its first edition on June 10, 1847. The paper saw numerous changes in ownership and editorship over the next eight years. Initially, the Tribune was not politically affiliated but tended to support either the Whig or Free Soil parties against the Democrats in elections. By late 1853, it was frequently running xenophobic editorials that criticized foreigners and Roman Catholics. About this time it also became a strong proponent of temperance. However nativist its editorials may have been, it was not until February 10, 1855 that the Tribune formally affiliated itself with the nativist American or Know Nothing party, whose candidate Levi Boone was elected Mayor of Chicago the following month.



The Chicago Tribune believes in the traditional principles of limited government; maximum individual responsibility; minimum restriction of personal liberty, opportunity and enterprise. It believes in free markets, free will and freedom of expression. These principles, while traditionally conservative, are guidelines and not reflexive dogmas.
The Tribune brings a Midwestern sensibility to public debate. It is suspicious of untested ideas.
The Tribune places great emphasis on the integrity of government and the private institutions that play a significant role in society. The newspaper does this in the belief that the people cannot consent to be governed unless they have knowledge of, and faith in, the leaders and operations of government. The Tribune embraces the diversity of people and perspectives in its community. It is dedicated to the future of the Chicago region.
  • In December 2005, the Tribune eliminated 28 editorial positions through a combination of buyouts and layoffs, including what were believed to be the first layoffs in the paper's history. Among the reporters who left the paper in that round were Carol Kleiman, Bill Jauss and Connie Lauerman.
  • In June 2007, about 25 newsroom employees took buyouts, including well-known bylines like Charles Madigan, Michael Hirsley and Ronald Kotulak, along with noted photographer Pete Souza.
  • In March 2008, the paper gave buyouts to about 25 newsroom employees, including sportswriter Sam Smith.
  • On August 15, 2008, the Tribune laid-off more than 40 newsroom and other editorial employees, including reporters Rick Popely, Ray Quintanilla, Lew Freedman, Michael Martinez and Robert Manor.
  • Also in August 2008, about 36 editorial employees took voluntary buyouts or resigned, including well-known bylines like Michael Tackett, Ron Silverman, Timothy McNulty, Ed Sherman, Evan Osnos, Steve Franklin, Maurice Possley, Hanke Gratteau, Chuck Osgood and Skip Myslenski.
  • On November 12, 2008, five editorial employees in the paper's Washington, D.C. bureau were laid off, including John Crewdson.
  • On December 4, 2008, about 11 newsroom employees were laid-off, with one sports columnist, Mike Downey, having departed several weeks earlier when his contract was not renewed. Well-known bylines who were laid off included Neil Milbert, Stevenson Swanson, Lisa Anderson, Phil Marty, Charles Storch, Courtney Flynn and Deborah Horan.
  • In February 2009, the Tribune laid off about 20 editorial employees, including several foreign correspondents, and some feature reporters and editors, although several, including Charles Leroux and Jeff Lyon, technically took buyouts. Among those who were let go were reporters Emily Nunn, Susan Chandler, Christine Spolar and Joel Greenberg.
  • On April 22, 2009, the paper laid off 53 newsroom employees, including well-known bylines like Patrick Reardon, Melissa Isaacson, Russell Working, Jo Napolitano, Susan Diesenhouse, Beth Botts, Lou Carlozo, Jessica Reaves, Tom Hundley, Alan Artner, Eric Benderoff, James P. Miller, Bob Sakamoto, Terry Bannon and John Mullin. That number was less than the 90 newsroom jobs that Crain's Chicago Business previously had reported were to be eliminated.
  • Keefe, Thomas M. (1971). "Chicago's Flirtation With Political Nativism". Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia. 82: 131–158 
  • Keefe, Thomas M. (1975). "The Catholic Issue in the Chicago Tribune Before the Civil War". Mid-America. Loyola University. 57 (4): 227–245 
  • Mayer, Gordon. "Party Rags? Politics and the News Business in Chicago's Party Press, 1831-71." Journalism History 32#3 (2006): 138+
  • McKinney, Megan. The Magnificent Medills: America's Royal Family of Journalism During a Century of Turbulent Splendor (Harper Collins, 2011)
  • Smith, Richard Norton. The Colonel: The Life and Legend of Robert R. McCormick, 1880-1955 (2003).
  • Wendt, Lloyd (1979). Chicago Tribune: The Rise of a Great American Newspaper. Chicago: Rand McNally. ISBN . 
  • Ziv, Nina. "The Chicagotribune. com: Creating a Newspaper for the New Economy" jn Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases (2002). online
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