Don't miss the piglix.com special BONUS offer during our Beta-test period. The next 100 new Registered Users (from a unique IP address), to post at least five (5) piglix, will receive 1,000 extra sign-up points (eventually exchangeable for crypto-currency)!

* * * * *    Free piglix.com Launch Promotions    * * * * *

  • Free Ads! if you are a small business with annual revenues of less than $1M - piglix.com will place your ads free of charge for up to one year! ... read more

  • $2,000 in free prizes! piglix.com is giving away ten (10) Meccano Erector sets, retail at $200 each, that build a motorized Ferris Wheel (or one of 22 other models) ... see details

Boethius

Anicius Manlius Severinus Boëthius
Boethius initial consolation philosophy.jpg
Boethius teaching his students
(initial in a 1385 Italian manuscript of the Consolation of Philosophy.)
Born AD 480
Rome, Kingdom of Odoacer
Died AD 524 (age about 44)
Pavia, Ostrogothic Kingdom
Notable work The Consolation of Philosophy
Era Late Antiquity
Region Northern Italy
School Neoplatonism
Main interests
problem of universals, theology, music
Notable ideas
The Wheel of Fortune
Saint Severinus Boethius
Born Rome, Kingdom of Odoacer
Died Pavia, Ostrogothic Kingdom
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church, Orthodox Church
Major shrine San Pietro in Ciel d'Oro, Pavia, Italy
Feast 23 October
Influences Augustine of Hippo
Influenced Thomas Aquinas

Anicius Manlius Severinus Boëthius, commonly called Boethius (English: /bˈθiəs/; also Boetius /bˈʃəs/; c. 480–524 AD), was a Roman senator, consul, magister officiorum, and philosopher of the early 6th century. He was born four years after Odoacer deposed the last Roman Emperor and declared himself King of Italy, and entered public service under Ostrogothic King Theodoric the Great, who later imprisoned and executed him in 524 on charges of conspiracy to overthrow him. While jailed, Boethius composed his Consolation of Philosophy, a philosophical treatise on fortune, death, and other issues, which became one of the most popular and influential works of the Middle Ages.

Boethius was born in Rome to a patrician family around 480 AD, but his exact birth date is unknown. His family, the Anicii, included emperors Petronius Maximus and Olybrius and many consuls. His father, Manlius Boethius, who was appointed consul in 487, died while Boethius was young. Another patrician, Quintus Aurelius Memmius Symmachus, adopted and raised Boethius, instilling in him a love for literature and philosophy. Both Memmius Symmachus and Boethius were fluent in Greek, an increasingly rare skill at the time in the Western Empire; for this reason, some scholars believe that Boethius was educated in the East. According to John Moorhead, the traditional view is that Boethius studied in Athens based on Cassiodorus's rhetoric describing Boethius' learning in one of his letters, but this appears to be a misreading and his studying in Athens is more likely a legend. The French scholar Pierre Courcelle has argued that Boethius studied at Alexandria with the Neo-Platonist philosopher Ammonius Hermiae. However, Moorhead observes that the evidence supporting Boethius having studied in Alexandria "is not as strong as it may appear", and adds that Boethius may have been able to acquire his formidable learning without travelling.


Preceded by
Flavius Inportunus
(alone)
Consul of the Roman Empire
510
Succeeded by
Arcadius Placidus Magnus Felix,
Flavius Secundinus

Mathematical works
Logical Works
A) Translations
B) Commentaries
Original Treatises
  • De arithmetica (On Arithmetic, c. 500) adapted translation of the Introductionis Arithmeticae by Nicomachus of Gerasa (c. 160 – c. 220).
  • De musica (On Music, c. 510), based on a lost work by Nicomachus of Gerasa and on Ptolemy's Harmonica.
  • Possibly a treatise on geometry, extant only in fragments.
  • In Isagogen Porphyrii commenta (two commentaries, the first based on a translation by Marius Victorinus, (c. 504-5059); the second based on Boethius' own translation (507–509).
  • In Categorias Aristotelis (c. 509–511)
  • In librum Aristotelis de interpretatione Commentaria minora (not before 513)
  • In librum Aristotelis de interpretatione Commentaria majora (c. 515–16)
  • In Aristotelis Analytica Priora (c. 520–23)
  • Commentaria in Topica Ciceronis (incomplete: the end the sixth book and the seventh are missing)
  • De divisione (515–520?)
  • De syllogismo cathegorico (505–506)
  • Introductio ad syllogismos cathegoricos (c. 523)
  • De hypotheticis syllogismis (516–522)
  • De topicis differentiis (c. 522–23)
  • Opuscola Sacra (Theological Treatises)
    • De Trinitate (c. 520–21)
    • Utrum Pater et Filius et Spiritus Sanctus de divinitate substantialiter praedicentur (Whether Father and Son and Holy Spirit are Substantially Predicated of the Divinity)
    • Quomodo substantiae in eo quod sint bonae sint cum non sint substantialia bona [also known as De hebdomadibus] (How Substances are Good in that they Exist, when They are not Substantially Good)
    • De fide Catholica
    • Contra Eutychen et Nestorium (Against Eutyches and Nestorius)
  • De consolatione Philosophiae (524–525).
  • De Trinitate (c. 520–21)
  • Utrum Pater et Filius et Spiritus Sanctus de divinitate substantialiter praedicentur (Whether Father and Son and Holy Spirit are Substantially Predicated of the Divinity)
  • Quomodo substantiae in eo quod sint bonae sint cum non sint substantialia bona [also known as De hebdomadibus] (How Substances are Good in that they Exist, when They are not Substantially Good)
  • De fide Catholica
  • Contra Eutychen et Nestorium (Against Eutyches and Nestorius)
  • Musica mundana — music of the spheres/world
  • Musica humana — harmony of human body and spiritual harmony
  • Musica instrumentalis — instrumental music
  • De Trinitate – "The Trinity", where he defends the Council of Chalcedon Trinitarian position, that God is in three persons who have no differences in nature. He argues against the Arian view of the nature of God, which put him at odds with the faith of Arian King of Italy.
  • Utrum Pater et filius et Spiritus Sanctus de divinitale substantialiter praedicentur – "Whether Father, Son and Holy Spirit are Substantially Predicated of the Divinity," A short work where he uses reason and Aristotelian epistemology to argue that the Catholic faiths' views of the nature of God are correct.
  • Quomodo substantiae
  • De fide catholica - On the Catholic Faith
  • Contra Eutychen et Nestorium – "Against Eutyches and Nestorius," from around 513, which dates it as the earliest of his theological works. Eutyches and Nestorius were contemporaries from the early to mid-5th century who held divergent Christological theologies. Boethius argues for a middle ground in conformity with Roman Catholic faith.
  • Attwater, Donald; Catherine Rachel John (1995). The Penguin Dictionary of Saints. London: Penguin Books. ISBN . OCLC 34361179. 
  • Baird, Forrest E.; Walter Kaufmann (2008). From Plato to Derrida. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. ISBN . 
  • Chadwick, Henry (1981). Boethius, the Consolations of Music, Logic, Theology, and Philosophy. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN . OCLC 8533668. 
  • Colish, Marcia L. (2002). Medieval Foundations of the Western Intellectual Tradition, 400-1400. New Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN . OCLC 185694056. 
  • Magee, John (1989). Boethius on Signification and Mind. Leiden: Brill. ISBN . 
  • Marenbon, John (2004). Boethius. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN . OCLC 186379876. 
  • Marenbon, John (2009). The Cambridge Companion to Boethius. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN . 
  • Suto, Taki (2011). Boethius on Mind, Grammar and Logic. A Study of Boethius' Commentaries on Peri Hermeneias. Cambridge: Brill. ISBN . 
  • Westfall, Joseph (2008). "Boethius: Kierkegaard and The Consolation". In Stewart, Jon. Kierkegaard and the Patristic and Medieval Traditions. Ashgate. pp. 207–222. ISBN . 
...
Wikipedia

1,000 EXTRA POINTS!

Don't forget! that as one of our early users, you are eligible to receive the 1,000 point bonus as soon as you have created five (5) acceptable piglix.

...