*** Notice at top for first time visitors ***

* * * * *    piglix project (code-name) Launch Promotions    * * * * *

  • Learn more! ! if you are a bone fide Higher Education establishment and would like to learn how the piglix project may be your answer to the challenges of 'lecture room' replacement strategies, use our feedback page now to tell us about your needs and have someone contact you to explain your options and possibilities.

Erosion


In earth science, erosion is the action of surface processes (such as water flow or wind) that remove soil, rock, or dissolved material from one location on the Earth's crust, then transport it away to another location. The particulate breakdown of rock or soil into clastic sediment is referred to as physical or mechanical erosion; this contrasts with chemical erosion, where soil or rock material is removed from an area by its dissolving into a solvent (typically water), followed by the flow away of that solution. Eroded sediment or solutes may be transported just a few millimetres, or for thousands of kilometres.

Natural rates of erosion are controlled by the action of geomorphic drivers, such as rainfall; bedrock wear in rivers; coastal erosion by the sea and waves; glacial plucking, abrasion, and scour; areal flooding; wind abrasion; groundwater processes; and mass movement processes in steep landscapes like landslides and debris flows. The rates at which such processes act control how fast a surface is eroded. Typically, physical erosion proceeds fastest on steeply sloping surfaces, and rates may also be sensitive to some climatically-controlled properties including amounts of water supplied (e.g., by rain), storminess, wind speed, wave fetch, or atmospheric temperature (especially for some ice-related processes). Feedbacks are also possible between rates of erosion and the amount of eroded material that is already carried by, for example, a river or glacier. Processes of erosion that produce sediment or solutes from a place contrast with those of deposition, which control the arrival and emplacement of material at a new location.


...
Wikipedia

Social Distancing Order In Force!

Don't forget! that your welfare and that of all your friends and colleagues here is of primary concern and a distance of six feet (1.8m) minimum is required at all times.

...