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Dada


Dada (/ˈdɑːdɑː/) or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde in the early 20th century, with early centers in Zürich, Switzerland at the Cabaret Voltaire (circa 1916) and in New York (circa 1915). Developed in reaction to World War I, the Dada movement consisted of artists who rejected the logic, reason, and aestheticism of modern capitalist society, instead expressing nonsense, irrationality, and anti-bourgeois protest in their works. The art of the movement spanned visual, literary, and sound media, including collage, sound poetry, cut-up writing, and sculpture. Dadaist artists expressed their discontent with violence, war, and nationalism, and maintained political affinities with the radical left.

The roots of Dada lay in pre-war avant-garde. The term anti-art, a precursor to Dada, was coined by Marcel Duchamp around 1913 to characterize works which challenge accepted definitions of art.Cubism and the development of collage and abstract art would inform the movement's detachment from the constraints of reality and convention. The work of French poets, Italian Futurists and the German Expressionists would influence Dada's rejection of the tight correlation between words and meaning. Works such as Ubu Roi (1896) by Alfred Jarry, and the ballet Parade (1916–17) by Erik Satie would also be characterized as proto-Dadaist works. The Dada movement's principles were first collected in Hugo Ball's in 1916.



  • The Dada Almanac, ed Richard Huelsenbeck [1920], re-edited and translated by Malcolm Green et al., Atlas Press, with texts by Hans Arp, Johannes Baader, Hugo Ball, Paul Citröen, Paul Dermée, Daimonides, Max Goth, John Heartfield, Raoul Hausmann, Richard Huelsenbeck, Vincente Huidobro, Mario D'Arezzo, Adon Lacroix, Walter Mehring, Francis Picabia, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, Alexander Sesqui, Philippe Soupault, Tristan Tzara.
  • Blago Bung, Blago Bung, Hugo Ball's Tenderenda, Richard Huelsenbeck's Fantastic Prayers, & Walter Serner's Last Loosening – three key texts of Zurich ur-Dada. Translated and introduced by Malcolm Green. Atlas Press,
  • Ball, Hugo. Flight Out Of Time (University of California Press: Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1996)
  • Jones, Dafydd W. Dada 1916 In Theory: Practices of Critical Resistance (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2014).
  • Biro, M. The Dada Cyborg: Visions of the New Human in Weimar Berlin. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2009.
  • Dachy, Marc. Journal du mouvement Dada 1915–1923, Genève, Albert Skira, 1989 (Grand Prix du Livre d'Art, 1990)
  • Dada & les dadaïsmes, Paris, Gallimard, Folio Essais, n° 257, 1994.
  • Jovanov, Jasna. Demistifikacija apokrifa: Dadaizam na jugoslovenskim prostorima, Novi Sad/Apostrof 1999.
  • Dada, la révolte de l'art, Paris, Gallimard / Centre Pompidou, Découvertes n° 476, 2005.
  • Archives Dada / Chronique, Paris, Hazan, 2005.
  • Dada, catalogue d'exposition, Centre Pompidou, 2005.
  • Durozoi, Gérard. Dada et les arts rebelles, Paris, Hazan, Guide des Arts, 2005
  • Gammel, Irene. Baroness Elsa: Gender, Dada and Everyday Modernity. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2002.
  • Hoffman, Irene. Documents of Dada and Surrealism: Dada and Surrealist Journals in the Mary Reynolds Collection, Ryerson and Burnham Libraries, The Art Institute of Chicago.
  • Huelsenbeck, Richard. Memoirs of a Dada Drummer, (University of California Press: Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1991)
  • Jones, Dafydd. Dada Culture (New York and Amsterdam: Rodopi Verlag, 2006)
  • Lavin, Maud. Cut With the Kitchen Knife: The Weimar Photomontages of Hannah Höch. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1993.
  • Lemoine, Serge. Dada, Paris, Hazan, coll. L'Essentiel.
  • Lista, Giovanni. Dada libertin & libertaire, Paris, L'insolite, 2005.
  • Melzer, Annabelle. 1976. Dada and Surrealist Performance. PAJ Books ser. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins UP, 1994. .
  • Novero, Cecilia. "Antidiets of the Avant-Garde: From Futurist Cooking to Eat Art." (University of Minnesota Press, 2010)
  • Richter, Hans. Dada: Art and Anti-Art (London: Thames and Hudson, 1965)
  • Sanouillet, Michel. Dada à Paris, Paris, Jean-Jacques Pauvert, 1965, Flammarion, 1993, CNRS, 2005
  • Sanouillet, Michel. Dada in Paris, Cambridge, Massachusetts, The MIT Press, 2009
  • Schippers, K. Holland Dada, Amsterdam, Em. Querido, 1974
  • Schneede, Uwe M. George Grosz, His life and work (New York: Universe Books, 1979)
  • Verdier, Aurélie. L'ABCdaire de Dada, Paris, Flammarion, 2005.
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