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Bletchley Park

Bletchley Park
Bletchley Park Mansion.jpg
The Mansion in 2017
BletchleyPark is located in England
BletchleyPark
Bletchley
Park
Location in England
Established 1938 (as a code-breaking centre); 1993 (as a museum)
Location Bletchley, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom
Coordinates 51°59′47″N 0°44′34″W / 51.9965°N 0.7428°W / 51.9965; -0.7428Coordinates: 51°59′47″N 0°44′34″W / 51.9965°N 0.7428°W / 51.9965; -0.7428
Director Iain Standen
Public transit access Bletchley railway station
Website www.bletchleypark.org.uk

Bletchley Park was the central site for British codebreakers during World War II. Run by the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS), it regularly penetrated the secret communications of the Axis Powers – most importantly the German Enigma and Lorenz ciphers. The official historian of World War II British Intelligence has written that the "Ultra" intelligence produced at Bletchley shortened the war by two to four years, and that without it the outcome of the war would have been uncertain.

Located in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England UK, Bletchley Park is now a flourishing heritage attraction, receiving hundreds of thousands of visitors annually. Open seven days a week, it is popular with individuals and families, as well as school groups and tour parties.

Bletchley Park is opposite Bletchley railway station. It is close to junctions 13 and 14 of the M1. Located 50 miles (80 km) northwest of London, the site appears in the Domesday Book as part of the Manor of Eaton. Browne Willis built a mansion there in 1711, but after Thomas Harrison purchased the property in 1793 this was pulled down. It was first known as Bletchley Park after its purchase by Samuel Lipscomb Seckham in 1877. The estate of 581 acres (235 ha) was bought in 1883 by Sir Herbert Samuel Leon, who expanded the then-existing farmhouse into the present "maudlin and monstrous pile" combining Victorian Gothic, Tudor, and Dutch Baroque styles.



  • Hut 1: The first hut, built in 1939 used to house the Wireless Station for a short time, later administrative functions such as transport, typing, and Bombe maintenance. The first Bombe, "Victory", was initially housed here.
  • Hut 2: A recreational hut for "beer, tea, and relaxation".
  • Hut 3: Intelligence: translation and analysis of Army and Air Force decrypts
  • Hut 4: Naval intelligence: analysis of Naval Enigma and Hagelin decrypts
  • Hut 5: Military intelligence including Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese ciphers and German police codes.
  • Hut 6: Cryptanalysis of Army and Air Force Enigma
  • Hut 7: Cryptanalysis of Japanese naval codes and intelligence.
  • Hut 8: Cryptanalysis of Naval Enigma.
  • Hut 9: ISOS (Intelligence Section Oliver Strachey).
  • Hut 10: Secret Intelligence Service (SIS or MI6) codes, Air and Meteorological sections.
  • Hut 11: Bombe building.
  • Hut 14: Communications centre.
  • Hut 15: SIXTA (Signals Intelligence and Traffic Analysis).
  • Hut 16: ISK (Intelligence Service Knox) Abwehr ciphers.
  • Hut 18: ISOS (Intelligence Section Oliver Strachey).
  • Hut 23: Primarily used to house the engineering department. After February 1943, Hut 3 was renamed Hut 23.
  • Block A: Naval Intelligence.
  • Block B: Italian Air and Naval, and Japanese code breaking.
  • Block C: Stored the substantial punch-card index.
  • Block D: Enigma work, extending that in huts 3, 6, and 8.
  • Block E: Incoming and outgoing Radio Transmission and TypeX.
  • Block F: Included the Newmanry and Testery, and Japanese Military Air Section. It has since been demolished.
  • Block G: Traffic analysis and deception operations.
  • Block H: Tunny and Colossus (now The National Museum of Computing).
  • Block C Visitor Centre
    • Secrets Revealed introduction
    • The Road to Bletchley Park. Codebreaking in World War One.
    • Intel Security Cybersecurity exhibition. Online security and privacy in the 21st Century.
  • Block B
    • Operational Bombe Rebuild
    • Lorenz Cipher
    • Alan Turing
    • Enigma machines
    • Japanese codes
    • Home Front exhibition. How people lived in WW2
  • The Mansion
    • Office of Alistair Denniston
    • Library. Dressed as a World War II naval intelligence office
    • The Imitation Game exhibition
    • Gordon Welchman: Architect of Ultra Intelligence exhibition
  • Huts 3 and 6. Codebreaking offices as they would have looked during World War II.
  • Hut 8.
    • Interactive exhibitions explaining codebreaking
    • Alan Turing's office
    • Pigeon exhibition. The use of pigeons in World War II.
  • Hut 11. Life as a WRNS Bombe operator
  • Hut 12. Bletchley Park: Rescued and Restored. Items found during the restoration work.
  • Wartime garages
  • Secrets Revealed introduction
  • The Road to Bletchley Park. Codebreaking in World War One.
  • Intel Security Cybersecurity exhibition. Online security and privacy in the 21st Century.
  • Operational Bombe Rebuild
  • Lorenz Cipher
  • Alan Turing
  • Enigma machines
  • Japanese codes
  • Home Front exhibition. How people lived in WW2
  • Office of Alistair Denniston
  • Library. Dressed as a World War II naval intelligence office
  • The Imitation Game exhibition
  • Gordon Welchman: Architect of Ultra Intelligence exhibition
  • Interactive exhibitions explaining codebreaking
  • Alan Turing's office
  • Pigeon exhibition. The use of pigeons in World War II.
  • The 1979 ITV television serial Danger UXB featured the character Steven Mount, who was a codebreaker at Bletchley and was driven to a nervous breakdown (and eventual suicide) by the stressful and repetitive nature of the work.
  • In Foyle's War, Adam Wainwright (Samantha Stewart's fiance, then husband), is a former Bletchley Park codebreaker.
  • The Second World War code-breaking sitcom pilot "Satsuma & Pumpkin" was recorded at Bletchley Park in 2003 and featured Bob Monkhouse, OBE in his last ever screen role. The BBC declined to produce the show and develop it further before creating effectively the same show on Radio 4 several years later, featuring some of the same cast, entitled Hut 33.
  • Bletchley came to wider public attention with the documentary series Station X (1999).
  • The 2012 ITV programme, The Bletchley Circle, is a set of murder mysteries set in 1952 and 1953. The protagonists are four female former Bletchley codebreakers, who use their skills to solve crimes. The pilot episode's opening scene was filmed on-site, and the set was asked to remain there for its close adaptation of historiography.
  • Ian McEwan's television play The Imitation Game (1980) concludes at Bletchley Park.
  • Bletchley Park was featured in the sixth and final episode of the BBC TV documentary The Secret War (1977), presented and narrated by William Woodard. This episode featured interviews with Gordon Welchman, Harry Golombek, Peter Calvocoressi, F. W. Winterbotham, Max Newman, Jack Good, and Tommy Flowers.
  • Bletchley is featured in a level of the Russian video game Death to Spies: Moment of Truth. The player, a Soviet spy working for SMERSH, is tasked with killing a professor at the park, and stealing a briefcase pertaining to Bletchley's code-breaking of Soviet communications.
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Wikipedia

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