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    Spider-Man

    • Spider-Man
      Spiderman50.jpg
      Cover of The Amazing Spider-Man vol. 2, #50
      (April 2003)
      Art by J. Scott Campbell and Tim Townsend
      Publication information
      Publisher Marvel Comics
      First appearance Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962)
      Created by Stan Lee (writer)
      Steve Ditko (artist)
      In-story information
      Alter ego Peter Benjamin Parker
      Species Human mutate
      Team affiliations Avengers
      Daily Bugle
      Future Foundation
      New Avengers
      Jean Grey School for Higher Learning
      Abilities
      • Superhuman strength, speed and agility
      • Ability to cling to most surfaces
      • Genius-level intellect
      • Precognitive Spider-sense
      • Utilizes web-shooters to shoot strong spider-web strings from wrists

      Spider-Man is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character was created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko, and first appeared in the anthology comic book Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. 1962) in the Silver Age of Comic Books. Lee and Ditko conceived the character as an orphan being raised by his Aunt May and Uncle Ben, and as a teenager, having to deal with the normal struggles of adolescence in addition to those of a costumed crime-fighter. Spider-Man's creators gave him super strength and agility, the ability to cling to most surfaces, shoot spider-webs using wrist-mounted devices of his own invention, which he calls "web-shooters", and react to danger quickly with his "spider-sense", enabling him to combat his foes.

      When Spider-Man first appeared in the early 1960s, teenagers in superhero comic books were usually relegated to the role of sidekick to the protagonist. The Spider-Man series broke ground by featuring Peter Parker, the high school student behind Spider-Man's secret identity and with whose "self-obsessions with rejection, inadequacy, and loneliness" young readers could relate. While Spider-Man had all the makings of a sidekick, unlike previous teen heroes such as Bucky and Robin, Spider-Man had no superhero mentor like Captain America and Batman; he thus had to learn for himself that "with great power there must also come great responsibility"—a line included in a text box in the final panel of the first Spider-Man story but later retroactively attributed to his guardian, the late Uncle Ben.



      • Superhuman strength, speed and agility
      • Ability to cling to most surfaces
      • Genius-level intellect
      • Precognitive Spider-sense
      • Utilizes web-shooters to shoot strong spider-web strings from wrists
      • In 1981, skyscraper-safety activist Dan Goodwin, wearing a Spider-Man suit, scaled the Sears Tower in Chicago, Illinois, the Renaissance Tower in Dallas, Texas, and the John Hancock Center in Chicago, Illinois.
      • Alain Robert, nicknamed "Spider-Man", is a rock and urban climber who has scaled more than 70 tall buildings using his hands and feet, without using additional devices. He sometimes wears a Spider-Man suit during his climbs. In May 2003, he was paid approximately $18,000 to climb the 312-foot (95 m) Lloyd's building to promote the premiere of the movie Spider-Man on the British television channel Sky Movies.
      • 'The Human Spider', alias Bill Strother, scaled the Lamar Building in Augusta, Georgia in 1921.
      • Fathers 4 Justice member David Chick used a Spider-Man outfit to obtain publicity for fathers' rights in London.
      • Sonchai Yoosabai, a firefighter in Thailand, is considered a real-life Spider-Man. He rescued an 8-year-old boy with autism from falling off the ledge of a building by scaling it with no ropes and then rescuing the boy.
      • 1962 Alley Award: Best Short Story—"Origin of Spider-Man" by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, Amazing Fantasy #15
      • 1963 Alley Award: Best Comic: Adventure Hero title—The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1963 Alley Award: Top Hero—Spider-Man
      • 1964 Alley Award: Best Adventure Hero Comic Book—The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1964 Alley Award: Best Giant Comic—The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1
      • 1964 Alley Award: Best Hero—Spider-Man
      • 1965 Alley Award: Best Adventure Hero Comic Book—The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1965 Alley Award: Best Hero—Spider-Man
      • 1966 Alley Award: Best Comic Magazine: Adventure Book with the Main Character in the Title—The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1966 Alley Award: Best Full-Length Story—"How Green was My Goblin", by Stan Lee & John Romita, Sr., The Amazing Spider-Man #39
      • 1967 Alley Award: Best Comic Magazine: Adventure Book with the Main Character in the Title—The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1967 Alley Award Popularity Poll: Best Costumed or Powered Hero—Spider-Man
      • 1967 Alley Award Popularity Poll: Best Male Normal Supporting Character—J. Jonah Jameson, The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1967 Alley Award Popularity Poll: Best Female Normal Supporting Character—Mary Jane Watson, The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1968 Alley Award Popularity Poll: Best Adventure Hero Strip—The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1968 Alley Award Popularity Poll: Best Supporting Character—J. Jonah Jameson, The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1969 Alley Award Popularity Poll: Best Adventure Hero Strip—The Amazing Spider-Man
      • 1997 Eisner Award: Best Artist/Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team—1997 Al Williamson, Best Inker: Untold Tales of Spider-Man #17-18
      • 2002 Eisner Award: Best Serialized Story—The Amazing Spider-Man vol. 2, #30–35: "Coming Home", by J. Michael Straczynski, John Romita, Jr., and Scott Hanna
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