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  • Oral communication

    Oral communication

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Oral communication

    • Digital dictation

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Digital dictation


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    • Greeting words and phrases

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Greeting words and phrases


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    • Oral history

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Oral history


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    • Oaths

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Oaths


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    • Oral tradition

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Oral tradition


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    • Phonology

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Phonology


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    • Public speaking

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Public speaking


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    • Quotations

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Quotations


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    • Radio

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Radio


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    • Speech processing

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Speech processing


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    • Speech synthesis

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Speech synthesis


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    • Telephony

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Telephony


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    • Whistled languages

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Whistled languages


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    • Speech

    • Speech is the vocalized form of communication based upon the syntactic combination of lexicals and names that are drawn from very large (usually about 1,000 different words)vocabularies. Each spoken word is created out of the phonetic combination of a limited set of vowel and consonant speech sound units (phonemes). Th ... Read »


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    • Accent perception

    • Accents are the distinctive variations in the pronunciation of a language. They can be native or foreign, local or national and can provide information about a person’s geographical locality, socio-economic status and ethnicity. The perception of accents is normal within any given group of language users and invol ... Read »


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    • Akinetic mutism

    • Akinetic mutism is a medical term describing patients tending neither to move (akinesia) nor speak (mutism). Akinetic mutism was first described in 1941 by Cairns et al. as a mental state where patients lack the ability to move or speak. However, their eyes may follow their observer or be diverted by sound. Patients la ... Read »


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    • Auditory processing disorder

    • Auditory processing disorder (APD), also known as central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), is an umbrella term for a variety of disorders that affect the way the brain processes auditory information. Individuals with APD usually have normal structure and function of the outer, middle and inner ear (peripheral heari ... Read »


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    • Awkward silence

    • An awkward silence is an uncomfortable pause in a conversation or presentation. The unpleasant nature of such silences is associated with feelings of anxiety as the participants feel pressure to speak but are unsure of what to say next. In conversation, average pause length varies by language, culture and context. An a ... Read »


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    • Cluttering

    • Cluttering (also called tachyphemia or tachyphrasia) is a speech and communication disorder characterized by a rapid rate of speech, erratic rhythm, and poor syntax or grammar, making speech difficult to understand. Cluttering is a speech and communication disorder that has also been described as a fluency disorde ... Read »


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    • Compulsive talking

    • Compulsive talking (also known astalkaholism) goes beyond the bounds of what is considered to be a socially acceptable amount of talking. The two main factors in determining if someone is a compulsive talker are talking in a continuous manner, only stopping when the other person starts talking, and others perceiving th ... Read »


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    • Conversation

    • Conversation is a form of interactive, spontaneous communication between two or more people. Typically, it occurs in spoken communication, as written exchanges are usually not referred to as conversations. The development of conversational skills and etiquette is an important part of socialization. The development of ... Read »


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    • Conversation opener

    • A conversation opener is an introduction used to begin a conversation. They are frequently the subject of guides and seminars on how to make friends and/or meet people. Different situations may call for different openers (e.g. approaching a stranger on the street versus meeting them at a more structured gathering of pe ... Read »


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    • Conversation theory

    • Conversation theory is a cybernetic and dialectic framework that offers a scientific theory to explain how interactions lead to "construction of knowledge", or "knowing": wishing to preserve both the dynamic/kinetic quality, and the necessity for there to be a "knower". This work was proposed by Gordon Pask in the 1970 ... Read »


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    • Conversational constraints theory

    • Conversational Constraints Theory, developed in Min-Sun Kim, attempts to explain how and why certain conversational strategies differ across various cultures and the effects of these differences. It is embedded in the Social Science communication approach which is based upon how culture influences communication. There ... Read »


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    • Conversational narcissism

    • Narcissism is the pursuit of gratification from vanity or egotistic admiration of one's own attributes. The term originated from Greek mythology, where the young Narcissus fell in love with his own image reflected in a pool of water. Narcissism is a concept in psychoanalytic theory, which was popularly introduced in Si ... Read »


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    • Dialog act

    • A dialog act is a specialized speech act. For example, Question is a speech act, but Question_on_hotel is a dialog act. Dialog acts are different in different dialog systems. The number of speech acts are commonly recognized, and is stable around 10 or so, the number of dialog acts vary from systems to systems. In some ... Read »


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    • Discussion

    • Conversation is a form of interactive, spontaneous communication between two or more people. Typically, it occurs in spoken communication, as written exchanges are usually not referred to as conversations. The development of conversational skills and etiquette is an important part of socialization. The development of ... Read »


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    • Display question

    • A display question is a type of question where the questioner already knows the answer. Display questions are used in language education in order to elicit language practice. They are contrasted with referential questions, questions for which the answer is not yet known. The use of referential questions is generally pr ... Read »


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    • Do Not Interrupt

    • Stephen Kuusisto is an American poet. Stephen Kuusisto was born in Exeter, New Hampshire in March 1955 where he spent most of his childhood. His father worked as a professor of government at the University of New Hampshire and wanted to study the Cold War, so he moved his family to Helsinki, Finland, from 1958 to ... Read »


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    • Ejaculation (grammar)

    • In linguistics, an ejaculation is a short utterance that usually expresses a strong feeling, often in an incomplete sentence (a noun phrase, or sometimes an imperative). Ejaculations are usually just one or two words ("Ouch!", "Shoo!") and in grammar are contrasted with exclamations, which do partake in the "normal" gr ... Read »


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    • Elective mutism

    • Elective mutism was defined as a refusal to speak in almost all social situations (despite normal ability to do so), while selective mutism is considered to be a failure to speak in specific situations and is strongly associated with social anxiety disorder. In contrast to selective mutism, someone who is electively mu ... Read »


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    • Fluency

    • Fluency (also called volubility and eloquency) is the property of a person or of a system that delivers information quickly and with expertise. Fluency is a speech language pathology term that means the smoothness or flow with which sounds, syllables, words and phrases are joined together when speaking quickly. "F ... Read »


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    • Lament

    • A lament or lamentation is a passionate expression of grief, often in music, poetry, or song form. The grief is most often born of regret, or mourning. Laments can also be expressed in a verbal manner, where the participant would lament about something they regret or someone they've lost, usually accompanied by wailing ... Read »


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    • Last Conversation Piece

    • Last Conversation Piece

      Last Conversation Piece is a public artwork by Spanish sculptor Juan Muñoz located outside of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC, United States. This sculpture consists of three pieces which display five figures with bulbous bodies (reminiscent of punching bags). Three are huddled toget ... Read »


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    • Lecture

    • A lecture (from the French 'lecture', meaning 'reading' [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. A politic ... Read »


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    • Locutionary act

    • In linguistics and the philosophy of mind, a locutionary act is the performance of an utterance, and hence of a speech act. The term equally refers to the surface meaning of an utterance because, according to J. L. Austin's posthumous "How To Do Things With Words", a speech act should be analysed as a locutionary act ( ... Read »


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    • Meh

    • Meh (/mɛ/) is an interjection used as an expression of indifference or boredom. It is often regarded as a verbal shrug of the shoulders. The use of the term "meh" shows that the speaker is apathetic, uninterested, or indifferent to the question or subject at hand. It is occasionally used as an adjective, meaning som ... Read »


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    • Nomophobia

    • Nomophobia is a proposed name for the phobia of being out of mobile phone contact. It is, however, arguable that the word "phobia" is misused and that in the majority of cases it is another form of anxiety disorder. Although nomophobia does not appear in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ... Read »


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    • Oracy

    • The term oracy was coined by Andrew Wilkinson, a British researcher and educator, in the 1960s. This word is formed by analogy from literacy and numeracy. The purpose is to draw attention to the neglect of oral skills in education. ... Read »


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    • Oral exam

    • The oral exam (also oral test or viva voce; Rigorosum in German-speaking nations) is a practice in many schools and disciplines in which an examiner poses questions to the student in spoken form. The student has to answer the question in such a way as to demonstrate sufficient knowledge of the subject to pass the exam. ... Read »


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    • Oral history

    • External video

      Oral history is the collection and study of historical information about individuals, families, important events, or everyday life using audiotapes, videotapes, or transcriptions of planned interviews. These interviews are conducted with people who participated in or observed past events and whose memories and percepti ... Read »


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    • Passive fluency

    • Passive fluency is where a person can fluently read and audibly understand a language whilst not having the ability to fluently speak or write the language. Passive fluency is often brought about by being raised in one language (which becomes the person's passive language) and being schooled in another language (which ... Read »


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    • Patter

    • Patter is a prepared and practiced speech that is designed to produce a desired response from its audience. Examples of occupations with a patter might include the auctioneer, salesperson, dance caller, magician, or comedian. The term may have been a colloquial shortening of "Pater Noster", and may have referred to th ... Read »


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    • Perlocutionary act

    • A perlocutionary act (or perlocutionary effect) is a speech act, as viewed at the level of its consequences, such as persuading, convincing, scaring, enlightening, inspiring, or otherwise affecting the listener. This is contrasted with locutionary and illocutionary acts (which are levels of description, rather than cla ... Read »


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    • Phonemic imagery

    • Phonemic imagery refers to the processing of thoughts as words rather than as symbols or other images. It is sometimes referred to as the equivalent of inner speech or covert speech, and sometimes considered as a third phenomenon, separate from but similar to these other forms of internal speech. Phonemic imagery is a ... Read »


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    • Reply

    • A reply is a statement or acknowledgment made in response to an interrogative question, request or comment. Replies are communicated in a variety of ways, the most common being spoken or written, and act as a way of conveying relevant information and continuing a conversational exchange. A simple reply can take the fo ... Read »


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    • Screaming

    • A scream, shout, yell, shriek, hoot, holler, vociferation, outcry, bellow, or raising one's voice is a loud vocalisation in which air is passed through the vocal folds with greater force than is used in regular or close-distance vocalisation. This can be performed by any creature possessing lungs, including humans. The ... Read »


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    • Selective mutism

    • Selective mutism (SM) is an anxiety disorder in which a person who is normally capable of speech does not speak in specific situations or to specific people. Selective mutism usually co-exists with shyness or social anxiety. People with selective mutism stay silent even when the consequences of their silence include sh ... Read »


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    • Shouting match

    • A shouting match is an argument or debate characterized by the loud volume or intensity of the participants. Large assemblies may easily degenerate into shouting matches as the participants raise their voices in order to be heard. To control this tendency towards chaos, rules of conduct such as Robert's Rules are ... Read »


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    • Singing telegram

    • A singing telegram is a message that is delivered by an artist in a musical form. Singing telegrams are historically linked to normal telegrams, but tend to be humorous. Sometimes the artist is in costume or formal clothing. Singing telegrams are often given as a gift. Western Union, the American telegraph company beg ... Read »


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    • Smack talk

    • Trash-talk is a form of insult usually found in sports events. It is often used to intimidate the opposition, but can also be used in a humorous spirit. Trash-talk is often characterized by use of hyperbole or figurative language, such as, "Your team can't run! You run like honey on ice!" Puns and other wordplay are ... Read »


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    • Small talk

    • Small talk is an informal type of discourse that does not cover any functional topics of conversation or any transactions that need to be addressed. Small talk is conversation for its own sake. The phenomenon of small talk was initially studied in 1923 by Bronisław Malinowski, who coined the term "phatic communicat ... Read »


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    • Social cue

    • A social cue can either be a verbal or non-verbal hint, which can be positive or negative. These cues guide conversation and other social interactions. A few examples of social cues include: Social cues serve several purposes in social interactions that help to clarify people's meanings and intentions. Cues help provi ... Read »


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    • Somniloquy

    • Somniloquy or sleep-talking is a parasomnia that refers to talking aloud while asleep. It can be quite loud, ranging from simple mumbling sounds to loud shouts and long frequently inarticulate speeches, and can occur many times during a sleep cycle. As with sleepwalking and night terrors, sleeptalking usually occurs du ... Read »


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    • Speech act

    • A speech act in linguistics and the philosophy of language is an utterance that has performative function in language and communication. According to Kent Bach, "almost any speech act is really the performance of several acts at once, distinguished by different aspects of the speaker's intention: there is the act of sa ... Read »


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    • Speech disfluency

    • A speech disfluency, also spelled speech dysfluency, is any of various breaks, irregularities (within the English language, similar speech dysfluency occurs in different forms in other languages), or non-lexical vocables that occurs within the flow of otherwise fluent speech. These include false starts, i.e. words and ... Read »


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    • Speech-to-text reporter

    • A speech-to-text reporter (STTR), also known as a captioner, is a person who listens to what is being said and inputs it, word for word (), using an electronic shorthand keyboard or speech recognition software and a CAT software system. Their keyboard or speech recognition software is linked to a computer, which conver ... Read »


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    • Stomagram

    • A stomagram (Greek: stoma "mouth," -gram "drawing"), is a (typically side-view) pictogram representation of a human mouth, for the sake of diagramming its state during speech as particular sounds are made. Stomagrams may be cut-away images or simple written character forms, representing the degree the mouth is opened, ... Read »


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    • Table talk (cards)

    • In certain card games, table talk is communication by a player with another player with the cards in their hand, usually contrary to the rules of the game. Such communication may be through explicitly naming cards, but it is far more common to try to give hints which the opposing players will think innocent, but which ... Read »


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    • Table talk (literature)

    • Table talk is a literary genre, a species of memoir. A collector (biographer, colleague, friend, etc.) records impromptu comments by some famous person (made generally at the dining table or in small get-togethers), in anticipation of their lasting value. The precedent in classical literature was the symposium, such as ... Read »


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    • Telephone phobia

    • Telephone phobia (telephonophobia, telephobia, phone phobia) is reluctance or fear of making or taking phone calls, literally, "fear of telephones". It is considered to be a type of social phobia or social anxiety. It may be compared to glossophobia, in that both arise from having to engage with an audience, and the as ... Read »


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    • Time-compressed speech

    • Time-compressed speech refers to an audio recording of verbal text in which the text is presented in a much shorter time interval than it would through normally-paced real time speech. The basic purpose is to make recorded speech contain more words in a given time, yet still be understandable. For example: a paragraph ... Read »


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    • Turn-taking

    • Turn-taking is a type of organization in conversation and discourse where participants speak one at a time in alternating turns. In practice, it involves processes for constructing contributions, responding to previous comments, and transitioning to a different speaker, using a variety of linguistic and non-linguistic ... Read »


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    • Utterance

    • In spoken language analysis an utterance is a smallest unit of speech. It is a continuous piece of speech beginning and ending with a clear pause. In the case of oral languages, it is generally but not always bounded by silence. Utterances do not exist in written language, only their representations do. They can be rep ... Read »


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    • Vocable

    • In the broadest sense of the word, a vocable is any meaningful sound uttered by people, such as a word or term, that is fixed by their language and culture. However, use in the broad sense is archaic. The term is currently used for utterances which are not considered words, such as the English vocables of assent and de ... Read »


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    • Vocal learning

    • Vocal learning is the ability to modify acoustic and syntactic sounds, acquire new sounds via imitation, and produce vocalizations. “Vocalizations” in this case refers only to sounds generated by the vocal organ (mammalian larynx or avian syrinx) as opposed to by the lips, teeth, and tongue, which require sub ... Read »


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    • Vocal music

    • Vocal music is a type of music performed by one or more singers, with or without instrumental accompaniment (a cappella), in which singing provides the main focus of the piece. Music which employs singing but does not feature it prominently is generally considered instrumental music (e.g. the wordless women's choir in ... Read »


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    • Voice procedure

    • Voice procedure includes various techniques used to clarify, simplify and standardise spoken communications over two-way radios, in use by the armed forces, in civil aviation, police and fire dispatching systems, citizens' band radio (CB), etc. Specially, for civil aviation, it used to be called aeronautical phraseolog ... Read »


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    • Waffle (speech)

    • Waffle is language without meaning; blathering, babbling, droning. One might waffle throughout an essay or a presentation, when not having enough material, or needing to fill in time. The term was derived from waff, a 17th-century onomatopoeia for the sound a barking dog makes, similar to the modern woof – the inf ... Read »


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    • Whistling

    • Whistling without the use of an artificial whistle is achieved by creating a small opening with one's lips and then blowing or sucking air through the hole. The air is moderated by the lips, curled tongue, teeth or fingers (placed over the mouth) to create turbulence, and the mouth acts as a resonant chamber to enhance ... Read »


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    • Wolf-whistling

    • Wolf-whistling or finger whistling is a type of whistling in which fingers are inserted above the tongue to produce a louder and more penetrating tone. A wolf-whistle is a resonant sound commonly made using the above the tongue to show high interest or approval of something or someone (originally a girl or woman thoug ... Read »


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    • Oral communication

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