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  • Medieval drama

    Medieval drama

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    • Medieval actors

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    • Religious vernacular drama

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    • Everyman

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Everyman


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    • Medieval French theatre

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Medieval French theatre


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    • Medieval dramatists and playwrights

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Medieval dramatists and playwrights


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    • 14th-century theatre

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about 14th-century theatre


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    • 15th-century theatre

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about 15th-century theatre


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    • Medieval theatre

    • Medieval theatre refers to theatrical performance in the period between the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century A.D. and the beginning of the Renaissance in approximately the 15th century A.D. Medieval Theatre covers all drama produced in Europe over that thousand-year period and refers to a variety of ... Read »


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    • Autos sacramentales

    • Autos sacramentales (Spanish auto, "act" or "ordinance"; sacramental, "sacramental, pertaining to a sacrament") are a form of dramatic literature which is peculiar to Spain, though in some respects similar in character to the old Morality plays of England. The auto sacramental may be defined as a dramatic representati ... Read »


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    • Beunans Meriasek

    • Beunans Meriasek (English: The Life of Saint Meriasek) is a Cornish play completed in 1504. Its subject is the legends of the life of Saint Meriasek or Meriadoc, patron saint of Camborne, whose veneration was popular in Cornwall, Brittany, and elsewhere. It was written in the Cornish language, probably written around t ... Read »


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    • Bewnans Ke

    • Bewnans Ke (English: The Life of Saint Ke) is a Middle Cornish play on the life of Saint Kea or Ke, who was venerated in Cornwall, Brittany and elsewhere. It was written around 1500 but survives only in an incomplete manuscript from the second half of the 16th century. The play was entirely unknown until 2000, when it ... Read »


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    • The Brome play of Abraham and Isaac

    • The Brome play of Abraham and Isaac (also known as The Brome “Abraham and Isaac”, The Brome Abraham, and The Sacrifice of Isaac) is a fifteenth-century play of unknown authorship, written in an East Anglian dialect of Middle English, which dramatises the story of the Akedah, the binding of Isaac. In the ... Read »


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    • Buhez Sante Barba

    • Buhez Sante Barba ("The Life of Saint Barbara") is a mystery play in Middle Breton verse on the life and miracles of the martyr saint Barbara, daughter of King Dioscurus of Nicomedia. It first appeared in print in 1557. Barbara, who has secretly embraced the Christian faith, is carefully guarded by her pagan father, w ... Read »


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    • Hubert Cailleau

    • Hubert Cailleau (c. 1526–1590), was a French historical and miniature painter and stage designer, who flourished at Valenciennes. There are some clever designs made by him, that now reside in the National Library at Paris, which were done for a mystery of the Passion acted at Valenciennes in 1547. He is famous for ... Read »


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    • The Castle of Perseverance

    • The Castle of Perseverance

      MankindBelial World Good Angel Bad AngelSeven deadly sins VirtuesDeathGod the Father The Castle of Perseverance is a c. 15th century morality play and the earliest known full-length (3,649 lines) vernacular play in existence. Along with Mankind and Wisdom, The Castle of Perseverance is preserved in the Macro Manuscrip ... Read »


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    • Cavalcade of Magi

    • The Cavalcade of Magi is a traditional parade of kings coaches, practically in all Spanish cities and also in some cities and towns in Mexico. The Magi (of which tradition holds there were three: Melchior, Gaspar, and Baltasar) ride through the streets, as their page boys throw candies to children. It is celebrated ev ... Read »


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    • Thomas Chaundler

    • Thomas Chaundler (1418–1490) was an English playwright and illustrator. A manuscript at Trinity College, Cambridge, depicts Chaundler presenting one of his plays to the Bishop of Bath, Thomas Beckynton, in 1460. He was born about 1418 in the parish of St. Cuthbert's, Wells. At the end of May 1430, he was adm ... Read »


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    • Chester Mystery Plays

    • The Chester Mystery Plays is a cycle of mystery plays dating back to at least the early part of the 15th century. A record of 1422 shows that the plays took place at the feast of Corpus Christi and this appears to have continued until 1521. Plays on Corpus Christi Day in 1475 included 'The trial and flagellation o ... Read »


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    • Comoedia Lydiae

    • The Comoedia Lydiae (or Lidia) is a medieval Latin elegiac comedy from the late twelfth century. The "argument" at the beginning of the play refers to it as the Lidiades (line 3, a play on Heroides), which the manuscripts gloss as comedia de Lidia facta (a comedy made about Lidia) and which its English translator gives ... Read »


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    • Coventry Mystery Plays

    • The Coventry Mystery Plays, or Coventry Corpus Christi Pageants, are a cycle of medieval mystery plays from Coventry, West Midlands, England, and are perhaps best known as the source of the "Coventry Carol". Two plays from the original cycle are extant having been copied from the now lost original manuscript in the ear ... Read »


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    • The Digby Conversion of Saint Paul

    • The Digby Conversion of Saint Paul (or The Conuersyon of Seynt Paule) is a Middle English miracle play of the late fifteenth century. Written in rhyme royal, it is about the conversion of Paul the Apostle. It is part of a collection of mystery plays that was bequeathed to the Bodleian Library by Sir Kenelm Digby in 163 ... Read »


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    • The Disobedient Child

    • The Disobedient Child is a theatrical comic interlude written c.1560 by Thomas Ingelend (an author who is known only as a "late student of Cambridge", as described on the first edition's title-page) and first performed in a Tudor hall. This play contains the famous line: "None is so deaf as who will not hear." It ... Read »


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    • Dulcitius

    • Dulcitius was a Roman governor of Macedonia during the reign of the emperor Diocletian, at the turn of the fourth century AD. He is chiefly remembered for his role in a hagiographic tale of the persecution of Christian women in Thessalonika, in 304 AD. He is the subject of Dulcitius, an eponymous 10th century drama wri ... Read »


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    • Easter Drama

    • An Easter Drama is a liturgical drama or religious theatrical performance in the Roman Catholic tradition, largely limited to the Middle Ages. These performances evolved from celebrations of the liturgy to incorporate later dramatic and secular elements, and came to be performed in local languages. They were succeeded ... Read »


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    • Elegiac comedy

    • Elegiac comedy was a genre of medieval Latin literature—or drama—which survives as a collection of about twenty texts written in the 12th and 13th centuries in the liberal arts schools of west central France (roughly the Loire Valley). Though commonly identified in manuscripts as comoedia, modern scholars oft ... Read »


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    • La Farce de maître Pathelin


    • Fleury Playbook

    • The Fleury Playbook (French: ''Livre de Jeux de Fleury'' — Orléans, Bibliothèque Municipale MS. 201) is a medieval collection of Latin biblical dramas dating from around 1200 AD It was included in a composite volume of sermons, biblical texts, liturgical dramas, and hymns that was bound and kept at the libra ... Read »


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    • Folly (allegory)

    • Folly (Latin: Moria) was a common allegorical figure in medieval morality plays and in allegorical artwork through the Renaissance. The depiction is generally of a young man, often similar in appearance to a jester or the tarot card, The Fool. In contrast to the many obvious classical allusions in such works, the depic ... Read »


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    • Fulgens and Lucrece

    • Fulgens and Lucrece is a late 15th-century interlude by Henry Medwall. It is the earliest purely secular English play that survives. Since John Cardinal Morton, for whom Medwall wrote the play, died in 1500, the work must have been written before that date. It was probably first performed at Lambeth Palace in 1497, whi ... Read »


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    • The Boy and the Blind Man

    • The Boy and the Blind Man (French: Le Garçon et l'aveugle) is the name of a 13th-century French play; considered the oldest surviving French farce. It is an anonymous work. In the play there are two scoundrels, a "blind" beggar and his servant boy. The blind beggar has a secret hoard of coins, which the boy tricks ... Read »


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    • Harrowing of Hell (drama)

    • The Harrowing of Hell is an eighth-century Latin piece in fifty-five lines found in the Anglo-Saxon Book of Cerne (folios 98v–99v). It is probably a Northumbrian piece, written in prose and verse, where the former serves either as a set of stage directions for a dramatic portrayal or as a series of narrations for ... Read »


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    • Hildegard of Bingen

    • Hildegard of Bingen

      Hildegard of Bingen, O.S.B. (German: Hildegard von Bingen; Latin: Hildegardis Bingensis; 1098 – 17 September 1179), also known as Saint Hildegard and Sibyl of the Rhine, was a German Benedictine abbess, writer, composer, philosopher, Christian mystic, visionary, and polymath. She is considered to be the founder of ... Read »


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    • Horestes

    • Horestes

      Horestes is a late Tudor morality play by the English dramatist John Pickering. It was first published in 1567 and was most likely performed by Lord Rich's men as part of the Christmas revels at court that year. The play's full title is A new interlude of Vice containing the history of Horestes with the cruel revengeme ... Read »


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    • Hrotsvitha

    • Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim (Latin: Hrotsvitha Gandeshemensis; c. 935 – after 973) was a 10th-century German secular canoness, dramatist and poet who lived at Gandersheim Abbey (in modern-day Bad Gandersheim, Lower Saxony), established by the Ottonian dynasty. She wrote in Latin, and is considered by some to be the ... Read »


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    • The Interlude of the Student and the Girl

    • The Interlude of the Student and the Girl (Latin: Interludium de clerico et puella) is one of the earliest known secular plays in English, first performed c. 1300. The text is written in vernacular English, in an East Midlands dialect that suggests either Lincoln or Beverley as its origin, although its title is given i ... Read »


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    • Interlude of Youth

    • The Interlude of Youth is an English 16th-century morality play.[1] It is one of the earliest printed morality plays to have survived. Only two or three copies of any edition are known to exist. Waley's edition of the work appeared probably about the year 1554, and has a woodcut on the title-page of two figures, repres ... Read »


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    • Le Jeu d'Adam


    • Katherine of Sutton

    • Katherine of Sutton, Abbess of Barking (abbess 1358–1376), was a Catholic woman, known for her innovative techniques and creative plays that she wrote during her time at Barking Abbey. As Barking Abbey only accepted women of noble birth, it is almost certain that Katherine was born into nobility. Her position ... Read »


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    • Liberality and Prodigality

    • Liberality and Prodigality (A Pleasant Comedie, shewing the contention betweene Liberalitie and Prodigalitie, also known as Contention between Liberality and Prodigality) is a morality play by an unknown author from c.1567. Its title page also reads: "As it was played before her Maiestie. London Printed by Simon Staffo ... Read »


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    • Liturgical drama

    • Liturgical drama or religious drama, in its various Christian contexts, originates from the Mass itself, and usually presents a relatively complex ritual that includes theatrical elements. Until the Late Middle Ages it is the best recorded tradition of religious drama, and is assumed to have been the root from which ot ... Read »


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    • Macro Manuscript

    • The Macro Manuscript is a collection of three 15th-century English morality plays, known as the "Macro plays" or "Macro moralities": Mankind, The Castle of Perseverance, and Wisdom. So named for its 18th-century owner Reverend (1683–1767), the manuscript contains the earliest complete examples of English morality ... Read »


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    • Mankind (play)

    • Mankind (play)

      Mankind is an English medieval morality play, written c.1470. The play is a moral allegory about Mankind, a representative of the human race, and follows his fall into sin and his repentance. Its author is unknown; the manuscript is signed by a monk named Hyngham, believed to have transcribed the play. Mankind is uniqu ... Read »


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    • Mansion stage

    • A mansion stage is a stage for theatrical performances. They originated in churches where they were small wooden platforms with supports and a roof. Mansions were stage structures used in medieval theatre to represent specific locations, such as Heaven or Hell. The actors would move between these mansions as the play d ... Read »


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    • Le Miracle de Théophile


    • Mystery Play of Elche

    • The Misterio de Elche (Spanish pronunciation: [misˈteɾjo ˈðe ˈeltʃe]), in English the Mystery Play of Elche or Elche Mystery Play and in Valencian Misteri d'Elx (Valencian pronunciation: [misˈtɛɾi ˈðɛʎtʃ]), is a liturgical drama dating from the Middle Ages, which is enact ... Read »


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    • Morality play

    • The morality play is a genre of Medieval and early Tudor theatrical entertainment. In their own time, these plays were known as interludes, a broader term given to dramas with or without a moral. Morality plays are a type of allegory in which the protagonist is met by personifications of various moral attributes who tr ... Read »


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    • The Mysteries

    • The Mysteries is a version of the medieval English mystery plays presented at London's National Theatre in 1978. The cycle of three plays tells the story of the Bible from the creation to the last judgement. It is based largely on the Wakefield cycle of plays (but incorporating some scenes from the York, Chester a ... Read »


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    • Mystery play

    • Mystery plays (perhaps from the Latin "ministerium" meaning "occupation") and miracle plays (they are distinguished as two different forms although the terms are often used interchangeably) are among the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe. Medieval mystery plays focused on the representation of Bible ... Read »


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    • N-Town Plays

    • The N-Town Plays (also called the Hegge Cycle and the Ludus Coventriae cycle) are a cycle of 42 medieval Mystery plays from between 1450 and 1500. The manuscript is now housed in the British Library, London (BL MS Cotton Vespasian D.8). As its name might suggest, though, it was once the property of the 17th-centur ... Read »


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    • The Nativity (play)

    • The Nativity was a 58-minute United States television drama with music about the birth of Jesus Christ, presented on the television anthology Westinghouse Studio One. Directed by Franklin Schaffner, it is a rare modern network television production of an authentic mystery play, mostly culled from the York and Chester m ... Read »


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    • Ordinalia

    • The Ordinalia are three medieval mystery plays dating to the late fourteenth century, written primarily in Middle Cornish, with stage directions in Latin. The three plays are Origo Mundi (The Origin of the World, a.k.a. Ordinale de Origine Mundi, 2,846 lines), Passio Christi (The Passion of Christ, a.k.a. Passio Domini ... Read »


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    • Ordo Rachelis

    • The Ordo Rachelis (Play of Rachel), Interfectio Puerorum (Murder of the Children), or Ludus Innocentium (Play of the Innocents) is a medieval dramatic tradition consisting in four plays and based on the Massacre of the Innocents, an event recorded in the Gospel of Matthew, and on the prophecy recorded in the Book of Je ... Read »


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    • Ordo Virtutum

    • Ordo Virtutum (Latin for Order of the Virtues) is an allegorical morality play, or liturgical drama, by Hildegard of Bingen, composed c. 1151. It is the earliest morality play by more than a century, and the only Medieval musical drama to survive with an attribution for both the text and the music. A short version of ... Read »


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    • Pamphilus de amore

    • Pamphilus de amore (or, simply, Pamphilus) is a 780-line, twelfth-century Latin comedic play, probably composed in France but possibly Spain. It was 'one of the most influential and important of all the many pseudo-Ovidian productions concerning the "arts of Love" ' in medieval Europe, and 'the most famous and influent ... Read »


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    • Paphnutius (play)

    • Paphnutius or The Conversion of the Harlot Thaïs is a play originally written in Latin by Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim (935-1002). It concerns the relationship between Saint Thaïs, once a courtesan of Alexandria in Roman Egypt, and Paphnutius the Ascetic, the hermit who offered her conversion to Christianity. The ch ... Read »


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    • Pasku

    • Pasku is a Roman Catholic Passion Play which originated in the Catholic areas of Jaffna in northern Sri Lanka in the late 19th century. Soon after, it was performed in the Sinhales speaking Catholic regions of the western coastal region as well. The play began in Passion week and lasted for the entire Holy Week. In som ... Read »


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    • Passion Play

    • The Passion Play or Easter pageant is a dramatic presentation depicting the Passion of Jesus Christ: his trial, suffering and death. It is a traditional part of Lent in several Christian denominations, particularly in Catholic tradition. The development of the Passion Play was about the same as that of the Easter ... Read »


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    • Sri Lankan Passion plays

    • Sri Lanka has a tradition of presenting passion plays on stage for more than 300 years. Negombo is the main city preserving this form of traditional drama. There is another tradition known as 'Wasapuwa' performing Saint Sebastian's life story which is very popular among Christians as well as non Christians in Sri Lanka ... Read »


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    • Play of Daniel

    • The Play of Daniel, or Ludus Danielis, is either of two medieval Latin liturgical dramas based on the biblical Book of Daniel, one of which is accompanied by monophonic music. Two medieval plays of Daniel survive. The first is one of the plays in the Fleury Playbook, a 13th-century manuscript containing ten liturgical ... Read »


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    • The Play of the Weather

    • The Play of the Weather is an English interlude or morality play from the early Tudor period. The play was written by John Heywood, a courtier, musician and playwright during the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary I and published by his brother-in-law, William Rastell, in 1533 as The Play of the Wether, a new and ... Read »


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    • Quem quaeritis?


    • A Satire of the Three Estates

    • A Satire of the Three Estates

      A Satire of the Three Estates (Middle Scots: Ane Pleasant Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis), is a satirical morality play in Middle Scots, written by makar Sir David Lyndsay. The complete play was first performed outside in the playing field at Cupar, Fife in June 1552 during the Midsummer holiday, where the action took pl ... Read »


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    • The Second Shepherds' Play


    • Sinnekins

    • Sinnekins are often found in medieval drama, especially morality plays. They most often occur as pairs of devilish characters who exert their perfidious influence on the main character of the drama. The word sinnekin comes from the Dutch word sinneken which, by 1604, connoted the words "senses" or "meanings". The wor ... Read »


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    • Sponsus

    • Sponsus or The Bridegroom is a medieval Latin and Occitan dramatic treatment of Jesus' parable of the ten virgins. A liturgical play designed for Easter Vigil, it was composed probably in Gascony or western Languedoc in the mid-eleventh century. Its scriptural basis is found in the Gospel of Matthew (25:1–13), but ... Read »


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    • Star singers

    • Star singers also known as "Epiphany singers", or "Star boys' singing procession" (England), are children and young people walking from house to house with a star on a rod and often wearing crowns and dressed in clothes to resemble the Three Magi (variously also known as Three Kings or Three Wise Man). The singing proc ... Read »


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    • Tableau vivant

    • Tableau vivant (plural: tableaux vivants), French for 'living picture', is a style of artistic presentation, often shortened to simply tableau. It most often describes a group of suitably costumed actors, carefully posed and often theatrically lit. By extension, it also applied to works of visual art including painting ... Read »


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    • Terentius et delusor

    • Terentius et delusor is an anonymous poetical treatise, variously described as a dialogue or spoken play, preserved only in fragments in a twelfth-century manuscript. It is the earliest example of the author or presenter of a play appearing as a person in the work, and in this case both appear: Terence and the (critica ... Read »


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    • Verses pascales de tres Maries

    • The Verses pascales de tres Maries (Easter Verses of the Three Maries) are twelfth-century Latin lyric verses from Vic that form a liturgical drama for performance at Easter. The play, by an anonymous cleric, is highly original in content and form, though it only runs ninety-four lines. The three Maries of the tit ... Read »


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    • Versus de pelegrino

    • The Versus de pelegrino or Verses about the Stranger is a medieval Latin drama composed by an anonymous playwright of Vic c. 1130. The Versus is a short piece of only forty lines on the meeting between Mary Magdalene and the glorified Jesus Christ on the road as recorded in the Gospel of John (chapter 20). It is a foll ... Read »


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    • Vice (character)

    • Vice is a of the medieval morality plays. While the main character of these plays was representative of every human being (and usually named Mankind, Everyman, or some other generalizing of humanity at large), the other characters were representatives of (and usually named after) personified virtues or vices who sough ... Read »


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    • Wakefield Mystery Plays

    • The Wakefield or Towneley Mystery Plays are a series of thirty-two mystery plays based on the Bible most likely performed around the Feast of Corpus Christi probably in the town of Wakefield, England, during the late Middle Ages until 1576. It is one of only four surviving English mystery play cycles. Some scholars arg ... Read »


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    • Wisdom (play)

    • Wisdom (play)

      Wisdom (dressed as Christ)Lucifer Anima, the Soul Mind Will Understanding Wisdom (also known as Mind, Will, and Understanding) is one of the earliest surviving medieval morality plays. Together with Mankind and The Castle of Perseverance, it forms a collection of early English moralities called "The Macro Plays". Wisd ... Read »


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    • The World and the Child

    • The World and the Child

      The World and the Child (Latin: Mundus et Infans) is an anonymous English morality play. Its source is a late 14th-century or 15th-century poem The Mirror of the Periods of Man's Life, from which the play borrows significantly while reducing the number of characters. It is thought to have influenced William Shakespeare ... Read »


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    • York Mystery Plays

    • The York Mystery Plays, more properly the York Corpus Christi Plays , are a Middle English cycle of 48 mystery plays or pageants covering sacred history from the creation to the Last Judgment. They were traditionally presented on the feast day of Corpus Christi (a movable feast on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday, bet ... Read »


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