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    • Acute rehabilitation unit

    • Acute Rehabilitation Unit, also known as inpatient rehabilitation facility, is a hospital ward designated for physical medicine and rehabilitation. ... Read »


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    • Adams Forward Bend Test

    • The Adams Forward Bend Test is used in many situations to diagnose scoliosis, however it is not a primary source for a diagnosis. This test is often used at schools and doctors offices to check for scoliosis. The patient bends forward, as if they are diving. If the patient has scoliosis, their back often has a prominen ... Read »


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    • Adenosarcoma

    • Adenosarcoma is an uncommon form of cancer that arises from mesenchymal tissue and has a benign glandular component. It may arise in the Uterus, ovary, and fallopian tube. ... Read »


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    • Alcohol intolerance

    • Alcohol intolerance is due to a genetic deficiency of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme that metabolises ingested alcohol. It can also be an effect or side effect associated with certain drugs such as disulfiram, metronidazole, or nilutamide. It is characterized as intolerance of and unpleasant symptoms upon ... Read »


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    • Ambulatory Patient Group

    • Ambulatory Patient Group (APG) is a classification system for outpatient services reimbursement developed for the American Medicare service by the Health Care Financing Administration. It classifies patients into nearly 300 pathology groups rather than the 14,000 of the International Classification of Diseases. The AP ... Read »


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    • Anesthesiology

    • Anesthesiology, anaesthesia or anaesthetics is the medical speciality that focuses on perioperative medicine and the administration of anesthesia. The American Society of Anesthesiologists define anesthesiology as "the practice of medicine dedicated to the relief of pain and total care of the surgical patient before, d ... Read »


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    • Anti-DNase B

    • Anti-Deoxyribonuclease B (Anti-DNase B) titres are a quantitative measure of the presence of serologic antibodies obtained from patients suspected of having a recent group A (Beta-hemolytic) bacteria infection, from . In a patient with suspected post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, anti-streptolysin-O titres can be ... Read »


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    • Antibody barcoding

    • Antibody barcoding, is a "protein profiling" technique that has been used to analyze hundreds of proteins from small tissue samples, such as minimally invasive fine-needle aspirates from cancer tissue. Although promising, the technique has not yet been extensively proven or developed. The method involves optical mappi ... Read »


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    • Antigen retrieval

    • Tissues that have been preserved with formaldehyde, a highly reactive compound, contain a variety of chemical modifications that can reduce the detectability of proteins in biomedical procedures such as . Antigen retrieval is an approach to reducing or eliminating these chemical modifications. The two primary methods o ... Read »


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    • Antonin Jean Desormeaux

    • Antonin Jean Desormeaux was a 19th-century French physician and inventor who has been called the "father of endoscopy", because he made significant improvements to the early endoscope and was the first to successfully use it to operate on a living patient (his device would be called a cystoscope today). He presented hi ... Read »


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    • Åstrand test


    • Atrial switch

    • Atrial switch is a heart operation performed to treat dextro- transposition of the great arteries. It involves the construction of an atrial baffle which redirects the blood coming into the atria to restore the connection between systemic and pulmonary circulation. Two variants of the atrial switch operation exist - t ... Read »


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    • Barrier nursing

    • Barrier nursing is a set of stringent infection control techniques used in nursing. The aim of barrier nursing is to protect medical staff against infection by patients, particularly those with highly infectious diseases. Reverse barrier nursing is similar, but concentrates on the reverse: protecting vulnerable patient ... Read »


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    • Bedridden

    • Being bedridden is a form of involuntary bed rest. Medical risks are associated with long term lying down, see lying (position)#Long-term risks. One Indian study of care given to bedridden individuals at home found that family members made up 82% of caregivers. A high rate of complications was reported, including pres ... Read »


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    • Behavioral observation audiometry

    • Behavioral observation audiometry (BOA) is a type of audiometry done in children of age less than 6 months. ... Read »


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    • Benign hereditary chorea

    • Benign hereditary chorea (BHC), also known as benign familial chorea, is a rare autosomal dominant neurogenetic syndrome. It typically presents in childhood with isolated chorea. Unlike other neurogenetic causes of chorea such as Huntington's disease, BHC is not progressive, and not associated with cognitive decline or ... Read »


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    • Black stomach

    • Black stomach is a condition that results from acute gastric necrosis. The tarry black colour is produced by the coagulative necrosis of mucosa resulting in intramucosal haemorrhage and acid hematin deposition.This condition was first described in a patient with acid poisoning. A similar condition has been described in ... Read »


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    • BODE index

    • The BODE index, for Body-mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise, is a multidimensional scoring system and capacity index used to test patients who have been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to predict long-term outcomes for them. The index uses the four factors to predict ... Read »


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    • Breast tension

    • Breast tension is a term that can refer to a constellation of symptoms involving the breasts including: ... Read »


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    • Cardiac aberrancy

    • Cardiac aberrancy is a type of aberration of the electrical conduction system of the heart. Aberration occurs when the action potential is conducting improperly, which can be due to: ... Read »


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    • Carlos III Health Institute

    • The Carlos III Health Institute (Spanish: Instituto de Salud Carlos III; ISCIII) is a Spanish public health research institute. Legally, it is constituted as an Organismo Público de Investigación, a type of quasi-autonomous entity under Spanish law. Since 2011 it has reported to the Ministry of Economy and Compet ... Read »


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    • Certified Case Manager

    • In today’s complex health care environment, the professional case manager serves as the client advocate to ensure safe, effective and efficient provision of needed health services. Research from the Commission’s own primary research, the Role & Functions Study indicates that employers recognize the next level ... Read »


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    • Chaperone (clinical)

    • In clinical medicine, a chaperone is a person who serves as a witness for both a patient and a medical practitioner as a safeguard for both parties during a medical examination or procedure. The exact responsibilities vary according to the clinical situation. Chaperones are widely used for gynecological and other inti ... Read »


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    • Cheesewiring

    • In medicine the term cheesewiring describes any process in which cells or intercellular matrix are dissected either by the material being pressed through a taut element (as seen in red blood cells in microangiopathic hemolysis), or by the tension of a taut element pulling through (as seen in the stitches of a corneal t ... Read »


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    • Cidex

    • Cidex is a common designation for a variety of solutions used for antimicrobial or disinfection purposes: ... Read »


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    • Classificatie van verrichtingen

    • Classificatie van verrichtingen is a Dutch system of health coding procedures. It is based on ICD-9-CM (the International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification), but not identical to it. It is abbreviated "CvV". ... Read »


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    • Clear cell carcinoma

    • A Clear-cell carcinoma is a carcinoma (i.e. not a sarcoma) showing clear cells. "A rare type of tumor, usually of the female genital tract, in which the insides of the cells look clear when viewed under a microscope. Also called clear cell adenocarcinoma and mesonephroma." Examples : ... Read »


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    • Clinical clerkship

    • Clinical clerkships encompass a period of medical education in which students – medical, nursing, dental, or otherwise – practice medicine under the supervision of a health practitioner. In medical education, a clerkship, or rotation, refers to the practice of medicine by medical students (M.D., D.O., D.P.M) ... Read »


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    • Clinical virology

    • Clinical or medical virology is a branch of medicine (more particularly of clinical pathology) which consists in isolating and/or in characterising one or several viruses responsible for some human pathologies by various direct or indirect techniques (cellular Cultures, serologies, biochemistry, molecular biology). It ... Read »


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    • Clinician

    • A clinician is a health care professional that works as a primary care giver of a patient in a hospital, skilled nursing facility, clinic, or patient's home. A clinician diagnoses and treats patients. For example, physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants are clinicians; a speech-language pathol ... Read »


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    • Coital angina

    • Coital angina

      Angina, also known as angina pectoris, is the sensation of chest pain, pressure, or squeezing, often due to not enough blood flow to the heart muscle as a result of obstruction or spasm of the coronary arteries. While angina pectoris can occur due to anemia, abnormal heart rhythms and heart failure, its main cause is ... Read »


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    • Collagen gel contraction assay

    • The collagen gel contraction assay is a type of wound contraction. It is performed using the dermal equivalent model, which consists of dermal fibroblasts seeded into a collagen gel. ... Read »


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    • Community-based clinical trial

    • Community-based clinical trials are clinical trials conducted directly through doctors and clinics rather than academic research facilities. They are designed to be administered through primary care physicians, community health centers and local outpatient facilities. In 1986, the Community Consortium held the first su ... Read »


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    • Comparative medicine

    • Comparative medicine involves the study of diseases across species in order to improve understanding. ... Read »


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    • Compound muscle action potential

    • The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) or compound motor action potential is an electromyography investigation (electrical study of muscle function). The CMAP idealizes the summation of a group of almost simultaneous action potentials from several muscle fibers in the same area. These are usually evoked by stimula ... Read »


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    • Comprehensive Health Assessment Program

    • The Comprehensive Health Assessment Program is a clinically successful system for providing comprehensive medical histories for patients with disabilities. The information is stored in one central location, completed by the patient with their carers and practitioners. The CHAP is currently being used by the Queensland ... Read »


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    • Computational epidemiology

    • Computational epidemiology is a multidisciplinary field that uses techniques from computer science, mathematics, geographic information science and public health to better understand issues central to epidemiology such as the spread of diseases or the effectiveness of a public health intervention. In contrast with tra ... Read »


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    • Connatal cyst

    • A connatal cyst is a cystic area adjacent to the superolateral margin of the body and frontal horn of the lateral ventricles, and are believed to represent a normal variant. On imaging, the outward most part of the ventricles has rounded appearance, giving the cystic appearance on ultrasound. ... Read »


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    • Consecutive case series

    • A consecutive case series is a clinical study that includes all eligible patients identified by the researchers during the study registration period. The patients are treated in the order in which they are identified. This type of study usually does not have a control group. For example, in Sugrue, et al. (2016), a co ... Read »


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    • Consensual response

    • A consensual response is any reflex observed on one side of the body when the other side has been stimulated. For example, if an individual's right eye is shielded and light shines into the left eye, constriction of the right pupil will occur, as well as the left. This is because the afferent signal sent through one o ... Read »


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    • Conservative management

    • Conservative management is a type of medical treatment defined by the avoidance of invasive measures such as surgery or other invasive procedures, usually with the intent to preserve function or body parts. For example, in Appendicitis, conservative management may include watchful waiting and treatment with antibiotics ... Read »


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    • Constant visual observation

    • Constant visual observation, often abbreviated to "constant visual", is a term used in various Mental Health Services, Prisons and Special Schools to describe the status of a prisoner or patient who poses a threat to himself or a third party, and must therefore be kept under constant observation. There are essentially ... Read »


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    • Cragie tube

    • The Cragie tube or Craigie tube is a method used in microbiology for determining bacterial motility. A hollow tube with some culture medium is placed in semi-solid agar inside a bottle. Now a sample of the bacterium to be tested is inoculated into the medium in the hollow tube and the setup is incubated at 37°C ove ... Read »


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    • Craving (withdrawal)

    • When going through withdrawal, craving is a psychological urge to administer a discontinued medication or recreational drug. The duration that cravings last after discontinuation varies substantially between different addictive drugs. For instance, in smoking cessation, a substantial relief is achieved after approxima ... Read »


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    • Crista dividens

    • Crista dividens is a structure in the developing heart of the human embryo that divides the right atrium in a way such that it creates a pan systolic murmur in the same way as the foramen ovale. Recognition of the absence of this murmur can indicate a potentially terminal cardiac defect in the newborn. Crista dividende ... Read »


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    • Cross education

    • Cross education is a neurophysiological phenomenon where an increase in strength is witnessed within an untrained limb following unilateral strength training in the opposite, contralateral limb. Cross education can also be seen in the transfer of skills from one limb to the other. A resistance trainer witnesses stren ... Read »


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    • Crutch paralysis

    • Crutch paralysis is a form of paralysis which can occur when either the radial nerve or part of the brachial plexus, containing various nerves that innervate sense and motor function to the arm and hand, is under constant pressure, such as by the use of a crutch. This can lead to paralysis of the muscles innervated by ... Read »


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    • Cuffitis

    • Cuffitis is inflammation at the anal transition zone or “cuff” created as a result of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). It is considered a variant form of ulcerative colitis that occurs in the rectal cuff. Cuffitis is a common complication of IPAA, particularly when a stapled anastomosis without mucosectom ... Read »


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    • Culture conversion

    • Culture conversion is a diagnostic criteria indicating the point at which samples taken from a patient infected with a tuberculosis can no longer produce tuberculosis cell cultures. Culture conversion is a positive prognostic marker indicating that a patient is cured of, or is recovering from, tuberculosis. ... Read »


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    • Curative care

    • Curative care or curative medicine is the health care given for medical conditions where a cure is considered achievable, or even possibly so, and directed to this end. Curative care differs from preventive care, which aims at preventing the appearance of diseases through pharmaceuticals and such techniques as immuniza ... Read »


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    • Cyclical alternating pattern

    • The cyclical alternating pattern occurs in sleep. Characterized as periodic episodes of aroused EEG activity (more sleep spindles and K-complexes) followed by a period of more quiet sleep. Both these periodic activities, when combined, are considered the CAP period. CAP does not occur in REM. ... Read »


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    • Cytopenia

    • Cytopenia is a reduction in the number of blood cells. It takes a number of forms: ... Read »


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    • DAM (chemotherapy)

    • DAM in the context of chemotherapy is an acronym that means a chemotherapy regimen most often used as an induction regimen in acute myelogenous leukemia, usually for those who are refractory to the standard "7+3" induction regimen or who has relapsed. But this regimen also can be used as primary, first-line induction t ... Read »


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    • Dawn phenomenon

    • The dawn phenomenon, sometimes called the dawn effect, is an early-morning (usually between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m.) increase in blood sugar (glucose) relevant to people with diabetes. It is different from chronic Somogyi rebound in that dawn phenomenon is not associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia. The dawn phenomenon can ... Read »


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    • DEAF1

    • The DEAF1 transcription factor (HGNC:14677) (or "deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor 1 in Drosophila) is coded by DEAF1 at 11p15.5. It is a member of the Zinc finger protein and MYND-type protein. ... Read »


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    • Debility (medical)

    • In medicine, debility is being weak or feeble. ... Read »


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    • Defense blood standard system

    • The Defense Blood Standard System (DBSS) is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-regulated, Class II Medical Device designed to handle blood collection, processing and tracking procedures, and automation of standards and safeguards for the Military Health System (MHS) blood supply. DBSS is also identified by the FDA as ... Read »


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    • Deficiency (medicine)

    • In medicine, a deficiency is a lack or shortage of a functional entity, by less than normal or necessary supply or function. Malnutrition can cause various effects by deficiency of one or more nutrients. For example, vitamin A deficiency causes symptoms such as xerophthalmia (dry eyes) and night blindness. Deficienci ... Read »


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    • Degeneration (medical)

    • Degeneration is deterioration in the medical sense. Generally, it is the change from a higher to a lower form. More specifically, it is the change of tissue to a lower or less functionally active form. Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary (Twenty-sixth Edition) () ... Read »


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    • Delayed pressure urticaria

    • Delayed pressure urticaria is known as one of the more painful subsets of physical urticaria due to formed hives being deep-seated and appearing after 4–6 hours. Due to the delayed appearance of wheals, plausible causes are hard to establish; the natural course and/or clinical pattern is variable and inconclusive ... Read »


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    • Denudation (medicine)

    • In medicine, denudation refers to the loss of surface layers, such as the epithelium. ... Read »


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    • Depurative

    • Depuratives are herbs that are considered to have purifying and detoxifying effects. Herbs that are considered depurative include Lingonberry, Ukshi, the four-leaf clover, Paris polyphylla, and some species of Elderberry. ... Read »


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    • Dermal equivalent

    • The dermal equivalent is an in vitro model of the dermal layer of skin. It is constructed by seeding dermal fibroblasts into a collagen gel. This gel may then be allowed to contract as a model of wound contraction. This collagen gel contraction assay may be used to screen for treatments which promote or inhibit contrac ... Read »


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    • Dermaordinologie

    • Dermaordinology (from Ancient Greek δέρμα (derma) “skin”, Latin ordināre, “to put in order” and Ancient Greek λόγος, “knowledge/study”) is a specialised field in cosmetics and medicine aimed at finding the optimal permanent solution to superficial skin defe ... Read »


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    • Diagnostic overshadowing

    • Diagnostic overshadowing is the attribution of a person’s symptoms to their mental condition, when such symptoms actually suggest a comorbid condition. The term was first used to describe the underdiagnosis of mental illness in the intellectually disabled. In recent years, the term has also been used when physical ... Read »


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    • Diagnostically Acceptable Irreversible Compression

    • In medical imaging applications, Diagnostically Acceptable Irreversible Compression, abbreviated DAIC, is the application of irreversible compression in medical imaging to produce a result that has no negative impact on the ability of the user to perform a particular diagnostic task (contribute to making a medical diag ... Read »


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    • Diaphragmatic excursion

    • Diaphragmatic excursion is the movement of the thoracic diaphragm during breathing. Normal diaphragmatic excursion should be 3–5 cm, but can be increased in well-conditioned persons to 7–8 cm. This measures the contraction of the diaphragm. It is performed by asking the patient to exhale and hold it. ... Read »


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    • Diathesis (medicine)

    • In medicine and allied fields, diathesis (from Greek διάθεσις) is a hereditary or constitutional predisposition to a disease or other disorder. Atopic diathesis is a predisposition to develop one or more of hay fever, allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, or atopic dermatitis. ... Read »


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    • Differentiation therapy

    • Differentiation therapy is an approach to treating advanced cancers in which malignant cells are encouraged to differentiate into more mature forms using pharmacological agents. The basis of the therapy stems from the tendency of malignant tumor cells to assume a less specialized, stem cell-like dedifferentiated state. ... Read »


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    • Diplophonia

    • Diplophonia, also known as diphthongia, is a phenomenon in which a voice is perceived as being produced with two concurrent pitches. Diplophonia is a result of vocal fold vibrations that are quasi-periodic in nature. It has been reported from old days, but there are no uniform interpretation of established mechanisms. ... Read »


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    • Disease causative agent

    • The term disease causative agent usually refers to the biological pathogen that causes a disease, such as a virus, parasite, fungus, or bacterium. Technically, the term can also refer to a toxin or toxic chemical that causes illness. ... Read »


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    • Disequilibrium (medicine)

    • In medicine, disequilibrium refers to an impaired sense of equilibrioception. It is one of the causes of dizziness. ... Read »


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    • Dispase

    • Dispase is a protease which cleaves fibronectin, collagen IV, and to a lesser extent collagen I. It is found in some bacteria and can be isolated from culture filtrates of Bacillus polymyxa. It can be extracted, purified, and used in research. It can be particularly useful to separate embryonic epithelia and mesenchyme ... Read »


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    • Dolo-Arthrosenex

    • Dolo-Arthrosenex is a combination drug, consisting of the following individual drugs: ... Read »


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    • Downie bodies

    • Downie bodies are a type of inclusion body associated with cowpox. They are named for Allan Watt Downie. They are also known as a type of A-type inclusion. It should not be confused with the term "Downey bodies", which refers to a type of T cell observed in infectious mononucleosis. ... Read »


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    • Dryness (medical)

    • Dryness is a medical condition in which there is local or more generalized decrease in normal lubrication of the skin or mucous membranes. Examples of local dryness include dry mouth, dry eyes, dry skin and vaginal dryness. These often have specific causes and treatments. It is possible to have dry eyes without any ot ... Read »


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    • Dubowitz Score

    • The Dubowitz Score is a method for estimating the gestational age of babies. It was devised by Lilly Dubowitz, a Hungarian-born British paediatrician, and her husband, the British neurologist Victor Dubowitz. ... Read »


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    • Ductopenia

    • Ductopenia refers to a reduction in the number of ducts in an organ. It is the histological hallmark of vanishing bile duct syndrome (typically <0.5 bile ducts per portal triad). The most common cause of ductopenia is primary biliary cholangitis. Other causes of ductopenia include failing liver transplant, Hodgkin's l ... Read »


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    • EBOO

    • EBOO or Extracorporeal Blood Oxygenation and Ozonation is a hemofiltration-like procedure developed and reported in 2005 as being used in the medical department at the University of Siena in Italy. ... Read »


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    • Eburnation

    • Eburnation describes a degenerative process of bone commonly found in patients with osteoarthritis or non-union of fractures. It is an ivory-like reaction of bone occurring at the site of cartilage erosion. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease of the joints characterized largely by central loss of cartilage and com ... Read »


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    • Ectopic thymus

    • Ectopic thymus is a condition where thymus tissue is found in an abnormal location. It can be associated with failure of descent. It can also be associated with failure of involution. ... Read »


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    • Edgren's bias


    • Efficiency of conversion

    • The efficiency of conversion of ingested food to unit of body substance (ECI, also termed "growth efficiency") is an index measure of food fuel efficiency in animals. The ECI is a rough scale of how much of the food ingested is converted into growth in the animal's mass. It can be used to compare the growth efficiency ... Read »


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    • EHCF School of Medical Informatics

    • eHCF School of Medical Informatics is promoted by eHealth-Care Foundation, and provides distance learning program for a "Certificate in Medical Informatics". ... Read »


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    • Eimeria meleagridis

    • Eimeria meleagrimitis is a species of Eimeria that causes congestion or petechia from the duodenum to the ileum with dilation of the jejunum and mucosal cast in the small intestines of turkeys. This moderate to severe pathogen is confirmed on necropsy followed by scrapings to view the oocysts under a microscope. Infect ... Read »


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    • Electro-olfactography

    • Electro-olfactography or electroolfactography (EOG) is a type of electrography (electrophysiologic test) that aids the study of olfaction (the sense of smell). It measures and records the changing electrical potentials of the olfactory epithelium, in a way similar to how other forms of electrography (such as ECG, EEG, ... Read »


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    • Endoluminal capsule monitoring

    • Endoluminal capsule monitoring is a non-invasive medical diagnostic procedure which uses a miniaturized wireless radio transmitter embedded into an ingestible water-tight capsule. The patient ingests the capsule and while it transits through the gastrointestinal system, it sends signals to the outside, which are captur ... Read »


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    • Endoscope

    • An endoscope is an illuminated optical, typically slender and tubular instrument used to look deep into the body and used in procedures called an endoscopy. "Endo" is Greek for "within" while "scope" comes from the Greek word "skopos" meaning to target or look out. It is used to examine the internal organs like the thr ... Read »


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    • Evandro Chagas Institute

    • The Evandro Chagas Institute (Portuguese Instituto Evandro Chagas, or IEC) is a non-profit organization which promotes public health in Brazil named after Evandro Chagas. In the 1940s fisherman Henrique Penna from the Rockefeller Foundation in Rio de Janeiro reported that he had discovered cases of leishmaniasis i ... Read »


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    • F-factor (conversion factor)

    • The F-factor, in diagnostic radiology, is the conversion factor between exposure and absorbed dose. In other words, it converts between the amount of ionization in air (roentgens or coulombs/kg) and the absorbed dose in tissue (rads or grays). The two determinants are of the F-factor are the effective Z of the material ... Read »


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    • Facet joint arthrosis

    • Facet joint arthrosis is an intervertebral disc disorder. The facet joints or zygapophyseal joints are synovial cartilage covered joints that limit the movement of the spine and preserve segmental stability. In the event of hypertrophy of the vertebrae painful arthrosis can occur. The "lumbar facet arthrosis syndrome" ... Read »


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    • Fibrinogenolysis

    • Primary fibrinogenolysis is a medical condition that appears with abnormal production of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products (FDP), degradation of coagulation factors V, VIII, IX, XI and/or degradation of the fibrin present in any pre-existing localized thrombi and hemostatic clots. ... Read »


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    • First-in-man study

    • A first-in-man study is a clinical trial where a medical procedure, previously developed and assessed through in vitro or animal testing, or through mathematical modelling is tested on human subjects for the first time. Sometimes, this is called a Phase 0 study. Such studies present particular risks to the human subje ... Read »


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    • Flexal mammarenavirus

    • The Flexal mammarenavirus (also known as the Flexal virus or FLEV, and previously known by the laboratory code BeAn 293022) is a mammarenavirus: an arenavirus with a mammalian host. It was first found in semiaquatic rodents of the genus Oryzomys in tropical forest in the Pará area of Brazil. It is a member of Clade ... Read »


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    • Functional Capacity Index

    • The Functional Capacity Index (FCI) is a measure of a person's level of function for the following 12 months after sustaining some form of illness or injury. The FCI incorporates ten physical functions and gives each a numerical value on a scale of 0 to 100, with 100 representing no limitations on a person's everyday f ... Read »


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    • Genetic significant dose

    • Genetic significant dose (GSD), or genetically significant dose, was initially defined by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) in 1958. It represents an estimate of the genetic significance of gonad radiation doses. Annual GSD is calculated by weighting the individual gonad ... Read »


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    • Global Research Collaboration for Infectious Disease Preparedness

    • The Global Research Collaboration for Infectious Disease Preparedness (GLOPID-R) is an international initiative to anticipate and prepare for future threats from infectious diseases. Founded in 2013, GLOPID-R is intended to be a means for facilitating communication and collaboration between its member bodies, not a fun ... Read »


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    • Juan Gutiérrez Moreno (physician)


    • Horizontal transmission

    • Horizontal transmission is the transmission of infections between members of the same species that are not in a parent-child relationship. This has been generalized to include transmissions of cultural traits between humans. Because the evolutionary fate of the agent is not tied to reproductive success of the host, ho ... Read »


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    • Hormone-sensitive cancer

    • A hormone-sensitive cancer, or hormone-dependent cancer, is a type of cancer that is dependent on a hormone for growth and/or survival. Examples include breast cancer, which is dependent on estrogens like estradiol, and prostate cancer, which is dependent on androgens like testosterone. ... Read »


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    • Vera Houghton

    • Vera Houghton, Baroness Houghton of Sowerby CBE (18 October 1914 - 30 November 2013) was a British women's health campaigner, chair of the Abortion Law Reform Association and founder of the Birth Control Trust. She was born Vera Travis in London on 18 October 1914 and educated at Haberdashers' Aske's School for Gi ... Read »


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    • Huntington's Disease Outreach Project for Education at Stanford


    • Hypofractionated high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    • This is an experimental form of intensity-modulated radiotherapy where higher X-ray dosages are used in fewer fractions (sessions). This is called hypofractionated radiotherapy. Although the dose per fraction is higher than standard radiotherapy, the total dose is lower. The hope is that it will be as effective but ca ... Read »


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    • Hypokalemic acidosis

    • Hypokalemic acidosis is a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis that has various direct and associated symptoms. Symptoms are associated with hypokalemia instead of hyperkalemia. The main causes of hypokalemic acidosis are systemic disorders that can be divided into: ... Read »


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    • Hypophalangism

    • Hypophalangism is a congenital absence of one or more phalanges (bones of the fingers and toes). ... Read »


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    • Iatrophysics

    • Iatrophysics or iatromechanics (fr. Greek) is the medical application of physics. It provides an explanation for medical practices with mechanical principles. It was a school of medicine in the seventeenth century which attempted to explain physiological phenomena in mechanical terms. Believers of iatromechanics though ... Read »


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    • ICECI

    • The International Classification of External Causes of Injury (ICECI) is a medical classification providing codes for external injuries. It is designed to aid professionals and researchers in the statistical tracking and prevention of injury. First released in 2001, the ICECI is a Related Classification in the WHO Fa ... Read »


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    • Immunome

    • The Immunome is the set of the genes and proteins that constitute the immune system. ... Read »


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    • Induced menopause

    • Induced menopause is menopause induced by medical treatment, intentionally or unintentionally. Some causes of induced menopause are: chemotherapy, radiotherapy, oophorectomy, or complications of tubal ligation, hysterectomy, unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy or Lupron usage. ... Read »


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    • John Scott Inkster

    • John Scott Inkster was a British anesthesiologist born in 1924, one of the first paediatric anaesthetists. He graduated from the University of Aberdeen in 1945. Inkster's interest in anesthesia started during his time as a house physician at New End Hospital. John Inkster discovered Positive end-expiratory pressure Jo ... Read »


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    • Institut de microbiologie et des maladies infectieuses

    • The Institut de microbiologie et des maladies infectieuses is a unit of the French national medical research institute INSERM. It is a member of GLOPID-R. ... Read »


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    • Intermediate Life Support

    • Intermediate Life Support (ILS) is a level of training undertaken in order to provide emergency medical care outside medical facilities. ILS is classed as mid-level emergency medical care provided by trained first responders who receive more training then Basic First Responders and First-aid providers. ILS contains s ... Read »


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    • International Classification of Procedures in Medicine

    • The International Classification of Procedures in Medicine (ICPM) was a system of classifying procedure codes published by the World Health Organization from 1978. Due to difficulties in the consultation processes, international development of the work effectively stopped in 1989. In the last few years, the WHO began ... Read »


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    • Interoceptor

    • An interoceptor is a sensory receptor that detects stimuli within the body. Examples of stimuli that would be detected by interoceptors include blood pressure and blood oxygen level. ... Read »


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    • IPERGAY

    • IPERGAY was a French clinical trial of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in sexually active gay men in a community setting. It demonstrated 86% effectiveness in preventing HIV transmission. The study was published in December 2015 looking at an alternative strategy of "on-demand" PrEP where Truvada was taken 2–24 h ... Read »


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    • Isotopes in medicine

    • A medical isotope is an isotope used in medicine. The first uses of isotopes in medicine were in radiopharmaceuticals, and this is still the most common use. However more recently, separated stable isotopes have also come into use. Examples of non-radioactive medical isotopes are: ... Read »


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    • Jinnah Hospital, Lahore

    • Jinnah Hospital, Lahore

      Jinnah Hospital (Urdu: جناح سپتال‎) (named after Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah founder of Pakistan) in Lahore is the second largestteaching hospital in the Pakistani province of Punjab spread over 105 acres (42 ha). The hospital is named after the founder of Pakistan, Muhammad Ali ... Read »


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    • Johns Hopkins Hospital Historical Club

    • The Johns Hopkins Hospital Historical Club was a society devoted to studying the history of medicine. Founded on 10 November 1890 by more than 30 people including William Osler, William H. Welch, William Stewart Halsted, and Howard A. Kelly, its first meeting was held at the library of the Johns Hopkins Hospital on 30 ... Read »


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    • Peter Kesling

    • Dr. Peter Kesling is an American Orthodontist known for the development of Tip Edge Orthodontic Appliance in 1986. He holds over 50 patents related to Orthodontic Appliances. He was born in La Porte, Indiana. Peter Kesling is son of Dr. Harold Kesling, who was also an Orthodontist and invented the Tooth Positioner ... Read »


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    • Kokko and Rector Model

    • The Kokko and Rector model is a theory explaining the mechanism of generation of a gradient in the inner medulla of the kidney. Unlike earlier theories explaining the mechanism using counter current mechanism (as is the case in the outer medulla), the driving force for salt reabsorption is stated to be urea accumulatio ... Read »


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    • Lauenstein projection

    • Lauenstein projection is a technique for positioning a patient for radiographic examination of the hip joint emphasizing the relationship of the femur to the acetabulum. The knee of the affected leg is flexed, and the thigh is drawn up to nearly a right angle. This is also called the frog-leg position. ... Read »


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    • Lewis lead

    • A Lewis Lead (also called the S5 lead) is a modified EKG lead used to detect atrial flutter waves when atrial flutter is suspected clinically, based on signs and symptoms, but is not definitely demonstrated on the standard 12 lead EKG. In order to create the Lewis Lead, the right arm electrode is moved to the manubrium ... Read »


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    • List of drugs by year of discovery

    • The following is a table with drugs organized by year of discovery. ... Read »


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    • Lundh's test


    • Malacia

    • Malacia is a combining form (especially a suffix) used in medical terminology to denote an abnormal "softening of the tissues". ... Read »


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    • MDsave

    • MDsave is an online platform that connects uninsured patients, health savings account holders, and high deductible health insurance patients with medical providers who offer pre-negotiated savings on medical services. MDsave offers medical providers a way to package their services into a single bundled procedure onlin ... Read »


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    • Med Flash

    • MedFlash is a portable personal health record storage device developed and sold by Connectyx Technologies in the United States. Its primary purpose is for transporting and maintaining personal health records. MedFlash is currently produced as a USB flash drive, and is sold in all US states. MedFlash has special in cas ... Read »


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    • Median alveolar cyst

    • The median alveolar cyst is a rare cyst, occurring in the bony alveolus between the maxillary central incisors. It is distinguished from a periapical cyst by the fact that adjacent teeth are vital. Treatment is by enucleation, or surgical removal. Sanjay Saraf (1 December 2008). Textbook of Oral Pathology. Jaypee Bro ... Read »


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    • Median palatal cyst

    • The median palatal cyst is a rare cyst that may occur anywhere along the median palatal raphe. It may produce swelling because of infection and is treated by excision or surgical removal. Some investigators now believe that this cyst represents a more posterior presentation of a nasopalatine duct cyst, rather than a s ... Read »


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    • Medical case management

    • Medical case management is a collaborative process that facilitates recommended treatment plans to assure the appropriate medical care is provided to disabled, ill or injured individuals. It is a role frequently overseen by patient advocates. It refers to the planning and coordination of health care services appropria ... Read »


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    • Medical fiction

    • Medical fiction is fiction whose events center upon a hospital, an ambulance staff, or any medical environment. It is highly prevalent on television, especially as medical dramas, as well as in novels. ... Read »


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    • Medical oddity

    • A medical oddity is an unusual predicament or event which takes place in a medical context. Some examples of medical oddities might include: "lost and found" surgical instruments (in the body), grotesquely oversized tumors, (human) male pregnancy, rare or "orphan" illnesses, rare allergies (such as to water), strange b ... Read »


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    • Medical paternalism

    • Medical paternalism is a term describing practices in medicine which were current in the early to mid 20th century, characterised by a paternalistic attitude, surrogate decision-making and a lack of respect for patient autonomy. It was associated with an autocratic style of medical education and practice memorably sati ... Read »


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    • Medical surveillance

    • Workplace health surveillance or occupational health surveillance (U.S.) is the ongoing systematic collection, analysis, and dissemination of exposure and health data on groups of workers. The Joint ILO/WHO Committee on Occupational Health at its 12th Session in 1995 defined an occupational health surveillance system a ... Read »


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    • Medicinal jar

    • A Medicinal jar or drug jar is a jar used to contain medicine. Medicinal jars used to be employed massively in apothecary shops in hospitals. Medicinal jars are an important category of the famous Dutch and English porcelain known as Delftware. A famous type of drug jar known as Albarello was derived from Islamic war ... Read »


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    • Medicine chest

    • A medicine chest is a container or cabinet for storing medicine. All ships governed by the regulations of the IMO are required to have medical supplies and suitable storage for them such as refrigeration and locks. In Canada medicine chest has a related, symbolic meaning. Under the terms of Treaty 6 between the Canadi ... Read »


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    • Medlar bodies

    • Medlar bodies, also known as sclerotic or muriform cells, are thick walled cells (5-12microns) with multiple internal transverse septa or chambers that resemble copper pennies. When present in skin or subcutaneous tissue, the cells are indicative of chromoblastomycosis. ... Read »


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    • Meriandra dianthera

    • Meriandra dianthera, commonly known as Bengal sage and Bengal salvia (hi:कफ़ूर का पात), is a plant with a mint flavor that is cultivated for medical purposes. ... Read »


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    • Mitrofanoff principle

    • In urology, the Mitrofanoff principle is the creation of a passageway for urine or enema fluid that, by its (surgical) construction, has a valve mechanism to allow continence. Procedures which make use of the Mitrofanoff principle: It is named after the French urologist (Mitrofanoff) who popularized it. ... Read »


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    • Morning report (medicine)

    • Morning Report is a morning teaching round for medical housestaff in North America. The content and time of the round vary between institutions. The round may occur at the beginning of the workday, or may occur after or in the middle of patient care rounds. The participants in the round vary as well, but usually inclu ... Read »


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    • Mouth infection

    • Mouth infections, also known as oral infections are a group of infections that occur around the oral cavity. They include dental infection, dental abscess, and Ludwig's angina. ""Mouth Infection"", "" Periodontitis"" is the most common bacterial mouth infection, infecting the gums and bone that hold your teeth. Disease ... Read »


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    • MRC-5

    • MRC-5 (Medical Research Council cell strain 5) is a diploid human cell culture line composed of fibroblasts derived from lung tissue of an 14 week old aborted caucasian male fetus. The cell line was isolated by J.P. Jacobs and colleagues in September 1966. MRC-5 cells are used to produce several vaccines including MM ... Read »


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    • Neurophysiotherapy

    • Neurophysiotherapy, or neurological physiotherapy, is a branch of physiotherapy which treats motor deficits arising from pathology in the nervous system. Dr Shakti Kumar (Consultant Physiotherapist) Specialist in Neurology and Spine Physiotherapy & CEO Shivalik Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Centre (Dugri) Ludhiana ... Read »


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    • Nexafed

    • Nexafed is a special formulation of pseudoephedrine developed by Acura Pharmaceuticals used to deter the use of the pseudoephedrine contained in the product for illicit methamphetamine synthesis. Nexafed uses a polymer matrix that forms a thick gel when hydrated, preventing the extraction of pseudoephedrine. Nexafed is ... Read »


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    • NHS Improvement

    • NHS Improvement is responsible for overseeing foundation trusts and NHS trusts, as well as independent providers that provide NHS-funded care. It supports providers to give patients consistently safe, high quality, compassionate care within local health systems that are financially sustainable. A previous body – a ... Read »


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    • Nodular parenchyma

    • Nodular parenchyma is a small mass of tissue within a gland or organ that carries out the specialized functions of the gland or organ.  This article incorporates public domain material from the U.S. National Cancer Institute document "Dictionary of Cancer Terms". ... Read »


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    • Normocapnia

    • Normocapnia or normocarbia is a state of normal arterial carbon dioxide pressure, usually about 40 mmHg. ... Read »


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    • Nose-blowing

    • Nose-blowing is the act of expelling nasal mucus by exhaling forcefully through the nose, usually into a facial tissue or handkerchief. In some cultures, blowing one's nose in public may be considered a breach of etiquette. Nose-blowing may be used to alleviate nasal congestion or rhinorrhea (runny nose). A 2000 study ... Read »


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    • Numerophobia

    • Numerophobia, arithmophobia or mathematics anxiety is a anxiety disorder, where the condition is fear of dealing with numbers or mathematics. Sometimes numerophobia refers to fear of particular numbers. ... Read »


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    • Nutrition physiology

    • Nutrition physiology deals with different types of food and their effects on the metabolism. One topic of nutrition physiology is vitamin loss of frozen foods. Another topic is the calculation of required calories per day and what sort of food should best be avoided for a healthy lifestyle. This can be looked at as the ... Read »


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    • Obstetric medicine

    • Obstetric medicine, sometimes maternal medicine, is a subspecialty of general internal medicine and obstetrics that specialises in the dealing with physical health problems in pregnant women. It is closely related to the specialty of maternal-fetal medicine, although obstetric medicine does not directly care for the fo ... Read »


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    • Occupational cardiovascular disease

    • Occupational cardiovascular disease is disease of the heart or blood vessels that are caused by working conditions, making them a form of occupational illness. Little is known about occupational risks for heart disease, but links have been established between cardiovascular disease and certain toxins (including carbon ... Read »


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    • Occupational epidemiology

    • Occupational epidemiology is one of the sub-disciplines of epidemiology that focus on investigations on workers and the workplace. Occupational epidemiologic studies examine a variety of health outcomes among workers and their potential association with a variety of conditions in the workplace (such as noise, chemical ... Read »


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    • Olbas Oil

    • Olbas Oil is a remedy, of Swiss origin, for congestion in the chest and nose, some hayfever relief (in certain cases) and also for muscle ache via massage. It is made from a mixture of several different essential oils. There are several trademarked olbas oil products available Active ingredients are listed as; ... Read »


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    • Otitis

    • Otitis

      Otitis is a general term for inflammation or infection of the ear, in both humans and other animals. It is subdivided into the following: ... Read »


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    • Otology

    • Otology is a branch of medicine which studies normal and pathological anatomy and physiology of the ear (hearing and vestibular sensory systems and related structures and functions) as well as their diseases, diagnosis and treatment. Otologic surgery generally refers to surgery of the middle ear and mastoid related to ... Read »


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    • Paracelsianism

    • Paracelsianism (also Paracelsism; German Paracelsismus) was an early modern medical movement based on the theories and therapies of Paracelsus. It developed in the second half of the 16th century, during the decades following Paracelsus' death in 1541, and it flourished during the first half of the 17th century, repres ... Read »


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    • Paroniria

    • Paroniria is a medical condition involving an excess of morbid dreams and nightmares. Paroniria is suspected to have many causes, including fear, stress, depression, trauma, and sleep deprivation, among others. ... Read »


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    • Patellar tap

    • The patellar tap is a technique used in an examination of the knee to test for knee effusion or "water-on-the-knee". With the examinee lying on their back, the examiner extends the knee and presses the area above the kneecap with the palm of one hand. This pushes fluid under the kneecap and lifts it. While keeping the ... Read »


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    • Pediatric neurosurgery

    • Pediatric Neurosurgery is a subspecialty of neurosurgery (surgical procedures that are related to the human nervous system, brain, spinal cord, etc.) that treats children with operable nervous system diseases. ... Read »


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    • Phenotype (clinical medicine)

    • In a nosological sense, the term phenotype can be used in clinical medicine for speaking about the presentation of a disease. The complementary concept in this regard is endotype, which refers to the pathogenesis of the disease ignoring its presentation. In this context, a phenotype would be any observable characteris ... Read »


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    • Phoniatrics

    • Phoniatrics or phoniatry is the study and treatment of organs involved in speech production, mainly the mouth, throat (larynx), vocal cords, and lungs. Problems treated in phoniatrics include dysfunction of the vocal cords, cancer of the vocal cords or larynx, inability to control the speech organs properly (speech dis ... Read »


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    • PICO process

    • The PICO process is a technique used in evidence based practice to frame and answer a clinical or health care related question. The PICO framework is also used to develop literature search strategies. The PICO acronym stands for ... Read »


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    • Point of care medical information summary

    • Point of care medical information summaries are defined as "web-based medical compendia specifically designed to deliver predigested, rapidly accessible, comprehensive, periodically updated, and evidence-based information" to healthcare providers. ... Read »


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    • Portography

    • Portography is a radiography of the portal vein after injection of radioopaque contrast material. ... Read »


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    • Pre-hospital emergency medicine

    • Pre-hospital emergency medicine

      Pre-hospital emergency medicine (abbreviated PHEM) is a medical speciality which focuses on caring for seriously ill or injured patients before they reach hospital, and during emergency transfer to hospital or between hospitals. It is primarily a subspecialty of emergency medicine, but may also be practised by physicia ... Read »


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    • President's Malaria Initiative


    • Prognosis marker

    • Prognosis markers in Cancers Prognosis markers are used to determine the progress of the disease in a patient sample. The widely used prognostic markers in Cancers are Stages, Size, Grade, Node and Metastasis. Irrespective of these common markers, there are also prognostic markers specific to a cancer type. For exampl ... Read »


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    • Prolonged labour

    • Prolonged labour is when the total duration of childbirth is greater than 24 hours. There are two main types, one when the latent phase of labour is greater than 8 hours and the other when the active phase of labour is greater than 12 hours. The cause can be due to: poor uterine contractions, the baby's position or si ... Read »


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    • Prostatic artery embolization

    • Prostatic artery embolization (or prostate artery embolisation) is a new/experimental treatment for benign prostatic hypertrophy. The procedure involves blocking small prostatic arteries using microparticles injected via microcatheters. It is a minimally invasive procedure which can be performed under local anaesthesi ... Read »


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    • PROUD (clinical trial)

    • PROUD (a backronym for "Pre-exposure Option for reducing HIV in the UK: immediate or Deferred") was an open-label randomised clinical trial of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) by the MRC Clinical Trials Unit at University College London. It sought to evaluate the effectiveness of PrEP at preventing the spread of HIV in ... Read »


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    • Psychotoxicity

    • Psychotoxicity in pharmacology is the effect when a drug interferes seriously with normal behaviour. ... Read »


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    • Béla Rákosi


    • Rapid antigen test

    • A rapid antigen test (RAT) or rapid antigen detection test (RADT) is a rapid diagnostic test suitable for point-of-care testing that directly detects the presence or absence of an antigen. This distinguishes it from other medical tests that detect antibodies (antibody tests) or nucleic acid (nucleic acid tests), of eit ... Read »


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    • Rapid organ recovery ambulance

    • A rapid organ recovery ambulance is "a special ambulance to collect the bodies of people who have died suddenly from heart attacks, accidents and other emergencies and try to preserve their organs."New York City is launching a pilot program deploying one such ambulance with a $1.5 million, three-year grant. ... Read »


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    • Referral (medicine)

    • In medicine, referral is the transfer of care for a patient from one clinician to another. Tertiary care is usually done by referral from primary or secondary medical care personnel. In the field of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), referral also means the informing of a partner of a patient diagnosed STD of the ... Read »


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    • Reflex locomotion

    • Reflex locomotion, usually referred to as the Vojta method, is the technique for the treatment of physical and mental impairment in humans. It was discovered by Václav Vojta. Based on studies of treatments for spastic children for muscular disorders in the 1950s, a number of reflex points were identified which can ... Read »


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    • Relax-A-Cizor

    • Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS), also known as neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or electromyostimulation, is the elicitation of muscle contraction using electric impulses. EMS has received an increasing amount of attention in the last few years for many reasons: it can be utilized as a strength training ... Read »


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    • Response rate (medicine)

    • In medicine, a response rate is the percentage of patients whose cancer shrinks or disappears after treatment. When used as a clinical endpoint for clinical trials of cancer treatments, this often called the objective response rate (ORR). The FDA definition of ORR is "the proportion of patients with tumor size reduc ... Read »


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    • Rhinology

    • Otorhinolaryngology /oʊtoʊˌraɪnoʊˌlærənˈɡɒlədʒi/ (also called otolaryngology-head and neck surgery) is a surgical subspecialty within medicine that deals with conditions of the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) and related structures of the head and neck. Doctors who specialize in this ... Read »


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    • Rhotacism (speech impediment)

    • In medical contexts, rhotacism (pronunciation: /ˈroʊtəsɪzəm/) is the inability to pronounce or difficulty in pronouncing the sound r. Thus, many speech pathologists call this problem de-rhotacization, because the sounds lose their rhotic quality rather than becoming rhotic. The rhotic sounds are usually ... Read »


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    • Risk of mortality

    • The risk of mortality (ROM) provides a medical classification to estimate the likelihood of inhospital death for a patient. The ROM classes are minor, moderate, major, and extreme. The ROM class is used for the evaluation of patient mortality. ... Read »


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    • SAPS III

    • SAPS III is a system for predicting mortality, one of several ICU scoring systems. Its name stands for "Simplified Acute Physiology Score" and is a supplement to the SAPS II scoring system. It has been designed to provide a real-life predicted mortality for a patient by following a well defined procedure, based on a ma ... Read »


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    • Julius Schreiber

    • Julius Schreiber (28 February 1848 in Schrimm – 18 September 1932 in Königsberg) was a German internist. In 1875, he received his medical doctorate from the University of Königsberg, obtaining his habilitation for internal medicine two years later as a student of Bernhard Naunyn. In 1878 he worked as assist ... Read »


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    • Seminars in Perinatology

    • Seminars in Perinatology is a bimonthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering perinatology. It was established in 1977 and is published by Elsevier. The editors-in-chief are Ian Gross (Yale School of Medicine) and Mary E. D'alton (Columbia University Medical Center). According to the Journal Citation Reports, the jour ... Read »


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    • Sensory trick

    • A geste antagoniste is a physical gesture or position (such as touching one's chin) which serves to temporarily interrupt dystonia. Patients may be aware of the presence of a geste antagoniste which provides some relief from their symptoms. Therapy for dystonia can involve prosthetics which provide passive simulation ... Read »


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    • Sequence (medicine)

    • In medicine, a sequence is a series of ordered consequences due to a single cause. It differs from a syndrome in that seriality is more predictable: if A causes B, and B causes C, and C causes D, then D would not be seen if C is not seen. However, in less formal contexts, the term "syndrome" is sometimes used instead ... Read »


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    • Sialocele

    • A sialocele is a localized, subcutaneous cavity containing saliva. It is caused by trauma (e.g. violence, accident or surgery) or infection. They most commonly develop about 8–14 days after injury. They are a relatively common complication following surgery to the salivary glands, commonly parotidectomy (removal ... Read »


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    • Signal-regulatory protein

    • A Signal-regulatory protein (SIRP) is one of a family of transmembrane glycoproteins involved in immunological signalling, expressed mainly by myeloid cells. Members include : ... Read »


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    • Slendertone

    • Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS), also known as neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or electromyostimulation, is the elicitation of muscle contraction using electric impulses. EMS has received increasing attention in the last few years because of its potential to serve as a strength training tool for healthy ... Read »


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    • Spinal Cord Toolbox

    • The Spinal Cord Toolbox (SCT) is a suite of analysis tools optimized for spinal cord images acquired with magnetic resonance imaging. Main features include segmentation, registration and calculation of anatomical metrics. ... Read »


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    • Sports physical examination

    • A sports physical exam or sports physical is a physical examination performed on those entering into a sport. The purpose is to ensure the participant is safe to participate. Special concerns for sport/athletics participation: ... Read »


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    • Subcutaneous implant

    • In medicine, a subcutaneous implant, or subcutaneous pellet, is an implant that is surgically delivered under the skin into the subcutaneous tissue and is used to deliver a drug for a long period of time. Examples of drugs that can be administered in this way include leuprorelin and the sex steroids estradiol and testo ... Read »


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    • Subspecialty

    • A subspecialty or subspeciality (British English) is a narrow field within a specialty such as forensic pathology, which is a subspecialty of anatomical pathology. A subspecialist is a specialist of a subspecialty. In medicine, subspecialization is particularly common in internal medicine, cardiology, and neurology, a ... Read »


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    • Surgical smoke

    • Surgical smoke is the gaseous by-product produced by electrosurgery, laser tissue ablation, ultrasonic scalpel dissection, high speed drilling or burring, or any procedure done by means of a surgical device that is used to ablate, cut, coagulate, desiccate, fulgurate, or vaporize tissue. Other names for surgical smoke ... Read »


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    • Tactical combat casualty care

    • Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC or TC3) is — a standard of care in Prehospital Battlefield Medicine. The TCCC Guidelines are routinely updated and published by the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC). TCCC was designed in the mid-'90s for the Special Operations medical community. Originally ... Read »


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    • Tactical Emergency Medical Services

    • Tactical Emergency Medical Services (TEMS) is out-of-hospital care given in hostile situations by specially trained practitioners. It is distinct from the care given by medics in , as TEMS generally refers to care rendered by civilians. Tactical Medics are Emergency medical technicians (EMT), paramedics, nurses, and ph ... Read »


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    • Tardive

    • Tardive refers to something that is late in appearing. For example, the characteristic symptom of a disease, such as a lesion, may occur a long period after exposure. A tardive symptom could be contrasted with an acute symptom, which appears soon after injury or exposure to disease, although it may also mean a symptom ... Read »


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