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    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Japanese home

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    • Houses in Japan

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Houses in Japan


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    • Butsudan

    • A Butsudan, sometimes spelled Butudan (仏壇?, literally "Buddhist altar"), is a shrine commonly found in temples and homes in Japanese Buddhist cultures. A butsudan is either a defined, often ornate platform or simply a wooden cabinet sometimes crafted with doors that enclose and protect a Gohonzon or religious ... Read »


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    • Chabudai

    • A chabudai ( or or ?) is a short-legged table used in traditional Japanese homes. The original chabudai ranged in height from just 15 cm to a maximum height of 30 cm. People seated at a chabudai may sit on zabuton or tatami rather than on chairs. The four legs of a chabudai are generally collapsible so that the table ... Read »


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    • Furo

    • Furo (風呂?), the more common and polite form: ofuro (お風呂?), is a Japanese bath. Specifically it is a type of bath which originated as a short, steep-sided wooden bathtub. Baths of this type are found all over Japan in houses, apartments and traditional Japanese inns (ryokans) but are now usually ... Read »


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    • Fusuma

    • In Japanese architecture, fusuma (Japanese: 襖?) are vertical rectangular panels which can slide from side to side to redefine spaces within a room, or act as doors. They typically measure about 91.5 centimetres (3.00 ft) wide by 183 centimetres (6.00 ft) tall, the same size as a tatami mat, and are two or th ... Read »


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    • Futon

    • A futon (布団?) is traditional Japanese bedding comprising a quilted mattress that is usually laid on the floor. A bedding set consists of both a mattress (敷き布団, shikibuton?, lit. "spreading futon") and a duvet (掛け布団, kakebuton?, lit. "covering futon"), although the word ... Read »


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    • Futon dryer

    • A Futon dryer (布団乾燥機, futonkansōki?) is an electric device that warms and dries a Japanese futon by forcing warm air through it. A futon dryer works by drawing in air with an electric fan and heating it, and then forcing it into a large cloth pouch. The pouch is usually inserted between ... Read »


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    • Genkan

    • Genkan (?) are traditional Japanese entryway areas for a house, apartment, or building—something of a combination of a porch and a doormat. The primary function of genkan is for the removal of shoes before entering the main part of the house or building. Genkan are often recessed into the floor, to contain any dir ... Read »


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    • Getabako

    • A getabako (下駄箱?) is a shoe cupboard in Japan, usually situated in the genkan, an entryway or porch of the house. In Japan, it is considered uncouth to not remove one's shoes before entering the house. Near the getabako is a slipper rack, and most people in Japan wear slippers around the house, except fo ... Read »


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    • Homelessness in Japan

    • As of 2009, Homelessness in Japan increased sharply due to the rise in unemployment. As of 2014, the number of homeless people in Tokyo reached a record low, only about 1,697 people or one person for every 10,000 city inhabitants. At the beginning of the 1990s, the homeless in Japan were viewed as a nuisance. The ... Read »


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    • Irori

    • An irori (いろり, 囲炉裏, 居炉裏) is a traditional Japanese sunken hearth. Used for heating the home and for cooking food, it is essentially a square, stone-lined pit in the floor, equipped with an adjustable pothook – called a jizaikagi (自在鉤) and generally consis ... Read »


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    • Japanese Homes and Their Surroundings

    • Japanese Homes and their Surroundings is a book by Edward S. Morse describing and illustrating the construction of Japanese homes. It was first published in 1886 after its author had spent three years in Japan studying and teaching zoology. It contains numerous drawings by Morse of various features of Japanese houses, ... Read »


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    • Kamidana

    • Kamidana (神棚, kami-dana?, lit. "god-shelf") are miniature household altars provided to enshrine a Shinto kami. They are most commonly found in Japan, the home of kami worship. The kamidana is typically placed high on a wall and contains a wide variety of items related to Shinto-style ceremonies, the most pro ... Read »


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    • Kamiza

    • Kamiza (上座?) is the Japanese language term referring to the "top seat" within a room, meaning the place of honor; the term also applies to the best seats in air-planes, trains, and cars. The antonym, meaning "bottom seat," is shimoza (下座). In a room, the kamiza is the seat or position that is most c ... Read »


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    • Japanese kitchen

    • The Japanese kitchen (Japanese: 台所, translit. Daidokoro, lit. 'kitchen') is the place where food is prepared in a Japanese house. Until the Meiji era, a kitchen was also called kamado (かまど; lit. stove) and there are many sayings in the Japanese language that involve kamado as it was consi ... Read »


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    • Kotatsu

    • A kotatsu (炬燵?) is a low, wooden table frame covered by a futon, or heavy blanket, upon which a table top sits. Underneath is a heat source, formerly a charcoal brazier but now electric, often built into the table itself. Kotatsu are used almost exclusively in Japan, although similar devices are used elsewher ... Read »


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    • Minka

    • Minka (民家, literally "house of the people"?) are vernacular houses constructed in any one of several traditional Japanese building styles. In the context of the four divisions of society, minka were the dwellings of farmers, artisans, and merchants (i.e., the three non-samurai castes). This connotation no lon ... Read »


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    • Shōji


    • Sudare

    • Sudare (ç°¾ or すだれ?) are screens or blinds. They are sometimes called misu (御簾 or みす?) as well, particularly if they have a green fabric hem.Sudare are made of horizontal slats of decorative wood, bamboo, or other natural material woven together with simple string, colored yarn, or ... Read »


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    • Tansu

    • Tansu (箪笥?) is the traditional mobile storage cabinetry indigenous to Japan. Tansu was first recorded in the Genroku era of the Edo Period (1688–1704). The two characters, TAN and SU, appear to have initially represented objects with separate functions: the storage of food and the carrying of firewood. S ... Read »


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    • Tatami

    • A tatami (畳?) is a type of mat used as a flooring material in traditional Japanese-style rooms. Traditionally made using rice straw to form the core, the cores of contemporary tatami are sometimes composed of compressed wood chip boards or polystyrene foam. With a covering of woven soft rush (igusa 藺草) s ... Read »


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    • Toilets in Japan

    • Toilets in Japan are generally more elaborate than toilets in other developed nations. There are two styles of toilets commonly found in Japan; the oldest type is a simple squat toilet, which is still common in public conveniences. After World War II, modern Western-type flush toilets and urinals became common. The cur ... Read »


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    • Tokonoma

    • Tokonoma (床の間, toko-no-ma?), or simply toko (床), is a built-in recessed space in a Japanese style reception room, in which items for artistic appreciation are displayed. In English, tokonoma is usually called alcove. Tokonoma first appeared in the late Muromachi period (14th–16th century). ... Read »


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    • Washitsu

    • Washitsu (和室?), meaning "Japanese-style room(s)", and frequently called in English a "tatami room", is a Japanese term used to describe a room in a house or apartment that has traditional tatami flooring.Washitsu also usually have sliding doors (fusuma), rather than hinged doors between rooms. They may have s ... Read »


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    • Zabuton

    • A Zabuton (座布団) is a Japanese cushion for sitting. The zabuton is generally used when sitting on the floor and may also be used when sitting on a chair. In a more casual setting, the zabuton can be used in conjunction with a zaisu (座椅子?), a type of Japanese legless chair, with or without a ... Read »


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    • Zaisu

    • A zaisu (座椅子?) is a Japanese chair with no legs but a normal chair back. They are often found in traditional rooms with tatami mats, and are perfect for relaxing under heated kotatsu tables. Traditionally, the correct sitting style in Japan is seiza, kneeling with the weight on top of the lower legs, wh ... Read »


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