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  • Humour

    Humour

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    • Humour by country

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    • April Fools' Day


    • Comedy and humor awards

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    • Ironic and humorous awards

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    • Comedy

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    • Ethnic humor

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    • Fabliaux

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    • Homophonic translation

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    • Humor and wit characters

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    • Humor research

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    • Humorists

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    • Islamic comedy and humor

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    • Jewish comedy and humor

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    • Jokes

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    • Laughter

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    • LGBT comedy and humour

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about LGBT comedy and humour


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    • Humor-related lists

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    • Humor media

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    • Mondegreens

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    • Music and humour

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    • Off-color humor

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    • Professional humor

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    • Puns

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    • Satire

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    • Unofficial observances

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    • Word play

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    • Absence paradox

    • The absence paradox, while named a paradox, is more precisely an informal fallacy and humorous misuse of language which results in the conclusion that "No one is ever present." The statement of the argument is some formulation of the following: But this does not make sense. The use of this fallacy dates from the 19th ... Read »


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    • Akanbe

    • Akanbe (あかんべえ, Akanbee?), also spelled Akkanbee (あっかんべー, アッカンベー?), is a Japanese facial gesture indicating crazy sarcasm, also known in France as mon œil. It consists of someone pulling down one's lower eyelid to expose the red unde ... Read »


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    • Aldwych farce

    • The Aldwych farces were a series of twelve stage farces presented at the Aldwych Theatre, London, nearly continuously from 1923 to 1933. All but three of them were written by Ben Travers. They incorporate and develop British low comedy styles, combined with clever word-play. The plays were presented by the actor-manage ... Read »


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    • Am I Right

    • Am I Right

      AmIRight is a popular music Web site created by Charles R. Grosvenor Jr. (born July 7, 1972, known as Chucky G). Visitors can view sections based on such topics as song parodies, misheard lyrics (mondegreens), and album cover parodies, and can submit their own without registering. The site was first launched March 23, ... Read »


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    • Amusement

    • Amusement is the state of experiencing humorous and entertaining events or situations while the person or animal actively maintains the experience, and is associated with enjoyment, happiness, laughter and pleasure. Current studies have not yet reached consensus on the exact purpose of amusement, though theories have ... Read »


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    • Anti-Barney humor

    • Anti-Barney humor is a form of humor that targets the children's television series Barney & Friends. The notion that the show is "saccharine", "boring", "annoying", "sugary", "dangerous" or "uneducational" has made the program a target for parody and negative attacks by children of various ages, adolescents, and adults ... Read »


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    • Anti-humor

    • Anti-humor is a type of indirect humor that involves the joke-teller delivering something which is intentionally not funny, or lacking in intrinsic meaning. The practice relies on the expectation on the part of the audience of something humorous, and when this does not happen, the irony itself is of comedic value. Anti ... Read »


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    • Anti-proverb

    • An anti-proverb or a perverb is the transformation of a standard proverb for humorous effect. Paremiologist Wolfgang Mieder defines them as "parodied, twisted, or fractured proverbs that reveal humorous or satirical speech play with traditional proverbial wisdom". They have also been defined as "an allusive distortion, ... Read »


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    • Apples and oranges

    • A comparison of apples and oranges occurs when two items or groups of items are compared that cannot be practically compared. The idiom, comparing apples and oranges, refers to the apparent differences between items which are popularly thought to be incomparable or incommensurable, such as apples and oranges. The idio ... Read »


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    • Augustine's laws


    • Bathos

    • Bathos (/ˈbeɪθɒs/ BAY-thoss;Greek: , lit. "depth") is a literary term, first coined by Alexander Pope in his 1727 essay "Peri Bathous", to describe amusingly failed attempts at sublimity (i.e., pathos). In particular, bathos is associated with anticlimax, an abrupt transition from a lofty style or grand ... Read »


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    • Black comedy

    • Black comedy or dark comedy is a comic style that makes light of subjects that are generally considered serious or taboo. Literary critics such as Blake Hobby at the University of North Carolina have associated black comedy and black humor with authors as early as the ancient Greeks with Aristophanes. Black comedy corr ... Read »


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    • Board of Inland Revenue v Haddock

    • Board of Inland Revenue v Haddock (also known as the negotiable cow) is a fictitious legal case written by the humorist A. P. Herbert for Punch magazine as part of his series of Misleading Cases in the Common Law. It was first published in book form in More Misleading Cases in the Common Law (Methuen, 1930). The case e ... Read »


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    • Burlesque

    • Burlesque is a literary, dramatic or musical work intended to cause laughter by caricaturing the manner or spirit of serious works, or by ludicrous treatment of their subjects. The word derives from the Italian burlesco, which, in turn, is derived from the Italian burla – a joke, ridicule or mockery. Burlesque ov ... Read »


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    • Buttered cat paradox

    • The buttered cat paradox is a common joke based on the tongue-in-cheek combination of two adages: The paradox arises when one considers what would happen if one attached a piece of buttered toast (butter side up) to the back of a cat, then dropped the cat from a large height. The buttered cat paradox, submitted by art ... Read »


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    • Cacography

    • Cacography is deliberate comic misspelling, a type of humour similar to malapropism. The term in the sense of "poor spelling, accentuation, and punctuation" is a semantic antonym to orthography, and in the sense of "poor handwriting" it is an etymological antonym to the word calligraphy: cacography is from Greek κ ... Read »


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    • Captain Obvious

    • Captain Obvious is a name invoked in conversation to draw attention to a self-evident fact. The phrase uses "captain" in the sense of a comicbook super-heroes. Somebody might say "Thank you, Captain Obvious!" to sarcastically thank someone who had just stated something self-evident. The Hotels.com website has a charac ... Read »


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    • Caption contest

    • A caption contest or caption competition is a competition between multiple participants, who are required to give the best description for a certain image offered by the contest organizer. Rules and information about the competition process are also given by the competition organizer. Caption contest participants ... Read »


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    • Caustic humour

    • Caustic humour is a type of humour which relies on witty insults. As is implied by the name (which literally means humour which is designed to burn or to corrode), it involves the clever use of language to convey biting, insulting, or sometimes even cruel remarks. This kind of humour is often attributed to such comedi ... Read »


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    • Chestnut (joke)

    • Chestnut is a British slang term for an old joke, often as old chestnut. The term is also used for a piece of music in the repertoire that has grown stale or hackneyed with too much repetition. A plausible explanation for the term given by the Oxford English Dictionary is that it originates from a play named "The Brok ... Read »


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    • Cockney Alphabet

    • The Cockney Alphabet, also known as the Surrealist Alphabet, is a humorous recital of the alphabet, parodying the way the alphabet is taught to small children. The humour comes from forming unexpected words and phrases from the names of the various letters of the alphabet. In the 1930s, the comedy double act Clapham a ... Read »


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    • Coffin races

    • Coffin races or coffin racing is a sports in which the contestants compete in delivering a coffin from start to finish; rules vary. The town of Manitou Springs Colorado, USA decided "to put 'fun' into funeral" in 1994 while looking for ideas to boost tourism. The Emma Crawford Memorial Coffin Races was based on a loca ... Read »


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    • Cognitive humor processing

    • Cognitive humor processing refers to the neural circuitry and pathways that are involved in detecting incongruities of various situations presented in a humorous manner. Over the past decade, many studies have emerged utilizing fMRI studies to describe the neural correlates associated with how a human processes somethi ... Read »


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    • Crackpot index

    • The crackpot index is a number that rates scientific claims or the individuals that make them, in conjunction with a method for computing that number. The method, proposed semi-seriously by mathematical physicist John C. Baez in 1992, computes an index by responses to a list of 36 questions, each positive response cont ... Read »


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    • Cringe comedy

    • Cringe comedy is a specific genre of comedy that derives humor from social awkwardness. Often a cringe comedy will have an air of a mockumentary and revolve around a serious setting, such as a workplace, to lend the comedy a sense of reality. It could be argued, therefore, that the film This Is Spinal Tap (1984) was a ... Read »


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    • Dad joke

    • "Dad joke" is a pejorative term used to describe a corny, unfunny, or predictable joke, typically a pun. Generally inoffensive, dad jokes are traditionally told by fathers among family, either with sincere humorous intent, or to intentionally provoke a negative reaction to its "dagginess". One of the most common "dad j ... Read »


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    • Dajare

    • Dajare (?, "wordplay") is a kind of comic Japanese word play, similar in spirit to a pun that relies on similarities in the pronunciation of words to create a simple joke. Dajare are popular in advertising. Dajare are also associated with oyaji gags (親父ギャグ, oyaji gyagu?), oyaji meaning "old ma ... Read »


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    • Deadpan

    • Deadpan or dry humor/wit describes the act of deliberately displaying a lack of or no emotion, commonly as a form of comedic delivery to contrast with the ridiculousness of the subject matter. The delivery is meant to be blunt, sarcastic, laconic, or apparently unintentional. The term deadpan first emerged as an a ... Read »


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    • Détournement


    • Doenjang Girl

    • Doenjang girl or Doenjang woman (hangul:된장녀) is a satirical expression used in South Korea "for their propensity to scrimp on essentials so they can over-spend on conspicuous luxuries". These girls and young women are addicted to luxury and vanity. The Hangul spelling is Doenjang Nyeo (된장녀 ... Read »


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    • Dog Latin

    • Dog Latin, also known as Cod Latin, macaronic Latin, mock Latin, or Canis Latinicus, refers to the creation of a phrase or jargon in imitation of Latin, often by "translating" English words (or those of other languages) into Latin by conjugating or declining them as if they were Latin words. Unlike the similarly named ... Read »


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    • The Dozens

    • The Dozens is a game of spoken words between two contestants, common in Black communities of the United States, where participants insult each other until one gives up. It is customary for the Dozens to be played in front of an audience of bystanders, who encourage the participants to reply with more egregious insults ... Read »


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    • Evil laughter

    • Evil laughter or maniacal laughter is a stock manic laughter by a villain in fiction. The expression "evil laugh" dates back to at least 1860. "Wicked laugh" can be found even earlier, dating back to at least 1784. Another variant, the "sardonic laugh," shows up in 1714 and might date back even further. In comic books ... Read »


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    • Externism

    • Externism is a fictional philosophical theory proposed by the fictional Czech genius Jára Cimrman. This character appears in many plays by authors from the Jára Cimrman Theatre in Prague. The first act of the theatre performances is usually filled with a lecture on Cimrman's personality, followed by a theatrical ... Read »


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    • Fart lighting

    • Fart lighting, also known as pyroflatulence or flatus ignition, is the practice of igniting the gases produced by human flatulence, often producing a flame of a blue hue, hence the act being known colloquially as a "blue angel", "blue dart", or in Australia, a "blue flame". The fact that flatus is flammable, and the ac ... Read »


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    • Gag name

    • A gag name is a false name used to elicit humour through its simultaneous resemblance to a real name on the one hand, and to a term or phrase that is funny, strange, or vulgar on the other hand. The source of the humour is the pun and double entendre; frequently, the humour arises when an unknowing victim is induced to ... Read »


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    • Gallows humor

    • Gallows humor is humor about very unpleasant, serious, or painful circumstances. Any humor that treats serious matters, such as death, war, disease, and crime, in a light, silly or satirical fashion is considered gallows humor. Gallows humor has been described as a witticism in response to a hopeless situation. It aris ... Read »


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    • Grotesque body

    • The grotesque body is a concept, or literary trope, put forward by Russian literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin in his study of François Rabelais' work. The essential principle of grotesque realism is degradation, the lowering of all that is abstract, spiritual, noble, and ideal to the material level. Through the use of ... Read »


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    • Hāsya


    • Helen (unit)

    • A helen is a humorous unit of measurement based on the concept that Helen of Troy, from the Iliad, had a "face that launched a thousand ships". The helen is thus used to measure quantities of beauty in terms of the theoretical action that could be accomplished by the wielder of such beauty. The classic reference t ... Read »


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    • Humor styles

    • Humor styles are a topic of research in the field of personality psychology related to the ways in which individuals differ in their use of humor in everyday life. People of all ages and backgrounds engage in humor, but the way they use it can vary greatly. Although humor styles can vary slightly depending on the situa ... Read »


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    • Humorous Interpretation

    • Humorous Interpretation (often shortened to "Humorous Interp", "HI", or simply "Humor") is an event in competitive middle and high school forensics leagues such as the National Christian Forensics and Communications Association and the National Forensic League. It consists of a piece from any published work, edited to ... Read »


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    • Humour

    • Humour (or humor in American English) is the tendency of particular cognitive experiences to provoke laughter and provide amusement. The term derives from the humoral medicine of the ancient Greeks, which taught that the balance of fluids in the human body, known as humours (Latin: humor, "body fluid"), controlled huma ... Read »


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    • Humour in translation

    • Humour in translation can be caused by translation errors, because of irregularities and discrepancies between certain items that translators attempt to translate. This could be due to the ignorance of the translator, as well as the untranslatability of the text as a result of linguistic or cultural differences. In add ... Read »


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    • Inherently funny word

    • Certain nonsense words may be inherently funny, according to a 2015 study published in the Journal of Memory and Language. The study's lead author, Chris Westbury from the University of Alberta, suggests that the inherent humor of certain non-words can be explained by the property of entropy. Entropy, in this case, exp ... Read »


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    • Invisible Pink Unicorn

    • The Invisible Pink Unicorn (IPU) is the goddess of a parody religion used to satirize theistic beliefs, taking the form of a unicorn that is paradoxically both invisible and pink. She is a rhetorical illustration used by atheists and other religious skeptics as a contemporary version of Russell's teapot, sometimes ment ... Read »


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    • Irony

    • Irony (from Ancient Greek εἰρωνεία (eirōneía), meaning "dissimulation, feigned ignorance"), in its broadest sense, is a rhetorical device, literary technique, or event in which what appears, on the surface, to be the case, differs radically from what is actually the case. Irony may be di ... Read »


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    • Isla Presidencial

    • Isla presidencial (Spanish: Presidential island) is a adult web animation page from Venezuela. It includes parodies of the presidents and politicians of Latin America and Spain, stranded in a paradise island. Several presidents met at the 74º Ibero-American Summit, and have a cruise after it. The cruise crashes ... Read »


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    • Asad Jafri

    • Asad Jafri (full name, Asghar Ali Asad Jafri, اصغر علی اسد جعفری, born on 3 June in 1935) is an educationist and poet (Urdu poetry) from Bhakkar in Punjab, Pakistan. He has written three books on serious and humorous poetry. Two books' titles are Khanda Navazi and Tera hansn ... Read »


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    • Jest book

    • Jest books (or Jestbooks) are collections of jokes and humorous anecdotes in book form - a literary genre which reached its greatest importance in the early modern period. The oldest surviving collection of jokes is the Byzantine Philogelos from the first millennium. In Western Europe, the medieval fabliau and the ... Read »


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    • Joke

    • A joke is a display of humour in which words are used within a specific and well-defined narrative structure to make people laugh. It takes the form of a story, usually with dialogue, and ends in a punch line. It is in the punch line that the audience becomes aware that the story contains a second, conflicting meaning. ... Read »


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    • Joke chess problem

    • Joke chess problems are puzzles in chess which use humor as a primary or secondary element. Although most chess problems, like other creative forms, are appreciated for serious artistic themes (Grimshaw, Novotny, and Lacny), joke chess problems are enjoyed for some twist. In some cases the composer plays a trick to pre ... Read »


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    • Kuso

    • Kuso is the term used in East Asia for the internet culture that generally includes all types of camp and parody. In Japanese, kuso (糞,くそ?) means "crap" or "shit" and "bullshit", and is often uttered as an interjection. It is also used to describe outrageous matters and objects of poor quality. This defi ... Read »


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    • Lapalissade

    • A lapalissade is an obvious truth—i.e. a truism or tautology—which produces a comical effect. It is derived from the name Jacques de la Palice, and the word is used in several languages. La Palice's epitaph reads These words were misread (accidentally or intentionally) as "...il Å¿erait [serait] encore en ... Read »


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    • Li's field


    • Manualism (hand music)

    • Manualism is the art of playing music by squeezing air through the hands. Because the sound produced has a distinctly flatulent tone, such music is usually presented as a form of musical comedy or parody. The musical performer is called a , who may perform a cappella or with instrumental accompaniment. Playing recogni ... Read »


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    • Mathematical fallacy

    • In mathematics, certain kinds of mistaken proof are often exhibited, and sometimes collected, as illustrations of a concept of mathematical fallacy. There is a distinction between a simple mistake and a mathematical fallacy in a proof: a mistake in a proof leads to an invalid proof just in the same way, but in the best ... Read »


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    • Microphone gaffe

    • A microphone gaffe, sometimes referred to as an open microphone (in aviation, a stuck mic) or a hot mic, is an apparent error whereby a microphone is switched on in proximity of a subject who is unaware that their remarks are being broadcast. The error allows unintended listeners to hear parts of private conversations. ... Read »


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    • Minsky's Burlesque


    • Mondegreen

    • A mondegreen /ˈmɒndᵻɡriːn/ is a mishearing or misinterpretation of a phrase as a result of near-homophony, in a way that gives it a new meaning. Mondegreens are most often created by a person listening to a poem or a song; the listener, being unable to clearly hear a lyric, substitutes words that sound ... Read »


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    • Non sequitur (literary device)

    • A non sequitur (English pronunciation: /ˌnɒnˈsɛkwáµ»tər/; Classical Latin: [noːn ˈsɛkᶣɪtʊr] "it does not follow") is a conversational and literary device, often used for comedic purposes. It is something said that, because of its apparent lack of meaning relative to what precede ... Read »


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    • Nonsense word

    • A nonsense word, unlike a sememe, may have no definition. Nonsense words can be classified depending on their orthographic and phonetic similarity with (meaningful) words. If it can be pronounced according to a language's phonotactics, it is a pseudoword. Nonsense words are used in literature for poetic or humorous eff ... Read »


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    • Off-color humor

    • Off-color humor (also known as vulgar humor or crude humor) is humor that deals with topics that may be considered to be in poor taste or overly vulgar. Many comedic genres (including jokes, prose, poems, black comedy, blue comedy, insult comedy, cringe comedy and skits) can incorporate vulgar elements. Most commonly ... Read »


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    • Office humor

    • Office humor, also often called workplace humor, refers to the role of humor as used within the workplace. It is a subject that receives significant attention from students of industrial and organizational psychology and of the sociology of work, as well as in popular culture. Humor is an inevitable part of the so ... Read »


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    • Oxymoron

    • An oxymoron (usual plural oxymorons, less commonly the Greek-style oxymora) is a figure of speech that juxtaposes elements that appear to be contradictory, but which contain a concealed point. Oxymorons appear in a variety of contexts, including inadvertent errors (such as "ground pilot") and literary oxymorons crafted ... Read »


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    • Pecong

    • According to playwright Steve Carter, who wrote an award-winning play of the same name, a pecong is a "verbal battle of insults hurled in rhymed verse." ... Read »


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    • Peri Bathous, Or the Art of Sinking in Poetry

    • "Peri Bathous, Or the Art of Sinking in Poetry" is a short essay by Alexander Pope published in 1727. The aim of the essay is to ridicule contemporary poets. "Peri Bathous" is a blow Pope struck in an ongoing struggle against the "dunces." It is a prose parody of Longinus’ Peri Hupsous (On the Sublime), in th ... Read »


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    • Philogelos

    • Philogelos (Ancient Greek: Φιλόγελως, "Love of Laughter") is the oldest existing collection of jokes. The collection is written in Greek, and the language used indicates that it may have been written in the 4th century AD, according to William Berg, an American classics professor. It is a ... Read »


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    • The Pocket Book of Boners

    • The Pocket Book of Boners

      The Pocket Book of Boners is a book illustrated by Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss), originally published as four separate books in 1931–32 by The Viking Press. In 1941, Readers' League of America compiled these four books and published the Pocket Book of Boners. It was one of the bestselling paperback books of Wo ... Read »


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    • Practical joke

    • A practical joke is a mischievous trick played on someone, generally causing the victim to experience embarrassment, perplexity, confusion or discomfort. A person who performs a practical joke is called a "practical joker". Other terms for practical jokes include prank, gag, jape, or shenanigan. Practical jokes differ ... Read »


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    • Psychoanalytic conceptions of language

    • Psychoanalytic conceptions of language refers to the intersection of psychoanalytic theory with linguistics and psycholinguistics. Language has been an integral component of the psychoanalytic framework since its inception, as evidenced by the fact that Anna O. (pseud. for Bertha Pappenheim), whose treatment via the ca ... Read »


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    • Ribaldry

    • Ribaldry, or blue comedy, is humorous entertainment that ranges from bordering on indelicacy to gross indecency. It is also referred to as "bawdiness", "gaminess" or "bawdry". Sex is presented in ribald material more for the purpose of poking fun at the foibles and weaknesses that manifest themselves in human sexualit ... Read »


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    • Ridiculous

    • The ridiculous is that which is highly incongruous or inferior, sometimes deliberately so to make people laugh or get their attention, and sometimes unintended so as to be considered laughable and earn or provoke ridicule and derision. It comes from the 1540s Latino "ridiculosus" meaning "laughable", from "ridiculus" m ... Read »


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    • Sarcasm

    • Sarcasm is "a sharp, bitter, or cutting expression or remark; a bitter gibe or taunt". Sarcasm may employ ambivalence, although sarcasm is not necessarily ironic. "The distinctive quality of sarcasm is present in the spoken word and manifested chiefly by vocal inflections". The sarcastic content of a statement will be ... Read »


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    • Sardonicism

    • Sardonicism is "the quality or state of being sardonic; an instance of this; a sardonic remark." A sardonic action is one that is "disdainfully or skeptically humorous" or "derisively mocking." Also, when referring to laughter or a smile, it is "bitter, scornful, mocking." Hence, when referring to a person or a persona ... Read »


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    • Satire

    • Satire is a genre of literature, and sometimes graphic and performing arts, in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement. Although satire is usually meant to be humorous, its greate ... Read »


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    • Self-deprecation

    • Self-deprecation is the act of reprimanding oneself by belittling, undervaluing, or disparaging oneself, or being excessively modest. It can be used in humor and tension release. Self-deprecation is often perceived as being a characteristic of certain nations, such as in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New ... Read »


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    • Self-referential humor

    • Self-referential humor or self-reflexive humor is a type of comedic expression that—either directed toward some other subject, or openly directed toward itself—intentionally alludes to the very person who is expressing the humor in a comedic fashion, or to some specific aspect of that same comedic expression. ... Read »


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    • Seriousness

    • Seriousness (noun; adjective: serious) is an attitude of gravity, solemnity, persistence, and toward something considered to be of importance. Some notable philosophers and commentators have criticised excessive seriousness, while others have praised it. Seriousness is often contrasted with comedy, as in the seriocome ... Read »


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    • Shaggy dog story

    • In its original sense, a shaggy dog story or yarn is an extremely long-winded anecdote characterized by extensive narration of typically irrelevant incidents and terminated by an anticlimax or a pointless punchline. Shaggy dog stories play upon the audience's preconceptions of joke-telling. The audience listens to the ... Read »


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    • Slapping the Table in Amazement

    • Slapping the Table in Amazement (Chinese: 初刻拍案驚奇) is a collection of vernacular short stories, written by Ling Mengchu (1580–1644). It was composed in the middle of the 17th century during the end of Ming Dynasty. It involves 78 stories in all and is divided into two parts: the first ... Read »


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    • Sophomoric humor

    • Sophomoric humor refers to juvenile, puerile, and base comedy that would normally be expected from an adolescent. It is used to refer to a type of comedy that often includes bathroom humor and gags that are based on and appeal to a silly sense of immaturity. The word sophomoric, an adjective dating from 1813, is used t ... Read »


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    • Spoiled Rotten America

    • Spoiled Rotten America is a 2006 humor book written by actor, voice artist, comedian, podcaster, and columnist Larry Miller. The book, originally published by ReganBooks, is a collection of seventeen comic essays. ... Read »


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    • Spoonerism

    • A spoonerism is an error in speech or deliberate play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched (see metathesis) between two words in a phrase. These are named after pastor William Archibald Spooner, who was famous for doing this. An example is saying "The Lord is a shoving leopard" ... Read »


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    • Stealth disco

    • Stealth disco (or SD) refers to the act of being videotaped dancing or rocking out behind or near someone who is doing something serious and does not notice. This is sometimes referred to as stealthing (or SD-ing) that person, a process which often concludes with emailing them the footage. The term, if not the activity ... Read »


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    • Surprise factor

    • The surprise factor is a technique used in storytelling to produce a visceral reaction from the audience. It is created by telling a story in a way which creates a certain perception of events which is then revealed to be false often in exact opposition to original perception. The term most often refers to its use in m ... Read »


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    • Surreal humour

    • Surrealist ManifestoSurrealist cinemaSurrealist musicSurrealist techniquesBirmingham Surrealists Surreal humour (also known as absurdist humour) is a form of humour predicated on deliberate violations of causal reasoning, producing events and behaviours that are obviously illogical. Constructions of surreal humour ten ... Read »


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    • Toilet humour

    • Toilet humour, or scatological humour, is a type of off-colour humour dealing with defecation, urination, and flatulence, and to a lesser extent vomiting and other body functions. It sees substantial crossover with sexual humour, such as dick jokes. Toilet humour is popular among a wide range of ages, but is especiall ... Read »


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    • Tongue-in-cheek

    • The tongue-in-cheek figure of speech is used to imply that a statement or other production is humorously or otherwise not seriously intended, and it should not be taken at face value. The phrase was originally meant to express contempt. By 1842, however, the phrase had acquired its contemporary meaning, indicating tha ... Read »


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    • Trash-talk

    • Trash-talk is a form of insult usually found in sports events and insulting people. It is often used to intimidate the opposition, but can also be used in a humorous spirit. Trash-talk is often characterized by use of hyperbole or figurative language, such as, "Your team can't run! You run like honey on ice!" Puns an ... Read »


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    • Tripe Marketing Board

    • The Tripe Marketing Board is a UK based online publication which seeks to promote the consumption of tripe through the use of humour. The LA Times has described the group as an 'internet and publishing phenomenon that may or may not be completely serious.' The group came to prominence in 2012 when it managed to persua ... Read »


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    • Turkey bowling

    • Turkey bowling is a sport which is based on ordinary bowling: a frozen turkey serves as a bowling ball and 10 plastic bottles of soft drinks or water are the bowling pins. The turkey is bowled down a smooth surface, for example, ice or a soap covered sheet of painters plastic (using a bar of soap). It is commonly assoc ... Read »


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    • Turkeys voting for Christmas

    • Turkeys voting for Christmas is an English idiom used as a metaphor or simile (in the construct "like turkeys voting for Christmas") in reference to an apparently suicidal ("death-wish") choice, especially a political vote against one's self-interest. In modern times, in the United Kingdom, turkeys are commonly eaten a ... Read »


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    • The unsuccessful self-treatment of a case of "writer's block"


    • Victorian burlesque

    • Victorian burlesque, sometimes known as travesty or extravaganza, is a genre of theatrical entertainment that was popular in Victorian England and in the New York theatre of the mid 19th century. It is a form of parody in which a well-known opera or piece of classical theatre or ballet is adapted into a broad comic pla ... Read »


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    • Visual gag

    • In comedy, a visual gag or sight gag is anything which conveys its humour visually, often without words being used at all. The gag may involve a physical impossibility or an unexpected occurrence. The humor is caused by alternative interpretations of the goings-on. Visual gags are used in magic, plays, and acting on te ... Read »


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    • Visual pun

    • A visual pun is a pun involving an image or images (in addition to or instead of language), often based on a rebus. Visual puns in which the image is at odds with the inscription are common in cartoons such as Lost Consonants or The Far Side as well as in Dutch gable stones. For instance the "Batenburg" stone from Pri ... Read »


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    • Wellerism

    • Wellerisms, named after sayings of Sam Weller in Charles Dickens's novel The Pickwick Papers, make fun of established clichés and proverbs by showing that they are wrong in certain situations, often when taken literally. In this sense, wellerisms that include proverbs are a type of anti-proverb. Typically a welleris ... Read »


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    • Whitehall farce

    • The Whitehall farces were a series of five long-running comic stage plays at the Whitehall Theatre in London, presented by the actor-manager Brian Rix, in the 1950s and 1960s. They were in the low comedy tradition of British farce, following the Aldwych farces, which played at the Aldwych Theatre between 1924 and 1933. ... Read »


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    • Wit

    • Wit is a form of intelligent humour, the ability to say or write things that are clever and usually funny. A wit is a person skilled at making clever and funny remarks. Forms of wit include the quip and repartee. As in the wit of Dorothy Parker's set, the Algonquin Round Table, witty remarks may be intentionally c ... Read »


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    • Zombie Bike Ride

    • The Zombie Bike Ride is a celebration of the bicycle on last week of October in Key West, Florida. Rock and roll, zombie bikes and costumes of all types and a one mile leisurly ride along the Atlantic Ocean. The first Zombie Bike Ride was created in 2009 by the local WeCycle bike shop, three local businessmen, Marky P ... Read »


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  • What Else?

    • Humour

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