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  • Customary legal systems

    Customary legal systems

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    • Common law

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    • Custom

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    • Germanic law

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Germanic law


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    • Somalian law

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Somalian law


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    • Sri Lankan law

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Sri Lankan law


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    • Custom (law)

    • Custom in law is the established pattern of behavior that can be objectively verified within a particular social setting. A claim can be carried out in defense of "what has always been done and accepted by law." Related is the idea of prescription; a right enjoyed through long custom rather than positive law. Customar ... Read »


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    • Customary law

    • Custom in law is the established pattern of behavior that can be objectively verified within a particular social setting. A claim can be carried out in defense of "what has always been done and accepted by law." Related is the idea of prescription; a right enjoyed through long custom rather than positive law. Customar ... Read »


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    • List of national legal systems

    • The contemporary legal systems of the world are generally based on one of four basic systems: civil law, common law, statutory law, religious law or combinations of these. However, the legal system of each country is shaped by its unique history and so incorporates individual variations. Both Civil (also known as Cont ... Read »


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    • Ācāra


    • Adat

    • Adat (Jawi: عادت) is the generic term derived from Arabic language for describing a variety of local customary practices and tradition as observed by Muslim communitites in North Caucasus, Central Asia and Southeast Asia. Despite its Arabic origin, the term adat resonates deeply throughout the Maritime Sout ... Read »


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    • Ancient Germanic law

    • Several Latin law codes of the Germanic peoples written in the Early Middle Ages (also known as leges barbarorum "laws of the barbarians") survive, dating to between the 5th and 9th centuries. They are influenced by Roman law, canon law, and earlier tribal customs. Germanic law was codified in writing under the influe ... Read »


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    • Anglo-Saxon law

    • Anglo-Saxon law (Old English Ç£, later lagu "law"; dōm "decree, judgement") is a body of written rules and customs that were in place during the Anglo-Saxon period in England, before the Norman conquest. This body of law, along with early Scandinavian law and Germanic law, descended from a family of ancient German ... Read »


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    • Aqsaqal

    • Aqsaqal (also transliterated aksakal, in Turkic languages, literally meaning "white beard") metaphorically refers to the male elders, the old and wise of the community in parts of Central Asia and Caucasus. Traditionally an aqsaqal was the leader of a village or aul until the Soviet times. Acting as advisors or judges, ... Read »


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    • Celtic law

    • A number of law codes have in the past been in use in the various Celtic nations since the Middle Ages. While these vary considerably in details, there are certain points of similarity. The Brehon Laws governed everyday life and politics in Ireland until the Norman invasion of 1171 (the word "Brehon" is an Anglicisati ... Read »


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    • Centre for Tribal and Customary Law


    • Chthonic law

    • Chthonic law is defined as a system of law centered on the sacred character of the cosmos. According to Professor H. Patrick Glenn, the Chthonic legal tradition emerged through experience, orality and memory. According to him it is the oldest of all traditions and can be understood as the law of a culture or tribe. Gle ... Read »


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    • Coutume

    • Coutumes were the customary laws of France. Developed under feudalism during the Middle Ages and in the early modern period, the coutumes were the laws asserted and enforced by the French kings and their vassals, especially in the lands of the Île-de-France, to the exclusion of Roman law. The area where the French ... Read »


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    • Coutumes de Beauvaisis

    • The Coutumes de Beauvaisis is a monument of medieval French law composed by Philippe de Beaumanoir at the end of the 13th century in Old French prose. The text covers a wide range of topics both on procedural and substantive law and is quite voluminous, which explains its attractiveness to scholars. The bibliography of ... Read »


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    • Custom of the sea

    • A custom of the sea is a custom that is said to be practiced by the officers and crew of ships and boats in the open sea, as distinguished from maritime law, which is a distinct and coherent body of law that governs maritime questions and offenses. Among these customs is the practice of shipwrecked survivors drawing l ... Read »


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    • Customary law in Australia

    • Customary law in Australia relates to the systems and practices amongst Aboriginal Australians which have developed over time from accepted moral norms in Aboriginal societies, and which regulate human behaviour, mandate specific sanctions for non-compliance, and connect people with the land and with each other, throug ... Read »


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    • Customary law in South Africa

    • South African customary law refers to a usually uncodified legal system developed and practised by the indigenous communities of South Africa. Customary law has been defined as an established system of immemorial rules [...] evolved from the way of life and natural wants of the people, the general context of which was ... Read »


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    • Cyfraith Hywel

    • Cyfraith Hywel (Welsh: [ˈkəvraiθ ˈhəwɛl]; Laws of Hywel), also known as Welsh law (Latin: Leges Walliæ ), was the system of law practised in medieval Wales before its final conquest by England. Subsequently, the Welsh law's criminal codes were superseded by the Statute of Rhuddlan in AD 1284 and ... Read »


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    • Early Irish law

    • Early Irish law, also called Brehon law, comprised the statutes which governed everyday life in Early Medieval Ireland. They were partially eclipsed by the Norman invasion of 1169, but underwent a resurgence from the 13th until the 17th centuries, over the majority of the island, survived into Early Modern Ireland in p ... Read »


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    • Journal of Legal Pluralism

    • Journal of Legal Pluralism  

      The Journal of Legal Pluralism (formerly African Law Studies) is a triannual peer-reviewed academic journal focusing on all aspects of legal pluralism and unofficial law. It was established in 1969 and is the official publication of the Commission on Legal Pluralism. The journal is published by Taylor & Francis. The ed ... Read »


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    • Kris (Romani court)

    • Kris (Romani: kris) or Kris-Romani is a traditional court for conflict resolution in the culture of Vlax branch of the Romani people. The term derives from the Greek language, "κρίση" (judgment). It is a key institution for enforcing the Romani Code (Romani: romano zakono; zakonuri) within Romanipen. It ... Read »


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    • Leges inter Brettos et Scottos

    • The Leges inter Brettos et Scottos or Laws of the Brets and Scots was a legal codification under David I of Scotland (reigned 1124 – 1153). Only a small fragment of the original document survives, describing the penalties for several offences against people. Historically, the term "Brets" refers to Brythonic peop ... Read »


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    • Lex mercatoria

    • Lex mercatoria (from the Latin for "merchant law"), often referred to as "the Law Merchant" in English, is the body of commercial law used by merchants throughout Europe during the medieval period. It evolved similar to English common law as a system of custom and best practice, which was enforced through a system of m ... Read »


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    • Medieval Scandinavian law

    • Medieval Scandinavian law, a subset of Germanic law, was originally memorized by lawspeakers, but after the end of the Viking Age they were committed to writing, mostly by Christian monks after the Christianization of Scandinavia. Initially they were geographically limited to minor jurisdictions (lögsögur), and t ... Read »


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    • Norman law

    • Norman law refers to the customary law of the Duchy of Normandy which developed between the 10th and 13th centuries and which survives today in the legal systems of Jersey and the other Channel Islands. It grew out of a mingling of Frankish customs and Viking ones after the creation of Normandy as a Norse colony under ... Read »


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    • Pashtunwali

    • Pashtunwali (Pashto: پښتونوالی‎) or Pakhtunwali is a non-written ethical code and traditional lifestyle which the indigenous Pashtun people follow. It is a system of law and governance that began during prehistoric times and is preserved and still in use today, mostly in the rural tribal ... Read »


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    • Smriti

    • Smriti (Sanskrit: स्मृति, IAST: Smṛti), literally "that which is remembered," refers to a body of Hindu texts usually attributed to an author, traditionally written down but constantly revised, in contrast to Śrutis (the Vedic literature) considered authorless, that were transmitte ... Read »


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    • Usages of Barcelona

    • The Usages of Barcelona (Catalan: Usatges de Barcelona, IPA: [uˈzadʒəs ðə βərsəˈɫonə]; Latin: Usatici Barchinonae) were the customs that form the basis for the Catalan Constitutions. They are the fundamental laws and basic rights of Catalonia, dating back to their codification in the ... Read »


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    • Vlach law

    • The Vlach law refers to various special laws and privileges enforced upon pastoralist communities in Europe in the Late Middle Ages and Early modern period. The term "Vlachs" originally denoted Romance-speaking populations, primarily concerned with pastoralism; the term became synonymous with "shepherds". The concept o ... Read »


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    • Xeer

    • Xeer (pronounced /ħeːr/) is the traditional legal system of Somalia, and one of the three systems from which formal Somali law draws its inspiration, the others being civil law and Islamic law. It is believed to pre-date Islam, although it was influenced by Islam and retains many of the faith's conservative eleme ... Read »


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