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    • 1 Bentinck Street

    • 1 Bentinck Street is a grade II listed house in Bentinck Street, in the City of Westminster, London. The house was completed around 1800. It is on the corner with Welbeck Street. Coordinates: 51°31′02″N 0°08′58″W / 51.5173°N 0.1495°W / 51.5173; -0.1495 ... Read »


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    • 4th millennium BC in architecture

    • The following events occurred in architecture in the 4th millennium BC: ... Read »


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    • 8 & 9 Bentinck Street


    • 9 & 11 Duke Street


    • 13th century BC in architecture

    • See also: 14th century BC in architecture, other events of the 13th century BC, 12th century BC in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... Read »


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    • 14th century BC in architecture


    • 18th century BC in architecture

    • See also: 19th century BC in architecture, other events of the 18th century BC, 17th century BC in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... Read »


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    • 19th century BC in architecture

    • See also: 20th century BC in architecture, other events of the 19th century BC, 18th century BC in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... Read »


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    • 21st century BC in architecture

    • See also: 20th century BC in architecture, other events of the 21st century BC, 22nd century BC in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... Read »


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    • 25th century BC in architecture

    • See also: 26th century BC in architecture, other events of the 25th century BC, 24th century BC in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... Read »


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    • 27th century BC in architecture

    • See also: 28th century BC in architecture, other events of the 27th century BC, 26th century BC in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... Read »


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    • 30th century BC in architecture

    • See also: other events of the 29th century BC, 29th century BC in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... Read »


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    • 54 Welbeck Street

    • 54 Welbeck Street is a grade II listed town house in Welbeck Street, in the City of Westminster, London. The house is dated 1896 and in free style pink terracotta "Jacobethan". Coordinates: 51°31′03″N 0°08′58″W / 51.51740°N 0.14942°W / 51.51740; -0.14942 ... Read »


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    • 80 South Street New Design

    • 80 South Street is a new design of the old cancelled building that is proposed to replace the original 80 South Street design. It is first revived in 2013, the architect removed the spire and now more thicker. The building will be completed in 2016. ... Read »


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    • The 88 (San Jose)

    • The 88 (San Jose)

      The 88 is a 22-storey, 87.2 m (286 ft) residential skyscraper in downtown San Jose, California. Upon completion of the tower in 2008, the tower became the tallest building in the city, surpassing the 86.9 m (285 ft) San Jose City Hall that was completed in 2005. ... Read »


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    • 190 New King's Road


    • 1000s in architecture

    • Cathedral of Ani (1001) Brihadishwara Temple, Thanjavur (1002) Torcello Cathedral (1008) Saint-Martin-du-Canigou (1009) ... Read »


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    • 1160s in architecture

    • Thousand Pillar Temple, Warangal (1163) Liuhe Pagoda, Hangzhou (1165) Dhammayangyi Temple, Bagan (1165) Nore stave church (1167) ... Read »


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    • 1270s in architecture

    • San Francesco de' Ferri, Pisa (1270) Palazzo Mozzi, Florence (1273) Coutances Cathedral (1274) Reims Cathedral (1275) White Dagoba of Miaoying Temple (1279) ... Read »


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    • 1797 in architecture

    • Buildings and structures The year 1797 in architecture involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1999 Broadway

    • 1999 Broadway

      1999 Broadway is a 46-story high-rise office building in the city of Denver, Colorado. The building was designed by Curtis W. Fentress, FAIA, RIBA of Fentress Architects and its construction was completed in 1985. It stands at a height of 548 ft (166m), making it the 5th tallest building in Denver. 1999 Broadway has ... Read »


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    • A10 – new European architecture


    • Aberdeen Society of Architects

    • The Aberdeen Society of Architects (ASA) is a chapter of the Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland, and represents some 200 Chartered Architects in Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire and Moray. ASA's main objective is to promote the interests of architects and architecture within its area. ASA was founded in 1898 and its ... Read »


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    • Academia Mexicana de Arquitectura

    • The Academia Mexicana de Arquitectura (AMA, Mexican Academy of Architecture) is a Mexican professional architectural organization, that participates in all national debates of architects. ... Read »


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    • Accent lighting

    • Accent lighting focuses light on a particular area or object. It is often used to highlight art or other artifacts. Common types of accent lights include wall sconces, floodlights, recessed lights, torchère lamps, or track lighting. The brighter light from the accent lamp creates visual interest to a room. Accent li ... Read »


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    • Ad Deir

    • Ad Deir ("The Monastery"; Arabic: الدير ), also known as El Deir, is a monumental building carved out of rock in the ancient Jordanian city of Petra. Built by the Nabataeans in the 1st century and measuring 50 metres (160 ft) wide by approximately 45 metres (148 ft) high, architecturally the Monast ... Read »


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    • AIA Guide to New York City

    • AIA Guide to New York City

      The AIA Guide to New York City by Norval White, Elliot Willensky, and Fran Leadon is an extensive catalogue with descriptions, critique and photographs of significant and noteworthy architecture throughout the five boroughs of New York City. Originally published in 1967, the fifth edition, with new co-author Fran Leado ... Read »


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    • Airey house

    • An Airey house is a type of prefabricated house built in Great Britain following the Second World War. Designed by Sir Edwin Airey to the Ministry of Works Emergency Factory Made housing programme, it features a frame of prefabricated concrete columns reinforced with tubing recycled from the frames of military vehicle ... Read »


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    • Aisleless church

    • An aisleless church (German: Saalkirche) is a single-nave church building that consists of a single hall-like room. While similar to the hall church, the aisleless church lacks aisles or passageways either side of the nave separated from the nave by colonnades or arcades, a row of pillars or columns. However, there is ... Read »


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    • Alberta Association of Architects

    • The Alberta Association of Architects (AAA) is the regulatory body responsible for registering and licensing all Architects and Licensed Interior Designers legally entitled to practice the scope of architecture or licensed interior design, in the Province of Alberta in Canada. ... Read »


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    • Abbey of Sant'Albino, Mortara


    • Albuquerque & Takaoka


    • Alcazaba

    • An alcazaba (Spanish: [alkaˈθaβa], Galician: [alkaˈθaβa]), alcáçova (Portuguese: [ɐɫˈkasuvɐ]) or alcassaba (Catalan: [əɫkəˈsaβə]) is a Moorish fortification in Spain and Portugal. The word derives from the Arabic word القصبة (al-qasbah) ... Read »


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    • Algiers Opera House

    • For the former opera house in Algiers, see Théâtre National Algérien Mahieddine Bachtarzi. Algiers Opera House is an opera house in Ouled Fayet, Algiers, Algeria. It was built in 2016 by the Chinese government. ... Read »


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    • Allgemeine Bauzeitung

    • The Allgemeine Bauzeitung was founded in 1836 by the architect Ludwig Förster and was the most important architectural publication of the Austrian monarchy. It was shut down in 1918. List of magazines in Austria ... Read »


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    • Allison & Allison


    • Alure

    • An alure (O. Fr., from aller, "to walk") or allure is an architectural term for an alley, passage, the water-way or flat gutter behind a parapet, the galleries of a clerestory, or sometimes even the aisle itself of a church. The term is occasionally written valure or valoring. It may also be used to refer to a wall-wal ... Read »


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    • Alvar Aalto Medal

    • The Alvar Aalto Medal was established in 1967 by the Museum of Finnish Architecture, the Finnish Association of Architects (SAFA) and the Finnish Architectural Society. The Medal has been awarded intermittently since 1967 when the medal was created in honour of Alvar Aalto. The award is given in recognition of a signif ... Read »


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    • Amarapura Palace

    • Amarapura Palace was a royal palace in the old capital of Amarapura in Burma. The palace was constructed in the late 18th/early 19th century and later abandoned for Mandalay Palace. Only ruins remain of it today. The British visitor Colesworthy Grant wrote in 1855, that the audience hall, also known as the Nan-dau, wa ... Read »


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    • Ambulatory

    • The ambulatory (Latin: ambulatorium, lit. "walking place") is the covered passage around a cloister or the processional way around the east end of a cathedral or large church and behind the high altar. The term is also used to describe a garden feature in the grounds of a country house. A typical example is the one ... Read »


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    • American Architects Directory

    • The American Architects Directory is a directory of American architects registered with the American Institute of Architects. It was published by R.R. Bowker LLC. The first edition was published in 1956, second edition in 1962, and third edition in 1970. ... Read »


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    • Amphiprostyle

    • In classical architecture, amphiprostyle (from the Greek ἀμφί (amphi), on both sides, and πρόστυλος (prostylos), a portico) denotes a temple with a portico both at the front and the rear. The number of columns never exceeded four in the front and four in the rear. The best-known ... Read »


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    • Anbang

    • Anbang (Korean: 안방, Hanja: 內房), also known as Anchae (Korean: 안채) is a room in a traditional Korean house (hanok) functioning as the space for the head women of a family. It is considered to be the symbol of the head woman's place in the household. Anbang is literally defined as 'the ... Read »


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    • Ancestral home

    • An ancestral home is the place of origin of one's extended family, or the home owned and preserved by the same family for several generations. The place of origin of one's extended family in Chinese culture and society. Ancestral homes in the Philippines kept by generations of the same family. ... Read »


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    • Andaruni

    • Andaruni (Persian: اندرونی‎‎ "inside") is a term used in Iranian architecture. In traditional Persian residential architecture, the andaruni, is in contrast to the biruni, and is a part of the House in which the private quarters are established. This is specifically where the women of th ... Read »


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    • Sant’Antonio Abate, Chieri


    • Apophyge

    • An apophyge (Greek Ancient Greek: αποφυγη, a flying off), in architecture, is the lowest part of the shaft of an Ionic or Corinthian column, or the highest member of its base if the column be considered as a whole. The apophyge is the inverted cavetto or concave sweep, on the upper edge of which ... Read »


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    • Château d'Apremont-sur-Allier


    • Araeostyle

    • Araeostyle (Gr. Ancient Greek: αραιος, "weak" or "widely spaced", and Ancient Greek: στυλος, "column") is an architectural term for the intercolumniation given to those temples where the columns had only timber architraves to carry. ... Read »


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    • Araeosystyle

    • Araeosystyle (Gr. αραιος, "widely spaced", and συστυλος, "with columns set close together"), an architectural term applied to a colonnade, in which the intercolumniation is alternately wide and narrow, as in the case of the western porch of St Paul's Cathedral and the east fron ... Read »


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    • Arama 36/37


    • ARCADE (architecture magazine)

    • ARCADE is a quarterly magazine about architecture and design in the Northwestern United States. The magazine was established in 1981. It is published by the Northwest Architectural League. The mission of ARCADE is to provide dialogue about design and the built environment. The magazine is based in Seattle, Washington. ... Read »


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    • Archi Times

    • Archi Times is the only architectural monthly publication in Pakistan. The magazine was started in 1986. The monthly is published in English and is based in Karachi. Archi Times is widely circulated to architects, planners, engineers, builders and developers, contractors, interior designers, building materials manufac ... Read »


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    • ArchiLab

    • ArchiLab is an annual architectural exposition and conference held in Orléans in France. So far, there have been ArchiLab projects every year from 1999 to 2008. More than 90 architects were invited to present their projects during the Third International Meeting on Architecture held in Orléans in 2001. This meet ... Read »


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    • Archimede construction systems

    • Archimede construction systems are construction techniques achieving rhombic dodecahedral shapes, a space-filling geometry. In America, most of these systems generate building envelopes made up of as little as two panel shapes and sizes, this feature allowing for maximum industrialization. These panels are generally pr ... Read »


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    • ArchINFORM

    • ArchINFORM is an online database for international architecture, originally emerging from records of interesting building projects from architecture students from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany. The self-described "largest online-database about worldwide architects and buildings", it contains plans and images of ... Read »


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    • Archistorm

    • Archistorm is a French architecture, design and contemporary art magazine based in Paris. Founded by Marc Sautereau (Bookstorming) and Christophe Le Gac (Monografik, Stream) in June 2003,Archistorm is a magazine about architecture and contemporary art. The magazine has its headquarters in Paris.Christophe Le Gac was t ... Read »


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    • The Architects Collaborative, 1945–1965


    • Architects' Journal


    • Architectura

    • Architectura: Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Baukunst is a biannual peer-reviewed academic journal of the history of architecture published by Deutscher Kunstverlag. The journal was established in 1971 and is abstracted and indexed in the Arts and Humanities Citation Index,Art Abstracts,Art Index, and Current Conten ... Read »


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    • Architectural Association of Ireland

    • The Architectural Association of Ireland is an organisation dedicated to architecture. It is not a professional accredited organisation but is open to all. In support of the profession, its activities and programs include a public lecture series, annual national architectural awards (since 1985), site visits, exhibitio ... Read »


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    • Architectural design optimization

    • Architectural design optimization (ADO) is a subfield of engineering that uses optimization methods to study, aid, and solve architectural design problems, such as optimal floorplan layout design, optimal circulation paths between rooms, and the like. ... Read »


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    • Architectural designer

    • An architectural designer is a person that is involved in the design of buildings or urban landscapes. Architectural designers have skills similar to architects. However, they may not hold the same degree qualification and are generally not recognised by a statutory body. Depending on the jurisdiction, limitations may ... Read »


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    • Architectural Forum

    • Architectural Forum was an American magazine that covered the homebuilding industry and architecture. Started in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1892 as The Brickbuilder, it absorbed the magazine Architect's world in October 1938, and ceased publication in 1974. ... Read »


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    • Architectural geometry

    • Architectural geometry is an area of research which combines applied geometry and architecture, which looks at the design, analysis and manufacture processes. It lies at the core of architectural design and strongly challenges contemporary practice, the so-called architectural practice of the digital age. Architectura ... Read »


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    • Architectural Heritage

    • Architectural Heritage is an academic journal published by Edinburgh University Press on behalf of the Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland in November each year. It was founded in 1991. The journal focuses on architectural history and conservation articles covering all periods of building up to and including the ... Read »


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    • Architectural History (journal)

    • Discipline History of architecture Language English Edited by Dr Alistair Fair Publication details Publisher
      SAHGB Publications Ltd (UK)
      Publication history
      1958–present Frequency Annually Indexing ISSN 0066-622X
      LCCN 2005-237367 OCLC no.
    • Architectural History  

      Architectural History is the main journal of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain (SAHGB). The journal is published each autumn and usually comprises around 400 pages. The architecture of the British Isles is a major theme of the journal, but articles can consider all places and periods. All articl ... Read »


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    • Architectural illustrator

    • An architectural illustrator is an artist who creates imagery for the design professional that accurately portray the details of an architectural project. These images are used to communicate design ideas to clients, owners, committees, customers, and the general public. Architectural illustrators are hired to put ... Read »


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    • Architectural Institute of British Columbia

    • The Architectural Institute of British Columbia (AIBC) is the regulatory body responsible for registering and licensing all Architects in the Province of British Columbia in Canada. ... Read »


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    • Architectural ironmongery

    • Architectural ironmongery is the manufacture and wholesale distribution of items made from iron, steel, aluminium, brass, or other metals, as well as plastics, for use in all types of buildings. Such items, sometimes also described as architectural hardware, include door handles, locks, closers and hinges ("door furnit ... Read »


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    • Architectural mythology

    • Architectural mythology means the symbolism of real-world architecture, as well as architecture described in mythological stories. In addition to language a myth could be represented by a painting, a sculpture or a building. It is about the overall story of an architectural work, often revealed through art. Not all st ... Read »


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    • Architecture (magazine, 1900–1936)


    • Architecture (magazine)

    • Originally titled Journal of the American Institute of Architects (Vol. #1 - Issue #1) from January 1944 through 1951, the magazine changed its name to The American Institute of Architects Journal. After publication of the AIA Journal ended in August 1976, then followed Architecture magazine. Once the official magazine ... Read »


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    • Architecture and Design Scotland

    • Architecture and Design Scotland, styled Architecture+DesignScotland (A+DS; Scottish Gaelic: Ailtearachd is Dealbhadh na h-Alba), is an executive non-departmental public body of the Scottish Government. It was established in 2005 to provide advice to the government and bodies involved in commissioning, designing and r ... Read »


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    • The Architecture Foundation

    • The Architecture Foundation is Britain's first independent architecture centre. Established in 1991, it aims to examine contemporary issues in architectural theory and practice. The Architecture Foundation has organised public exhibitions, architectural initiatives, competitions and debates. Before moving to its prev ... Read »


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    • Architecture of Brazil

    • The architecture of Brazil is influenced by Europe, especially Portugal. It has a history that goes back 500 years to the time when Pedro Cabral discovered Brazil in 1500. Portuguese colonial architecture was the first wave of architecture to go to Brazil. It is the basis for all Brazilian architecture of later centuri ... Read »


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    • The Architecture of Happiness

    • The Architecture of Happiness

      The Architecture of Happiness is a book by Alain de Botton (ISBN ) which discusses the importance of beauty, published by Pantheon Books in 2006. De Botton, inspired by Stendhal's motto "beauty is the promise of happiness," analyzes human surroundings and how human needs and desires manifest their ideals in architectur ... Read »


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    • Architecture of Lucknow

    • The Lucknow School of Architecture was an experiment by the resurgent Nawabs of Awadh. It was an attempt to preserve the Mughal school of architecture by experimenting with different materials and innovating new concepts. Among the extant architecture there are religious buildings such as Imambaras, mosques and other ... Read »


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    • Architecture of Peru

    • Peruvian architecture is the architecture carried out during any time in what is now Peru, and by Peruvian architects worldwide. Its diversity and long history spans from ancient Peru, the Inca Empire, Colonial Peru to the present day. Peruvian colonial architecture is the conjunction of European styles exposed to the ... Read »


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    • Architecture of San Francisco

    • The architecture of San Francisco is not so much known for defining a particular architectural style, rather, with its interesting and challenging variations in geography and topology and tumultuous history, San Francisco is known worldwide for its particularly eclectic mix of Victorian and modern architecture.Bay wind ... Read »


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    • The Architecture of the City

    • The Architecture of the City (Italian: L'architettura della città) is a seminal book of urban design theory by the Italian architect Aldo Rossi published in Padova in 1966. The book marks the shift from the urban doctrines of modernism to a rediscovery of the traditional European city. In this book, Rossi criticize ... Read »


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    • Architecture Without Architects

    • Architecture Without Architects: A Short Introduction to Non-pedigreed Architecture is a book based on the MoMA exhibition of the same name by Bernard Rudofsky originally published in 1964. It provides a demonstration of the artistic, functional, and cultural richness of vernacular architecture. Rudofsky had long been ... Read »


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    • Architecture's Desire: Reading the Late Avant-Garde


    • ArchitectureWeek

    • ArchitectureWeek is an international weekly magazine covering architecture and design, published online by Artifice, Inc. in Eugene, Oregon, United States. ArchitectureWeek was founded in May 2000, with its first issue publication on May 17, 2000. The magazine is aimed at professional architects and other design profe ... Read »


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    • ARQ (journal)

    • ARQ is a scientific journal published by the School of Architecture of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. It publishes articles on a wide range of architecture-related topics, primarily on issues that are relevant to Chile and South America. Each issue is centered on one theme. ... Read »


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    • Art: A History of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture

    • Art: A History of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture is a two volume collection of general art history written by Frederick Hartt. Volume I goes from the paleolithic cave paintings to late medieval art. Volume II starts at the Renaissance and ends with modern art. It was originally published in 1976 by Harry N. Abra ... Read »


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    • AS 1100

    • AS 1100 is an Australian Standard for technical drawing including both mechanical and architectural designs. AS 1100 standard drawings contain attributes that are universal around Australia. The standard is published by Standards Australia. The standard consists of five parts, You cannot view these without purchasing ... Read »


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    • Atelier 5

    • Atelier 5 is an architectural company founded in Bern, Switzerland by the five architects Erwin Fritz, Samuel Gerber, Rolf Hesterberg, Hans Hostettler and Alfredo Pini. The company built the Halen housing development (Structuralism) between 1955 and 1962 in the Canton of Bern, Switzerland. ... Read »


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    • Atelier Kempe Thill

    • Atelier Kempe Thill is an architectural firm that includes Oliver Thill and André Kempe, originally from East Germany who graduated of Dresden University of Technology. They are now based in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Thill won the Maaskant Prize for Young Architects 2005, and the firm designed the Dutch pavilion for ... Read »


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    • Atholl steel house

    • The Atholl steel house can refer to a steel-framed house or a steel-clad house built in the United Kingdom as a non-traditional house in the Homes fit for heroes period in the 1920s or to replace housing stock after the Second World War in the late 1940s. Atholl Steel Houses was formed by Sir William Beardmore and the ... Read »


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    • Attap dwelling

    • An attap dwelling is traditional housing found in the kampongs of Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. Named after the attap palm, which provides the wattle for the walls, and the leaves with which their roofs are thatched, these dwellings can range from huts to substantial houses. Until the nineteenth century ev ... Read »


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    • Audubon Plantation

    • Audubon Plantation

      The Audubon Plantation is a Southern plantation with a historic mansion located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. The house was completed in 1850. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since May 14, 1987. ... Read »


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    • Australian Antarctic Building System

    • Australian Antarctic Building System or AANBUS is a modular construction system used by the Australian Government Antarctica Division for buildings in Antarctica. The individual modules resemble shipping containers. Each module is approximately 3.6 metres by 6 metres by 4 metres high. Buildings built using the AANBUS ... Read »


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    • Australian Architecture Association

    • The Australian Architecture Association (AAA) was set up in 2004 as a not for profit organisation to promote the understanding of both local and world architecture in Australia. The Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) is used as the model for the development of the organisation. In late 2004, it began to offer talks ... Read »


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    • Autrefois, Maison Privée


    • Avant-garde architecture

    • Avant-garde architecture is architecture which is innovative and radical. There have been a variety of architects and movements whose work has been characterised in this way, especially Modernism. Other examples include Constructivism, Neoplasticism (De Stijl) and Expressionism. ... Read »


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    • Alfredo Azancot

    • Alfredo Azancot (born February 1, 1872) was a Portuguese architect. He was born on São Tomé Island and educated at the École des ponts ParisTech. He emigrated to Chile, and designed many buildings in Viña del Mar, including Brunet Castle, Rioja Palace and the Carrasco Palace. He also designed the Arco Brit ... Read »


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    • Azure (design magazine)

    • Azure is a bimonthly magazine covering architecture and design published in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Azure is described as "an indispensable resource for architects, designers and the design-savvy public" on its website. It was founded in 1985 by Nelda Rodger and Sergio Sgaramella, both born in Milan. In 2000, it won t ... Read »


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    • Bagatelle Plantation

    • Bagatelle Plantation

      The Bagatelle Plantation is a Southern plantation with a historic mansion in Sunshine, Louisiana, USA. The house was designed by architect R. S. Chadsey in the Greek Revival architectural style. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since May 9, 2007. ... Read »


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    • Baileo

    • Baileo is a custom house, in Maluku and North Maluku, Indonesia. The house is a representation of the Baileo Maluku culture and has an important function for the life of the community. Baileo is the identity of any community in the Moluccas in addition to a mosque or church. Baileo serves as a repository for sacred ob ... Read »


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    • Baita (architecture)

    • Baita (pl. baite) is a term used, mainly in Italy, and in France to refer to small dwellings of the central and western Alps. This word is found from the Lepontine to the Maritime alpine sections. These are huts usually constructed with dry-stone walls, although wood may also be used, and are typically roofed with sub ... Read »


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    • Bangladesh Bank Building

    • Bangladesh Bank Building is a skyscraper located in Dhaka, Bangladesh. It is located in Motijheel, the central business district. It rises to a height of 115 metres (377 ft) and has 31 floors. It houses the headquarters of Bangladesh Bank. The building is one of the earliest high-rises in the city. Built in 1985, it ... Read »


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    • Banqueting house

    • The Banqueting House, Whitehall, is the grandest and best known survivor of the architectural genre of banqueting house and the only remaining component of the Palace of Whitehall. The building is important in the history of English architecture as the first structure to be completed in the neo-classical style, which w ... Read »


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    • Barabara

    • A barabara or barabora (Russian); ulax̂, ulaagamax, ulaq, or ulas (plural) (Aleut); and ciqlluaq (Alutiiq ~ Sugpiaq) were the traditional, main or communal dwelling used by the Alutiiq people and Aleuts, the indigenous people of the Aleutian Islands. They lay partially underground like an earth lodge or pit-house, a ... Read »


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    • Barrel roof

    • A barrel roof is a curved roof that, especially from below, is curved like a cut-away barrel. They have some advantages over dome roofs, especially being able to cover rectangular buildings., due to their uniform cross-section. Barrel vaults are a particular form of barrel roof. ... Read »


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    • Bartizan

    • A bartizan, also called a guerite or échauguette, or spelled bartisan, is an overhanging, wall-mounted turret projecting from the walls of late medieval and early-modern fortifications from the early 14th century up to the 18th century. Most frequently found at corners, they protected a warder and enabled him to see ... Read »


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    • BASIX

    • BASIX or Building Sustainability Index is a scheme introduced by the government of New South Wales, Australia in 2004 to regulate the energy efficiency of residential buildings. It offers an online assessment tool for rating the expected performance of any residential development in terms of water efficiency, thermal c ... Read »


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    • Bastide Bel-Air

    • The Bastide Bel-Air is a historic bastide in Aix-en-Provence, France. It is located on the chemin des Platanes in the northern section of Aix-en-Provence, in southeastern France. The bastide was built in the second half of the 18th century. It has been listed as an official historical monument by the French Mini ... Read »


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    • Bastide d'Orcel


    • Bastide de la Guillermy

    • Bastide de la Guillermy

      The Bastide de la Guillermy is a historic bastide in Les Aygalades, a neighbourhood in the 15th arrondissement of Marseille, France. It was built in the 17th century, making it one of the oldest buildings in Marseille. In 1689, the de Guillermy family acquired the land (which formerly belonged to Jean de La Ceppède ... Read »


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    • Bastide de Repentance

    • The Bastide de Repentance is a historic bastide in Aix-en-Provence, France. The bastide was built from 1657 to 1660. It has been listed as an official historical monument by the French Ministry of Culture since 1984. Coordinates: 43°32′21″N 5°28′43″E / 43.5393°N 5.4785°Eï ... Read »


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    • Bastide du Jas de Bouffan

    • Bastide du Jas de Bouffan

      The Bastide du Jas de Bouffan (a.k.a. Granel-Corsy du Jas de Bouffan) is a historic bastide in Aix-en-Provence, France. The bastide is located at 17 route de Galice in Jas de Bouffan, a neighbourhood of Aix-en-Provence. The bastide was built circa 1750 for Gaspard Truphème, an Advisor to the Court of Audits. H ... Read »


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    • Bastide Les Brégues d'Or


    • Baths and wash houses in Britain

    • Baths and wash houses available for public use in Britain were first established in Liverpool. St. George's Pier Head salt-water baths were opened in 1828 by the Corporation of Liverpool, with the first known warm fresh-water public wash house being opened in May 1842 on Frederick Street. Wash houses often combined asp ... Read »


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    • Batter (walls)

    • Batter in construction is a receding slope of a wall, structure, or earthwork. A wall sloping in the opposite direction is said to overhang. The term is used with buildings and non-building structures to identify when a wall is intentionally built with an inward slope. A battered corner is an architectural feature usin ... Read »


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    • Battered corner

    • Battered corners are an architectural detail in some buildings. Old Dutch Church (Kingston, New York) and Upper Sandy Guard Station Cabin are two U.S. National Register-listed places that have them. ... Read »


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    • Battleground Plantation

    • The Battleground Plantation is a Southern plantation with a historic mansion located in Sicily Island, Louisiana, USA. The house was completed in 1850. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since May 14, 1979. ... Read »


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    • BauNetz

    • BauNetz is a German online magazine dedicated to architecture. It claims to have one million visits per month. The magazine was started in 1996. It is headquartered in Berlin-Charlottenburg; managing editor is Jürgen Paul. In 2009, the magazine won the Lead Award as "web magazine of the year." ... Read »


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    • Bawn

    • A bawn is the defensive wall surrounding an Irish tower house. It is the anglicised version of the Irish word bábhún (sometimes spelt badhún), possibly meaning "cattle-stronghold" or "cattle-enclosure". The Irish word for "cow" is bó and its plural is ba. The Irish word for "stronghold, enclosure" is dún ... Read »


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    • BBPR

    • BBPR was an architectural partnership founded in Milan, Italy in 1932. The partners were: From each member's family name, came the acronym "BBPR". The BBPR studio was formed in Milan in 1932 in a climate described by Ciucci as “oscillating between differing and contrasting positions.” Their contribution to ... Read »


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    • Beach fale

    • A beach fale is a simple thatched hut in Samoa. Beach fales are also common in other parts of Polynesia. They have become popular in tourism as a low budget accommodation situated by the coast, built with a few posts, no walls and a thatched roof with a round or oval shape. The word fale (pronounced fah-leh) is the Sa ... Read »


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    • Beach house

    • A beach house is a house on or near a beach, sometimes used as a vacation or second home for people who commute to the house on weekends or during vacation periods. Beach houses are often designed to weather the type of climate they are built in and the building materials and construction methods used in beach housing ... Read »


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    • Bear pit

    • A bear pit was historically used to display bears, typically for entertainment and especially bear-baiting. The pit area was normally surrounded by a high fence, above which the spectators would look down on the bears. The most traditional form of maintaining bears in captivity is keeping them in pits, although many z ... Read »


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    • Bed-mould

    • Bed-mould, in architecture, is a kind of moulding found under the cornice, of which it is a part. Similar to crown moulding, a bed mould is used to cover the joint between the ceiling and wall. Bed moulds can be either sprung or plain, or flush to the wall as an extension of a cornice mould. ... Read »


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    • Bedesten

    • A Bedestan (or bezistan or bedesten) is a covered market usually for haberdashery and craftsmanship. Bezistans were built in Ottoman Empire and their design is based on the design of the mosques. A Bedestan, in the most basic definition, is the central building of the commercial part of the town. It has its origins in ... Read »


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    • Bedstead truss bridge

    • A bedstead truss bridge is a kind of truss bridge whose vertical endposts are crucial, acting in compression. ... Read »


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    • Gerald Beech

    • Gerald Rushworth Beech (1921 – 2013) was an English architect. Beech was born in 1921 in Congleton, Cheshire, and educated at the University of Liverpool School of Architecture starting in 1937, and was a staff member there from 1948 to the 1980s. Beech also ran an architectural practice in Liverpool. In 1975 he ... Read »


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    • Beehive house

    • A beehive house is a building made from a circle of stones topped with a domed roof. The name comes from the similarity in shape to a straw beehive. The ancient Bantu used this type of house, which was made with mud, poles, and cow dung. Early European settlers in the Karoo region of South Africa built similar structu ... Read »


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    • Behavioral urbanism

    • Behavioral urbanism and its related area of study, behavioral architecture, is an interdisciplinary field focused on the interaction between humans and the built environment, studying the effects of social, cognitive, and emotional factors in understanding the spatial behavior of individuals. ... Read »


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    • Belvidere (Natchez, Mississippi)

    • Belvidere (Natchez, Mississippi)

      Belvidere is a Southern plantation with a historic cottage located in Natchez, Mississippi, USA. The cottage was built circa 1837, shortly after Samuel and Robert Patterson acquired the land. In 1847, it was acquired by John Coulson, a merchant. When Coulson purchased the Cliffs Plantation from John W. Henderson in 18 ... Read »


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    • Bench table

    • Bench table (French: banc; Italian: sedile; German: Bank), the stone seat which runs round the walls of large churches, and sometimes round the piers; it very generally is placed in the porches. ... Read »


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    • Bender Hotel (Houston)

    • The Bender Hotel was a ten-story building in Downtown Houston on Main Street at the corner of Walker. It was later known as the San Jacinto Hotel, and later repurposed as an office building before it was demolished. The Bender Hotel, constructed in 1911, was named for its original owner E.L. Bender. It was later renam ... Read »


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    • Bennie-Dillon Building

    • Bennie-Dillon Building

      The Bennie-Dillon Building is a historic high-rise building in Nashville, Tennessee. It is located on the corner of Church Street and 7th Avenue North in Nashville, Tennessee. Its exact address is 700-704 Church Street. The high-rise building was built by the construction firm Foster & Creighton from 1925 to 1926 for ... Read »


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    • Béton brut


    • Beverly Hills Financial Center

    • Beverly Hills Financial Center

      The Beverly Hills Financial Center is a landmark building in Beverly Hills, California. It is located at 9401 on Wilshire Boulevard in the City of Beverly Hills, California. Completed in 1972, it was designed by architect Howard Lane in the modernist architectural style. Its facade is white. It is 42.67 metre high, w ... Read »


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    • Biecz Synagogue

    • Biecz Synagogue

      The Biecz Synagogue is a former synagogue in Biecz, Poland. It is located on the main square of the town. Built in 1903, it is now used as a public library. The synagogue was built in 1903, with two separate entrances: one for men, which leads to the ground floor, and another one for women, which leads to the first fl ... Read »


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    • Bikuben Kollegium

    • Bikuben Kollegium (Danish: Bikuben Kollegiet) is a privately owned dormitory for students in Ørestad, Copenhagen. Opening in August 2006, Bikuben Kollegium is located on the corner of Amager Fælledvej and Njalsgade next to the University of Copenhagen's South Campus. The dorm was designed by the Aart Architects, ... Read »


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    • Binishell

    • Binishells are reinforced concrete thin-shell structures that are lifted and shaped by air pressure. They were invented in the 1960s by Dr. Dante Bini who built 1,600 of them in 23 countries. The original Binishells are circular in plan and are reinforced via a system of springs and rebar. Uses range from schools, hous ... Read »


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    • Bionic architecture

    • Bionic architecture is a movement for the design and construction of expressive buildings whose layout and lines borrow from natural (i.e. biological) forms. The movement began to mature in the early 21st century, and thus in early designs research was stressed over practicality. One of the tasks set themselves by the ... Read »


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    • List of bizarre buildings

    • This is a list of bizarre buildings — buildings which are considered bizarre, odd, strange or weird. These may be follies, novelties or white elephants. Bishop Castle - a family construction project situated in the Wet Mountains of Southern Colorado in the San Isabel National Forest, named after its construct ... Read »


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    • Black granite

    • In the construction industry, black rocks that share the hardness and strength of granitic rocks are known as black granite. In geological terms black granite might be gabbro, diabase, basalt, diorite, norite and anorthosite. ... Read »


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    • Blair toilet

    • The Blair Toilet (a.k.a. Blair Latrine) is a pit toilet designed in the 1970s. It was a result of large-scale projects to improve rural sanitation in Rhodesia under UDI at the Blair Research Institute, and then deployed further during the 1980s after Zimbabwean Independence. There was mass deployment of the toilet desi ... Read »


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    • Blind arcade

    • A blind arcade is an arcade that is composed of a series of arches that has no actual openings and that is applied to the surface of a wall as a decorative element: i.e. the arches are not windows or openings but are part of the masonry face. It is designed as an ornamental architectural element, and has no load-bearin ... Read »


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    • Blowdown stack

    • A blowdown stack is a chimney or vertical stack that is used to vent the pressure of components of a chemical, refinery or other process if there is a process problem or emergency. A blowdown stack can be used to complement a flare stack or as an alternative. The purpose is to prevent 'loss of containment' of volatile ... Read »


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    • Blue Villa

    • Blue Villa

      The Blue Villa (fr: "Villa Bleue") is a historic mansion in Barcelonnette, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France. It was built from 1929 to 1931 for Camille Jean, a French businessman who founded Francia Maritima, a store in Mexico City, Mexico. It was designed in the Art Deco architectural sty ... Read »


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    • Blythewood (Columbia, Tennessee)

    • Blythewood (Columbia, Tennessee)

      Blythewood is a historic house in Columbia, Maury County, Tennessee, USA. The house was built in the Antebellum Era for Thomas Keesee, a carriage maker. Completed c. 1859, the house is in the French Colonial style, unusual for this part of Tennessee. During the American Civil War of 1861-1865, it belonged to the ... Read »


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    • Bomb tower

    • A bomb tower is a lightly constructed tower, often 100 to 700 feet (30 to 210 meters) high, built to hold a nuclear weapon for an above ground nuclear test. The tower holds the bomb for the purpose of the investigation of its destructive effects (such as burst height and distance with given explosive yield) and for the ... Read »


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    • Bondurant's Pharmacy


    • Boot house

    • Boot houses were houses built in the United Kingdom after World War I to accommodate the housing boom following the war. They were named after Henry Boot, whose construction company (Henry Boot Limited), produced an estimated 50,000 houses between the end of World War I and the start of World War II. Due to a shortage ... Read »


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    • Bora Architects

    • Bora Architects is an architectural firm based in Portland, Oregon. Its former name, Boora Architects, was derived from the names of now-retired foundational partners Broome, Oringdulph, O'Toole, Rudolf, and Associates. Its projects include: ... Read »


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    • Borwick Hall

    • Borwick Hall

      Borwick Hall is a 16th-century manor house at Borwick, Lancashire, England. It is a Grade I listed building and is now used as a residential outdoor education and conference centre by Lancashire County Council. The manor of Borwick is mentioned in the Domesday Book as being part of the estates of Roger of Poitou b ... Read »


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    • Bowellism

    • Bowellism is a modern style of architecture heavily associated with Richard Rogers. The premise is that the services for the building, such as ducts, sewage pipes and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior. The style originated with Michael Webb's 1957 student project for a Furniture Manu ... Read »


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    • Branner-Hicks House

    • Branner-Hicks House

      The Branner-Hicks House is a historic house in Jefferson City, Tennessee, USA. The house was completed in the mid-1850s. It was built on land acquired by George Branner in the 1830s for his son, Benjamin Manassah Branner (1805–1879), who went on to serve as Lieutenant-Colonel in the Confederate States Army during ... Read »


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    • Brattishing

    • In architecture, brattishing or brandishing is a decorative cresting which is found at the top of a cornice or screen, panel or parapet. The design often includes leaves or flowers, and the term is particularly associated with Tudor architecture. ... Read »


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    • Brick nog

    • Brick nog, (nogging or nogged, beam filling) is a construction technique in which bricks are used to fill the vacancies in a wooden frame. The walls then may be covered with tile, weatherboards or rendered. Generally the term brick infill is used instead of nogging in half-timbered construction. ... Read »


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    • The Bricker Building

    • The Bricker Building is a historic building in East Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, U.S.. It was built in 1924. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since January 7, 2011. ... Read »


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    • The Bridge: The Building of the Verrazano–Narrows Bridge


    • Brise soleil

    • Brise soleil, sometimes brise-soleil (French pronunciation: ​[bʁiːz sɔlɛj], plural, "brise-soleil" (invariable), or "bris-ole", from French, "sun breaker"), is an architectural feature of a building that reduces heat gain within that building by deflecting sunlight. Brise-soleils can comprise a ... Read »


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    • Broletto

    • In Middle Age Communes in Italy, a broletto was the place where the whole population met for democratic assemblies, and where the elected men lived and administrated justice. Broletto is an ancient Italian word, from medieval Latin "broilum, brogilum", which probably derives from a Celtic word. Its first meaning is "l ... Read »


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    • Building analysis software

    • Building analysis software is software used to measure the performance of buildings. The software allows the screening of existing buildings or concept buildings on several parameters, such as thermal efficiency, energy usage, ... Unlike CAD Editors for Computer Aided Engineering however, the programs are only designed ... Read »


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    • Building Big

    • Building Big is a book written by David Macaulay, author of the book series The Way Things Work. The book details the design of about 25 famous structures, broken down into five categories: Bridges, Tunnels, Dams, Domes, and Skyscrapers. The buildings cover construction from Roman times to the modern era. PBS has crea ... Read »


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    • Building lifecycle management

    • Building lifecycle management or BLM is the adaptation of product lifecycle management (PLM)-like techniques to the design, construction, and management of buildings. Building lifecycle management requires accurate and extensive building information modeling (BIM). Life-cycle management of the built environment requir ... Read »


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    • Building transportation systems

    • Building transportation systems include: ... Read »


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    • List of buildings designed by Talbot Hobbs

    • J Talbot Hobbs was the designer of these buildings in Western Australia between 1880 and 1938. ... Read »


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    • Bullnose

    • Bullnose is a term used in building construction for rounded convex trim, particularly in masonry and ceramic tile. Bullnose trim is used to provide a smooth, rounded edge for countertops, staircasesteps, building corners, verandahs, or other construction. Masonry units such as bricks, concrete masonry units or stru ... Read »


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    • Bunkhouse

    • A bunkhouse is a barracks-like building that historically was used to house working cowboys on ranches in North America. As most cowboys were young single men, the standard bunkhouse was a large open room with narrow beds or cots for each individual and little privacy. The bunkhouse of the late 19th century was usually ... Read »


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    • Burg Marquartstein

    • Burg Marquartstein is an 11th-century castle in Marquartstein, Bavaria, Germany. The 40-bedroom castle was bought by the German art dealer and collector Konrad Bernheimer in 1987, to house his family's collection of art and antiques, as he had just sold the Bernheimer-Haus in Munich. It is listed for sale with Sotheb ... Read »


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    • Burleigh House (London)

    • Burleigh House is a historic building in the City of Westminster, London, United Kingdom. It is located at 355 on The Strand. It was built in the 18th century. It has been Grade II listed since May 1, 1986. Coordinates: 51°30′41″N 0°07′11″W / 51.5113°N 0.1198°W / 51.51 ... Read »


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    • Bush-Herbert Building

    • Bush-Herbert Building

      The Bush-Herbert Building is a historic building in Nashville, Tennessee, USA. It was home to the Bush Brick Company (founded in 1867 by Confederate veteran Major W.G. Bush in 1867) and T. L. Herbert and Sons, from 1911 to 1961. The family business made bricks used for the construction of many buildings on the campus o ... Read »


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    • But and ben

    • But and ben is an architectural style for a simple building, usually applied to a residence. The etymology is from the Scots language for a two-roomed cottage, The term has been used by archaeologists to describe a basic design of "outer room" conjoined with "inner room" as a residential building plan; the outer room, ... Read »


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    • Cactus fence

    • A cactus fence is a hedge or fence made of closely spaced cactus plants, sometimes with barbed wire or wood interwoven with the cacti. Such fences are inexpensive to develop in regions where cacti are common, and can provide an extreme deterrent to any but a determined human intruder. Often their primary function is t ... Read »


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    • Calefactory

    • The calefactory (also warming house) was an important room or building in a medieval monastery in Western Europe. It was here that a communal fire was kept so that the monks could warm themselves after long hours of study in the (unheated) cloister or other work. In the early Middle Ages this was one of the few heated ... Read »


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    • Calendar house

    • A calendar house is a house that symbolically contains architectural elements in quantities that represent the respective numbers of days in a year, weeks in a year, months in a year and days in a week. For example, Avon Tyrrell House in Hampshire was built with 365 windows, 52 rooms, 12 chimneys, 4 wings and 7 externa ... Read »


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    • California Mart

    • The California Mart, also known as California Market Center, are three high-rise buildings in Los Angeles, California, USA. The buildings is located in the Fashion District of Downtown Los Angeles. The main entrance is on Olympic Boulevard, between Main Street and Los Angeles Street. The California Mart was built for ... Read »


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    • Cameron School

    • Cameron School

      The Cameron School is a historic school building in Nashville, Tennessee, USA. Construction began in 1939, and it was completed in 1940. It was built as a project of the Public Works Administration. It was designed by architect Henry C. Hibbs in the Gothic Revival architectural style. It was named in honor of Henry Alv ... Read »


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    • Canal tunnel

    • A canal tunnel is a tunnel for a (shipping) canal. The longest canal tunnel in the world is the Rove Tunnel in France, currently disused. The proposed Stad Ship Tunnel in Norway, while shorter, will be significantly wider and deeper, as it is designed to accommodate seagoing vessels. The oldest canal tunnel in the wor ... Read »


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    • Canal warehouse

    • A canal warehouse is a commercial building principally associated with the expansions of canals from 1761 to 1896. This type of warehouse derived from coastal predecessors, had unique features: it had internal water filled canal arms that entered the building, it was multistorey with canal access at one level and road ... Read »


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    • Cantilever method

    • The Cantilever method is an approximate method for calculating shear forces and moments developed in beams and columns of a frame or structure due to lateral loads. The applied lateral loads typically include wind loads and earthquake loads, which must be taken into consideration while designing buildings. The assumpti ... Read »


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    • Cantoris

    • Cantoris (Latin: "of the cantor"; /kænˈtɔːrɪs/) is the side of a church choir occupied by the Cantor. In English churches this is typically the choir stalls on the north side of the chancel, although there are some notable exceptions, such as Durham Cathedral, Carlisle Cathedral and Southwell Minster. Th ... Read »


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    • Capers-Motte House

    • The Capers-Motte House is a pre-Revolutionary house at 69 Church Street in Charleston, South Carolina. The house was likely built before 1745 by Richard Capers. Later, the house was the home of Colonel Jacob Motte, who served as the treasurer of the colony for 27 years, before passing away in 1770. His son, also named ... Read »


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    • Capital (fortification)

    • In fortification, the capital of a bastion is a line drawn either from the angle of the polygon to the point of the bastion, or from the point of the bastion to the middle of the gorge. The capitals are from 35 to 40 fathoms long, from the point of the bastion to the point where the two demigorges meet.  This artic ... Read »


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    • Cappella dei Tre Re, Ivrea

    • The Chapel of the Three Kings (Italian: Capella dei Tre Re) is a Roman Catholic religious building located on Viale Monte Stella, atop the mountain of the same name, in the town of Ivrea, Province of Turin, region of Piedmont, Italy. The chapel is dedicated to the three magi who attended the Nativity of Jesus. Origina ... Read »


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    • San Carlo Borromeo, Turin

    • San Carlo Borromeo or San Carlo is a Baroque style, Roman Catholic church located in Turin, region of Piedmont, Italy. It mirrors the adjacent church of Santa Cristina and faces the Piazza San Carlo. The arrangement recalls the twin churches (chiese gemelle) of Santa Maria dei Miracoli (1681) and Santa Maria in Montesa ... Read »


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    • Cartwright-Moss House

    • The Cartwright-Moss House is a historic house in Goodlettsville, Tennessee, USA. The house was built as a log house by Jacob Cartwright, a settler, circa 1810s. It was expanded circa 1850. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since August 1, 1979. ... Read »


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    • Casino da Madeira

    • Casino da Madeira

      Casino da Madeira (Casino of Madeira) is a casino located in Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, which is part of the hotel Pestana Casino Park. It was designed by Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer and it opened in 1976. ... Read »


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    • Cassius & Adelia Baker House


    • Castillo de Colomares

    • Castillo de Colomares

      Castillo de Colomares is a monument, in the form of a castle, dedicated to the life and adventures of Christopher Colombus. It was built near Benalmádena in Spain, between 1987 and 1994. Covering an area of 1,500 meters, it is the largest monument in the world to the explorer, but also contains the smallest church i ... Read »


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    • Castle (book)

    • Castle is a Caldecott Honor award-winning book by David Macaulay published in 1977. The book offers a detailed illustrated description of Aberwyvern castle, a fictional castle built between 1283 and 1288. Like many of Macaulay's other works, it consists of a written description of the construction process accompanied b ... Read »


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    • Castle town

    • A castle town is a settlement built adjacent to or surrounding a castle. Castle towns were common in Medieval Europe. Some examples include small towns like Alnwick and Arundel, which are still dominated by their castles. In Western Europe, and England particularly, it is common for cities and towns that were not castl ... Read »


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    • Castner-Knott Building

    • Castner-Knott Building

      The Caster-Knott Building is a historic building in Nashville, Tennessee. It is located on the corner of Church Street and 7th Avenue North in Nashville, Tennessee, at 616-618 Church Street. The Caster-Knott Building was built in 1906 for Charles Castner and William Knott's Castner-Knott Dry Goods Company. Founded in ... Read »


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    • Château d'Heilly


    • Château d'Hénencourt


    • Biblioteca Cathariniana

    • The Biblioteca Cathariniana or Cateriniana is a public library in Pisa, region of Tuscany, Italy. It is affiliated with the Archbishop's Seminary (Seminario Arcivescovile). The library was founded in the 13th-century in the Dominican convent of Santa Caterina d’Alessandria. The convent of Santa Caterina was affil ... Read »


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    • Cathedral Architect

    • A Cathedral Architect or Surveyor of the Fabric for the Cathedral is a person appointed to a Cathedral of the Church of England under section 9(1)(f) of the Cathedrals Measure 1999. The administrative body of the cathedral, the Chapter, is required to consult the Cathedrals Fabric Commission for England before making a ... Read »


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    • Cathedral close

    • A cathedral close is the area immediately around a cathedral, sometimes extending for a hundred metres or more from the main cathedral building. In Europe in the Middle Ages, and often later, it was usually all the property of the cathedral and under the bishop or cathedral's legal jurisdiction rather than that of the ... Read »


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    • Cellular floor raceways

    • Cellular floor raceways are electrical wiring ducts or cells made from steel floor deck that serve as structural formwork for placement of concrete floor slabs and also as wire and cable raceways within the concrete floor slab. These raceway systems are generally used to create floor slabs on multi-story steel-framed ... Read »


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