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    • Abantes

    • The Abantes or Abantians (Greek: Άβαντες) were an ancient Greek tribe and specifically an Ionian one. Their home was Euboea. Aristotle states that the Abantes were Thracians from Abae in Phokis (Phocis). The Abantes were definitely Ionians themselves and many ended up assimilated into the othe ... Read »


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    • Abron (ancient Greece)

    • Abron or Habron (Ancient Greek: Ἅβρων) was the name of a number of people in classical Greek history: 1. A son of the Attic orator Lycurgus. 2. The son of Callias, of the deme of Bate in Attica, who wrote on the festivals and sacrifices of the Greeks. He also wrote a work, περὶ πα ... Read »


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    • Acamantis

    • Acamantis (Greek: Ακαμαντίς) was one of the phylai (tribes) of classical Athens, created during the reforms of Cleisthenes. It was named after the legendary hero Acamas, and included the demes of Cholargos, Eiresidai, Hermos, Iphistiadai, Kerameis, Kephale, Poros, Thorikos, Eitea, Hagnous, Ki ... Read »


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    • Acharnae

    • Acharnae (/əˈkɑːr.niː/; Ancient Greek: Ἀχαρναί) was a deme of ancient Attica. It was part of the phyle Oineis. Acharnae was according to Thucydides, the largest deme in Attica. In the fourth century, 22 of the 500 members of the Athenian council came from Acharnae, more than fro ... Read »


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    • Actium

    • Actium (Greek: Ἄκτιον) was the name of an ancient town on a promontory of western Greece in northwestern Acarnania, at the mouth of the Ambracian Gulf). Actium is chiefly famous as the name given to the nearby naval Battle of Actium, in which Octavian won a decisive victory over Mark Antony on Septe ... Read »


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    • Address to Young Men on Greek Literature

    • Address to Young Men on Greek Literature (alternatively, "Address To Young Men On How They Might Derive Benefit From Greek Literature," Ancient Greek: Πρὸς τοὺς νέους, ὅπως ἂν ἐξ ἑλληνικῶν ὠφελοá ... Read »


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    • Aeacea

    • Aeacea, or Æacea, in antiquity, were solemn feasts and combats celebrated in Aegina in honor of Aeacus, who had been their king, and who, on account of his singular justice upon Earth, was supposed to have a commission given him to be one of the judges in Hell.  This article incorporates text from a publication ... Read »


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    • Aegilips

    • Aegilips (Greek: Αἰγίλιψ) is an Ancient Greek name of an island in the Ionian Sea, near Ithaca. In Homer's Iliad, book II, Aegilips is part of Odysseus's kingdom. Some researchers, including Wilhelm Dörpfeld estimate that Aegilips is present day island of Meganisi. ... Read »


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    • Aeolians

    • The Aeolians (/iːˈoʊliənz/; Greek: Αἰολεῖς) were one of the four major tribes in which Greeks divided themselves in the ancient period (along with the Achaeans, Dorians and Ionians). Their name derives from Aeolus, the mythical ancestor of the Aeolic branch and son of Hellen, t ... Read »


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    • Against Androtion

    • Against Androtion was a speech composed by Demosthenes in which he accused Androtion of making an illegal proposal. This was the first surviving speech of Demosthenes composed on public charges (γραφαί, graphai). The case was brought in 355/4 by Diodoros and Euktemon, and concerned Androtion's propos ... Read »


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    • Against Leptines

    • Against Leptines was a speech give by Demosthenes in which he called for the repeal of a law sponsored by Leptines which denied anyone a special exemption from paying public charges (leitourgiai). It was probably delivered in the year 355/354 BC. Unusually for Athenian law courts, though Demosthenes wrote the speech fo ... Read »


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    • Against Timocrates

    • Against Timocrates was a speech given by Demosthenes in Athens in which he accused Timocrates of proposing an illegal decree. The speech provides our best evidence about the use of imprisonment as a punishment in Classical Athens. Timocrates' law would have allowed debtors to the state to go free on providing a surety ... Read »


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    • Aglaureion

    • The Aglaureion was a shrine to Aglauros on the Acropolis of Athens. Coordinates: 37°58′18″N 23°43′43″E / 37.9717°N 23.7286°E / 37.9717; 23.7286 ... Read »


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    • Agora of the Competaliasts

    • The Agora of the Competaliasts is one of the main markets on the island of Delos, Greece, which dates to the last quarter of the 2nd century BC. This market is directly adjacent to the Sacred Harbour. The bases of a square and a round marble monument, both dedicated to Hermes, can be found in the center of the market s ... Read »


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    • Agoranomus

    • An agoranomus or agoranomos (Greek: ἁγορανόμος), in antiquity, was a magistrate of Athens: there were ten and they maintained order and policy in the markets, settled disputes, examined of the quality of the articles exposed for sale, inspected weights and measures, collected the harbour ... Read »


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    • Akornion

    • Akornion was an important citizen of the Ionian Greek colony of Dionysopolis (today's Balchik, on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria). He is mentioned in the Decree of Dionysopolis, written around 48 BC by the citizens of the polis. The decree mentions that Akornion was sent far away in a diplomatic mission to meet someb ... Read »


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    • Alexandria Arachosia

    • Alexandria in Arachosia was a city in ancient times that is now called Kandahar in Afghanistan. It was one of more than seventy cities founded or renamed by Alexander the Great. Arachosia is the Greek name of an ancient province of the Achaemenid, Seleucid and Parthian empires. The province of Arachosia corresponds to ... Read »


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    • Alexandria Ariana

    • Alexandria Ariana

      Coordinates: 34°14′33″N 62°26′57″E / 34.24246°N 62.44904°E / 34.24246; 62.44904 The first of many Alexandrias in the Far East of the Macedonian Empire, Alexandria in Ariana was a city in what is now Afghanistan, one of the twenty-plus cities founded or renamed by Alexa ... Read »


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    • Athena Alkidemos

    • Athena Alkidemos or Alcidemus (defender of the people, demos) was the epithet of Athena, the city-goddess of Pella, Macedonia. A similar Macedonian epithet of Athena was Alcis. Athena Alkidemos with thunderbolt and shield (aegis) was a usual depiction in Hellenistic tetradrachms. ... Read »


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    • Alokopennesos

    • Alokopennesos (Ancient Greek: ) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, located in the region of the Thracian Chersonesos. Coordinates: 40°17′26″N 26°14′24″E / 40.2905°N 26.2401°E / 40.2905; 26.2401 ... Read »


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    • Alytarches

    • Alytarches (Greek: ἀλυτάρχης ) in ancient Olympic games was the leader of the police force who assisted the Hellanodikai to impose fines on athletes who did not follow the rules. The rabdouchoi, rod-bearers, and mastigophoroi, scourge-bearers, carried out the punishments. If an athlete coul ... Read »


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    • Alyzeia

    • Alyzeia (Greek: Αλύζεια) was an ancient Greek city in Acarnania. In 375 BCE Timotheos son of Konon won a battle near Alyzeia during the Boeotian War. Coordinates: 38°42′33″N 20°57′08″E / 38.7093°N 20.9522°E / 38.7093; 20.9522 ... Read »


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    • Ambrosian Iliad

    • The Ambrosian Iliad or Ilias Picta (Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Cod. F. 205 Inf.) is a 5th-century illuminated manuscript on vellum of the Iliad of Homer. It is thought to have been produced in Constantinople during the late 5th or early 6th century AD, specifically between 493 and 508. This time frame was developed ... Read »


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    • Amphidolis

    • Amphidolis or Amphidolia (Greek: Αμφιδολίς / Αμφιδολία) was an ancient city north of Olympia, Greece and was a market town. It was situated on the mountain road that runs from Elis to Olympia. In earlier times it was a city in the Pisatis district. Amphidolis is men ... Read »


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    • Amphipole

    • Amphipoles, in antiquity, were archons, or chief magistrates, of the city of Syracuse. They were first established by Timoleon, after his expulsion of Dionysius the Elder, tyrant of Syracuse. They governed Syracuse for a space of three hundred years, and Diodorus Siculus assures us they subsisted even in his time (c. 9 ... Read »


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    • Amphiprostyle

    • In classical architecture, amphiprostyle (from the Greek ἀμφί (amphi), on both sides, and πρόστυλος (prostylos), a portico) denotes a temple with a portico both at the front and the rear. The number of columns never exceeded four in the front and four in the rear. The best-known ... Read »


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    • Amphiscian


    • Anacalyteria

    • Anacalyteria, in Ancient Greece, were matrimonial feasts celebrated on the day that the bride was permitted to lay aside her veil, and to be seen in public. They were thus called from the Greek ανακαλύψει ("to discover, uncover").  This article incorporates text from a publication now ... Read »


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    • Anagyrous

    • Anagyrous was one of the deems of ancient Athens, located near modern-day Vari, which belonged to the tribe Erechtheis. According to Pausanias, a sanctuary of the mother of the gods was situated there. The name of the ancient municipality was maintained until 600 AD, as mentioned by geographer and historian Stephanus ... Read »


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    • Anakeion

    • The Anakeion or Anacaeum (from the Greek Ἀνάκειον), also known as the Sanctuary of the Dioskouroi, was a temple in Athens, which was situated neared the Acropolis and dedicated to Castor and Pollux. The name of the temple derives from the Greek Ἄνακες (an archaic form ... Read »


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    • Androlepsy

    • Androlepsy, in ancient Greek law, was a custom in Athens that if a citizen was killed abroad, and the criminal was not delivered for punishment, the victim's relatives were allowed to arrest as many as three citizens of the offending city. They would be held hostage until the actual criminal was handed over, and perhap ... Read »


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    • Andron (architecture)

    • Andron (Greek: ἀνδρών andrōn), or andronitis (ἀνδρωνῖτις andrōnitis), is part of a Greek house that is reserved for men, as distinguished from the gynaeceum (γυναικεῖον gynaikeion), the women's quarters. The andron was used for ... Read »


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    • Angelica (dance)

    • Angelica (Ἀγγελική) was a celebrated dance among the ancient Greeks, performed at their feasts. It was thus called from the Greek ἄγγελος (nuntius, "messenger"), by reason, as Pollux assures us, the dancers were dressed in the habit of messengers. ... Read »


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    • Anthesphoria

    • Anthesphoria, in antiquity, was a flower-festival celebrated in Sicily, and to a lesser extent Peloponnesus, in honor of Proserpine (or Persephone in Greek mythology). The word is derived from the Greek ἅνθος ("flower") and φέρὰ ("I carry"), in regard the goddess was forced away by Pluto ... Read »


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    • Antigonia (Syria)

    • Antigonia (Greek: Αντιγόνεια) also transliterated as Antigonea and Antigoneia was a Hellenistic city in Seleucis, Syria (in modern Turkey), on the Orontes, founded by Antigonus I Monophthalmus in 307 BC, and intended to be the capital of his empire; the site is approximately 7 km northe ... Read »


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    • Antiochia in Mesopotamia

    • Antiochia in Mesopotamia, Antiochia in Arabia, Antiochia Arabis (Greek: Αντιόχεια την Αραβική or Αντιόχεια της Μεσοποταμίας) was an ancient city founded after the death of Alexander the Great ... Read »


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    • Antiochia in Sittacene

    • Antiochia in Sittacene (Greek: Αντιόχεια ή Σιτακηνή) was an ancient city founded in the Hellenistic period, possibly by Antiochus I. Pliny in his Natural History, Book 6, § 206, describes it as an important town in the western part of the ancient region of Sittac ... Read »


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    • Antiochia Lamotis

    • Antiochia Lamotis (Greek: Αντιόχεια η Λαμωτίς) or Antiochia in Isauria (Greek: Αντιόχεια της Ισαυρίας) is a Hellenistic city in Cilicia, Anatolia at the mouth of Lamos (or Lamus) river. The site is on the coas ... Read »


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    • Apamea (Euphrates)

    • Apamea or Apameia (Greek: Απάμεια) was a Hellenistic city on the left (viz.,the east) bank of the Euphrates, opposite the famous city of Zeugma, at the end of a bridge of boats (Greek: zeugma) connecting the two, founded by Seleucus I Nicator (Pliny, v. 21). The city was rebuilt by Seleucus I. The ... Read »


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    • Apodoulou

    • Apodoulou (Greek: Αποδούλου) is the archaeological site of an ancient Minoan mansion or ceremonial building. Apodoulou overlooks the Libyan Sea. Altitude: 450m above sea level Apodoulou was first excavated by Spyridon Marinatos in 1934. The area was inhabited from Late Neolithic times t ... Read »


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    • Apteral

    • Apteral (from the Greek απτερος, "wingless": α-, "without" + πτερον, "wing") is an architectural term applied to amphiprostyle temples which have no columns on the sides. In the temple Athena Nike known as "Nike Apteros", the adjective is used, not as applying to the goddess of ... Read »


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    • Araplos

    • Araplos (Ancient Greek: Άραπλος) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, located in the region of the Thracian Chersonesos. ... Read »


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    • Arba (Achaea)

    • Arba (Ancient Greek: Άρβα) was a settlement in northern Achaea, Ancient Greece. Pausanias mentioned it as one of the villages that the inhabitants of Patrae fled to during the Achaean War. Its location is unknown. ... Read »


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    • Archaeanactids

    • The Archaeanactids (Greek: Αρχαιανακτίδαι) were a Greek dynasty of the Kingdom of Bosporus that ruled in 480–438 BC. The presumed founder, Archaeanax, was probably a strategos of a league of city-states in the Cimmerian Bosporus likely formed as a defense against foreign ... Read »


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    • Archaeological Society of Athens

    • The Archaeological Society of Athens (Greek: Εν Αθήναις Αρχαιολογική Εταιρεία) is an independent learned society.[1] Also termed the Greek Archaeological Society, it was founded in 1837, just a few years after the establishment of th ... Read »


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    • Archelaus (play)

    • Archelaus (Ancient Greek: Ἀρχέλαος, Archelaos) is a drama written and performed in Macedonia by Euripides honouring Archelaus I of Macedon on a par with king Caranus. There is no doubt that Euripides transformed Caranus to Archelaus (meaning "leader of the people") in the play, in an attemp ... Read »


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    • Argyramoiboi

    • Argyramoiboi (Ancient Greek: ἀργυραμοιβοί, "silver changers") were professional money-changers and assayers in ancient Greece (especially in the Athenian Agora) and the Byzantine Empire. ... Read »


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    • Aristomenes

    • Aristomenes (Greek: Ἀριστομένης) was a king of Messenia, celebrated for his struggle with the Spartans in the Second Messenian War (685–668 BC), and his resistance to them on Mount Ira for 11 years. At length the mountain fell to the enemy, while he escaped and was snatched up by ... Read »


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    • Armeni (archaeological site)

    • Armeni is the archaeological site of an ancient Minoan cemetery on Crete. The cemetery is eight kilometers south of the modern town of Rethymnon. Armeni has been under excavation since 1969 by Yiannis Tzedakis. Over 200 chamber tombs and one tholos tomb have been found from the Late Minoan era. The chambers are ... Read »


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    • Arrephorion

    • The Arrephorion was a small building sited beside the north wall of the Acropolis of Athens and next to the wall of Pericles, identified in 1920 by the German architect Wilhelm Dörpfeld. It provided the lodgings for the Arrephoros, four noble Athenian girls who worked to prepare the peplos which would be used in the ... Read »


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    • Artemis Tauropolos

    • ΚΑΙΣΑΡ / ΘΕΟΥ ΥΙΟΣ AMΦΙΠOΛEΙΤΩΝ Artemis Tauropolos, in ancient Greece, was an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as "worshipped at Tauris", "pulled by a yoke of bulls", or "hunting bull goddess". A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" in ... Read »


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    • Artichia

    • Artichia (Greek: Αρτιχία) was an ancient Greek city in the region of Epirus Perhaps located somewhere in ancient Parauaia, now in the Përmet basin. ... Read »


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    • Ascolia

    • Ascolia, in Ancient Greece, was a feast which the peasants of Attica celebrated in honor of Dionysus. They sacrificed a goat to him, and used its skin to make a football, which was filled with wine. The outside of the skin was made slippery with oil, and children tried hopping on it with one foot. The children falling ... Read »


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    • Ascra

    • Ascra (Ancient Greek: Ἄσκρη, Áskrē) was an ancient town in Boeotia which is best known today as the home of the poet Hesiod. It was located upon Mount Helicon, five miles west of Thespiae. According to a lost poetic Atthis by one Hegesinous, a maiden by the name of Ascra lay with Poseidon and ... Read »


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    • Askos (pottery vessel)

    • Askos (Ancient Greek ἀσκός "tube"; plural: ἀσκοί - askoi) is the name given in modern terminology to a type of ancient Greek pottery vessel used to pour small quantities of liquids such as oil. It is recognisable from its flat shape and a spout at one or both ends that could also be us ... Read »


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    • Assesos

    • Assesos or Assesus (Ancient Greek: Ἀσσησός) was a small ancient Greek town in the region of Caria in Asia Minor, near Miletus, and the site of a sanctuary of Athena. It is mentioned by Herodotus in his Histories (I.18–23) in the context of an episode during the war between the Lydians und ... Read »


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    • Atalanta (Bottiaea)

    • Atalanta (Ancient Greek: Ἀταλάντη) or Allante (Ἀλλάντη) or Allantium was an ancient city of Bottiaea, between Gortynia and Europos, near Axius river, which may have been built by the Bottiaeans before their expulsion by Macedonians to Bottike. Axioupoli of today's Kil ... Read »


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    • Pontic Athens

    • The Periplus of the Euxine Sea (Greek: Περίπλους τοῦ Εὐξείνου Πόντου, Latin: Periplus Ponti Euxini) is a periplus or guidebook detailing the destinations visitors encounter when traveling about the shore of the Black Sea. It was written b ... Read »


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    • Athyra (Thrace)

    • Athyras (Ancient Greek: Αθύρας) was an ancient Greek city in Thrace, located in the region of the Propontis. It was also the name of a river. It is thought to be on the site of the modern Turkish city of Büyükçekmece. ... Read »


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    • Atimia

    • Atimia was a form of disenfranchisement used under classical Athenian democracy. Under democracy in ancient Greece, only free adult Greek males were enfranchised as full citizens. Women, foreigners, children and slaves were not full citizens; they could not vote or hold public office, and they had to have adult males ... Read »


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    • Atthidographer

    • In ancient Greece, Atthidographers (Ancient Greek: Ἀτθιδογράφος, atthidographos) were local historians of Attica. They wrote histories of Athens called Atthides (singular: Atthis). Atthidography is the best-attested genre of local history from the ancient Greek world, with fragm ... Read »


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    • Atthis (Philochorus)

    • The Atthis of Philochorus was a local history of Attica and Athens. The full text of the Atthis, which extended to 17 books, has been lost, but the surviving fragments (mostly from the first seven books) give a good idea of its format. Philochorus covered the whole of Athenian history, from the earliest legendary times ... Read »


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    • Atticism

    • Atticism (meaning "favouring Attica", the region that includes Athens in Greece) was a rhetorical movement that began in the first quarter of the 1st century BC; it may also refer to the wordings and phrasings typical of this movement, in contrast with various contemporary forms of Koine Greek (both literary and vulgar ... Read »


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    • Bacchoi

    • In the Eleusinian Mysteries, the bakchoi were the branches that initiates carried during their procession along the Sacred Way, the twenty-one kilometer hike from Athens to Eleusis. ... Read »


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    • Baiake

    • Baiake (Greek: Βαιάκη) was an ancient Greek city of Epirus. It was located between Apollonia and Oricos. ... Read »


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    • Baioulos

    • The term baioulos (Greek: βαΐουλος) was used in the Byzantine Empire to refer to a preceptor or tutor of imperial princes. Only a handful of holders are known, but due to the office's close proximity to the imperial family, and the ties it created with future emperors, a number of baiouloi were ... Read »


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    • Bakis

    • Bakis (also Bacis; Greek: Βάκις) is a general name for the inspired prophets and dispensers of oracles who flourished in Greece from the 8th to the 6th century B.C. Philetas of Ephesus,Aelian and John Tzetzes distinguish between three: a Boeotian, an Arcadian and an Athenian. The first Bakis, a nati ... Read »


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    • Baptisterium

    • In classical antiquity, a baptisterium (Ancient Greek: βαπτιστήριον) was a large basin installed in private or public baths into which bathers could plunge, or even swim about. It is more commonly called natatorium or piscina. ... Read »


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    • Basilinna

    • The Basilinna (Greek: Βασιλίννα) or Basilissa (βασίλισσα), both titles meaning "queen", was a ceremonial position in the religion of ancient Athens, held by the wife of the archon basileus. The role dated to the time when Athens was ruled by kings, and their wives a ... Read »


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    • Batiai

    • Batiai (Greek: Βιτία) was an ancient Greek city of Epirus ... Read »


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    • Battiadae

    • In Greek history, the Battiadae are descendants of Battus, the founder of Cyrene, who became the ruling dynasty of Cyrenaica until 440 BC. The kings of the family were: A famous descendant of Battus and thus one of the Battiadae was Callimachus, the Greek poet and the best known member of the Neoteroi. ... Read »


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    • Berenike (Epirus)

    • Berenike (Greek: Βερενίκη) was an ancient Greek city in the region of Epirus, near current Preveza. It was founded by Pyrrhus II of Epirus (r. 255-238 ВС). ... Read »


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    • Berge (Bisaltia)

    • Berge or Berga (Greek: Βέργη or Βέργα) was a Greek settlement in what is now the Serres regional unit in northern Greece. The town was located in the region of Bisaltia, north-west of Amphipolis, and was founded by Thasians as a dependent colony and emporion sometime in the 5th century BC ... Read »


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    • Bergepolis

    • Bergepolis (Ancient Greek: Βεργέπολις) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, in the region between the river Nestos to the river Hebros. It was founded by colonists from Abdera. Its citizens were called Bergepolites.Bergepolis was an urban center dependent of Abdera. Bergepolis s ... Read »


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    • Richard Billows

    • Richard Billows is a professor of history at Columbia University. His specialty is the Classical Mediterranean, especially the Hellenistic World post-Alexander. He holds an undergraduate degree in History from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. His scholarly works include Antigo ... Read »


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    • Boedromia

    • The Boedromia (Βοηδρόμια) was an ancient Greek festival held at Athens on the 7th of Boedromion (summer) in the honor of Apollo Boedromios (the helper in distress). The festival had a military connotation, and thanks the god for his assistance to the Athenians during wars. It could also comme ... Read »


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    • Bouleutic oath

    • The bouleutic oath was an oath sworn by the new councillors of the Boule. The oath was sworn after the councillors had passed their dokimasia (investigation) by the out-going Boule. According to Aristotle, the oath was introduced to Athens in 501/0 BC, during the archonship of Hermocreon. The contents of the oath can ... Read »


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    • Bouneima

    • Bouneima (Greek: Βουνείμα) was an ancient Greek city in the region of Macedonia (region), Tymphaea, founded by Odysseus ... Read »


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    • Brasiae

    • Brasiae or Brasies or Prasies (Ancient Greek: Βρασιαί; Homeric Greek: Βρυσειαί; Latin: Bryseae; Modern Greek: Βρασιές, Πρασιές) is an Ancient Greek city in South-East Peloponnese. It is located four kilometers SE of Leonidio, next ... Read »


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    • Bromius

    • Bromius in ancient Greece was used as an epithet of Dionysus/Bacchus. It signifies "noisy", "roaring", or "boisterous", from βρέμειν, to roar. According to Richard Buxton, Bromius (Bromios) is another name for a fundamental divine figure that precedes Ouranus and Night in Orphic myth. This alternat ... Read »


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    • Calathus (Greek basket)

    • In Ancient Greece, a calathus was a vase-shaped basket made from reeds. These baskets were made by weaving together reeds or twigs. They were typically used by women to store skeins of wool, but they had other uses in the household. In Roman times, there are reports for baskets of these sorts to be used in agricultura ... Read »


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    • Calpe (Bithynia)

    • Calpe (, Kalpē in Greek) also known "Kerpe" (Kerpe Limanı) is a location in Asia Minor, on the shore of the Black Sea, that was mentioned in Xenophon's Anabasis. A river of Bithynia, the Chalpas of Strabo. It lies between the Psilis, from which it is 210 stadia distant, and the Sangarius. There was also a port c ... Read »


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    • Canae

    • Canae

      Coordinates: 39°2′N 26°48′E / 39.033°N 26.800°E / 39.033; 26.800 Canae /ˈkeɪ.niː/ (Ancient Greek: Κάναι; Turkish: Kane) was, in classical antiquity, a city on the island of Argennusa in the Aegean Sea off the modern Dikili Peninsula on the coast of mod ... Read »


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    • Capture of Oechalia

    • The Capture of Oechalia (traditionally The Sack of Oechalia, Ancient Greek: Οἰχαλίας Ἅλωσις) is a fragmentary Greek epic that was variously attributed in Antiquity to either Homer or Creophylus of Samos; a tradition was reported that Homer gave the tale to Creophylus, in ... Read »


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    • Carissa (Galatia)

    • Carissa was an ancient town of the Trocmi in Galatia, Anatolia, located between Etonea and Amasya. ... Read »


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    • Chaetae (town)

    • Chaetae /ˈkɛti/ was an ancient town of Macedonia that Ptolemy assigns to Mygdonia. Its location cannot precisely be calculated from Ptolemy's account, which places it between Moryllus (nowadays Ano Apostoli, Kilkis regional unit) and Antigonia (Paeonia) which are some ways apart from one another. The town does no ... Read »


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    • Chalkaspides

    • The Chalkaspides (Greek: Χαλκάσπιδες "Bronze Shields") made up one of the two probable corps of the Antigonid-era Macedonian phalanx in the Hellenistic period, with the Leukaspides ("White Shields") forming the other. Chalkaspides were found in other armies, too. The majority of the Se ... Read »


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    • Charadros (Epirus)

    • Charadros (Greek: Χαράδρα) was an ancient Greek pre Hellenistic walled settlement of Epirus. ... Read »


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    • Cheimerion

    • Cheimerion (Greek: Χειμέριον) was an ancient Greek pre Hellenistic fortified settlement and port of Epirus. Its acropolis was fortified since the archaic period. It is located in modern Stikgia, 5 km from Ephyra. It is mentioned by Thucydides (1, Kerkyraica, 30 and 46) and Pausanias. ... Read »


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    • Chersonesos (Thrace)

    • Chersonesos (Ancient Greek: Χερσόνησος) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, located in the region of the Thracian Chersonesos. ... Read »


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    • Choral poetry

    • Choral poetry is a type of lyric poetry that was created by the ancient Greeks and performed by choruses (see Greek chorus). Originally, it was accompanied by a lyre, a string instrument like a small U-shaped harp commonly used during Greek classical antiquity and later periods. During public religious festivals and i ... Read »


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    • Chremonidean War

    • The Chremonidean War (267–261 BC) was fought by a coalition of Greek city-states against Antigonid Macedonian domination. The end result of this conflict was a Macedonian victory which confirmed Antigonid control over the city states of Greece. The origins of the war lie in the continuing desire of many Greek sta ... Read »


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    • Chrysondion

    • Coordinates: 40°52′N 20°11′E / 40.867°N 20.183°E / 40.867; 20.183 Chrysondyon (Greek: Χρυσονδύων; acc. Χρυσονδύωνα) was an ancient Greek city of the Dassaretae to the north of Mount Tomor in Chaonia at the border of ... Read »


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    • Cistophorus

    • The cistophorus was a coin of ancient Pergamum. It was introduced sometime in the years 175-160 BC at that city to provide the Attalid kingdom with a substitute for Seleucid coins and the tetradrachms of Philetairos. It was also used by a number of other cities that were under Attalid control. It continued to be minted ... Read »


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    • Citharede

    • A citharede (Greek: κιθαρῳδός; Latin: citharoedus; British English citharoede) or, in modern usage, citharist, was a classical Greek professional performer (singer) of the cithara (or sometimes lyre), as one who used the cithara to accompany their singing. Famous citharedes included Terpand ... Read »


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    • Cius

    • Cius (/ˈsaɪəs/; Greek: Kίος Kios), later renamed Prusias on the Sea (/ˈpruːʒəs/; Latin: Prusias ad Mare) after king Prusias I of Bithynia, was an ancient Greek city bordering the Propontis (now known as the Sea of Marmara), in Bithynia (in modern northwestern Turkey), and had a long histor ... Read »


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    • Classical Association

    • The Classical Association is a British learned society in the field of classics, and a registered charity. The association was founded on 19 December 1903, and its objects are defined in its constitution as: The Association publishes three journals: Classical Review, Classical Quarterly and Greece & Rome, and a n ... Read »


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    • Cleonymus of Athens

    • Cleonymus was a political ally of Cleon and an Athenian general. In 424 BC, Cleonymus had dropped his shield in battle and fled and was branded a coward. This act is often used to comic effect by Aristophanes. ... Read »


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    • Coma, Egypt

    • Coma (Greek: Κομά, Komá) was a village near Heracleopolis Magna in Lower Egypt in late antiquity. It was famed as the birthplace of St. Anthony, whose hagiography claimed his family was wealthy and owned sizable estates in the area in the early 3rd century AD. ... Read »


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    • Congress at the Isthmus of Corinth

    • The Congress at the Isthmus of Corinth took place in 481 BC, under the presidency of Sparta, and brought together a number of the Greek city states. The Congress agreed to the end of the war between Athens and Aegina. The Congress also discussed the threat from the Persians. Athens was unwilling to place her forces und ... Read »


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    • Cragus (Cilicia)

    • Cragus or Cragos or Kragos (Greek: Κράγος) was an ancient city in Cilicia, Asia Minor at the foot of Mount Cragus; its location is in modern-day Antalya Province, Turkey. Some scholars claim that it is the same city as Antiochia ad Cragum. ... Read »


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    • Cragus (Lycia)

    • Cragus or Cragos or Kragos (Greek: Κράγος) was an ancient city of Lycia, Asia Minor near or on Mount Cragus; its location is in modern-day Turkey (most likely in Muğla Province). Strabo (p. 665), describes Cragus as a city amidst Mount Cragus. There are coins of the town Cragus of the Roman impe ... Read »


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    • Creonion

    • Creonion (Greek: Κρεώνιον) was an ancient Greek city in the region of Epirus in Chaonia. It belonged to the Dexaroi. ... Read »


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    • Crestonia

    • Crestonia (or Crestonice) (Greek: Κρηστωνία / Krestonia) was an ancient region immediately north of Mygdonia. The Echeidorus river, which flowed through Mygdonia into the Thermaic Gulf, had its source in Crestonia. It was partly occupied by a remnant of the Pelasgi, who spoke a different lang ... Read »


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    • Cynosarges

    • Cynosarges (Greek: Κυνόσαργες Kynosarges) was a public gymnasium located just outside the walls of Ancient Athens on the southern bank of the Ilissos river. Its exact location is unknown but it is generally located in what is now the southern suburbs of Athens. Its name was a mystery to t ... Read »


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    • Daduchos

    • Daduchos or Daduchus, or Dadouchos (δᾳδοῦχος "torch-bearer", from δᾶις+ἔχω) is an epithet of Artemis, and notably of Demeter seeking her lost daughter (Persephone) with a torch. It was also the title of the second priest (ranking after the Hierophant) at the Eleusini ... Read »


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    • Damasichthon (King of Thebes)

    • In Greek mythology, Damasichthon, King of Thebes, was son to Opheltes of Thebes, purported to be son to Peneleos (regent of Thebes), the son of Hippalcimus, son of Itonus, son to Boeotus. As Autesion, king of Thebes, left the city in obedience to an oracle, Damasichthon was designated as his successor. Damasichthon was ... Read »


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    • Daminon Teichos

    • Daminon Teichos (Ancient Greek: Δαμινόν τείχος) was an ancient Greek city in Thrace, located in the region of the Propontis ... Read »


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    • Daseae

    • Daseae (Ancient Greek: Δασέαι) was a town in Parrhasia, Arcadia, Ancient Greece. It was situated on the road from Megalopolis to Phigaleia, 29 stades from Megalopolis. It was abandoned when Megalopolis was founded in the 4th century BC. ... Read »


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    • Datos

    • Datos (Ancient Greek: Δάτος) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, located in the region between the river Strymon and the river Nestos.It was founded by colonists from Thasos at 360 BC.Datos was founded with the help and support of the Athenian exiled orator, Callistratus of Aphidnae. Datos wa ... Read »


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    • Decree of Aristoteles

    • The Decree of Aristoteles was a decree passed by the Athenian Assembly in February or March 377 BC. The decree is preserved as the inscription on a stele; this is the most important epigraphical source for the Second Athenian Confederacy. The decree, often known as the "Charter of the Second Athenian Confederacy", form ... Read »


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    • Decree of Philippi

    • A Royal Decree of Alexander the Great, as an arbitration on a land dispute between the city of Philippi and local Thracians (presumably of the Edonian tribes), was discovered in a Byzantine basilica at Filippoi (1936) and published in 1984. The inscription, in two columns, bears the names of Leonnatus and Philotas, (po ... Read »


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    • Delium

    • Delium (also called Delion Greek: Δήλιον Dêlion, Latin: Delium) was a Greek city famous for its important temple dedicated to Apollo, similar to the one in Delos, thence its name. Founded by colonists of Tanagra, it was located approximately 2 km from Oropos and 8 km from Tanagra. There were ... Read »


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    • Delphinia

    • The Delphinia was a festival of Apollo Delphinius held annually on the 6th (or 7th) of the month Munychion (April) in ancient Athens. All that is known of the ceremonies is that a number of girls proceeded to his temple (Delphinium) carrying suppliant's branches and seeking to propitiate Apollo, probably as a god havi ... Read »


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    • Delphinion

    • In ancient Greece, a Delphinion (ancient Greek: Δελφίνιον) was a temple of Apollo Delphinios ("Apollo of the womb") also known as "Delphic Apollo" or "Pythian Apollo", the principal god of Delphi, who was regarded as the protector of ports and ships. The ruin of the Delphinion in Miletus is ... Read »


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    • Demetrius of Amphipolis

    • Demetrius of Amphipolis (Greek: Δημήτριος ὁ Ἀμφιπολίτης; fl. 4th century BC) was one of Plato's students. He is perhaps identical with the person mentioned in Plato's Testament as one of the executors of his last will. ... Read »


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    • Demetrius Triclinius

    • In palaeography, Demetrius Triclinius (Greek: Δημήτριος Τρικλίνιος; b. ca. 1300), a native of Thessalonica, was a Byzantine scholar who edited and analyzed the metrical structure of many texts from ancient Greece, particularly those of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Eu ... Read »


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    • Derris (Thrace)

    • Derris (Ancient Greek: ) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, located in the region of the Thracian Chersonesos. ... Read »


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    • Descent of Perithous

    • The Descent of Perithous (Ancient Greek: Πειρίθου κατάβασις, Peirithou katabasis) is a fragmentary epic poem that was ascribed to Hesiod by the 2nd-century CE geographer Pausanias. The titular topic of the poem would have been the myth of Theseus and Perithous' trip ... Read »


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    • Deuriopus

    • Deuriopus (Strabo: Δευρίοπος Deuriopos; Stephanus of Byzantium: Δουρίοπος Douriopos) was a subdivision of Paionia, in what is today the Republic of Macedonia. Its exact limits are unclear, but it is known that it contained lands around the river Crna (ancient Erigon ... Read »


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    • Diadochoupolis

    • Diadochoupolis (Greek: Διαδοχούπολις, "city of the Diadochi") was a city in ancient Mesopotamia. The only source referring to it is a short mention by Stephanus Byzantius, who records that it was "οὺ πόρρω Κτησιφῶντος" ("no ... Read »


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    • Diaulos (running race)

    • Diaulos (Greek: Δίαυλος, English translation: "double pipe") was a double-stadion race (c. 400 m.) introduced in the 14th Olympiad of the ancient Olympic Games (724 BC). The length of each foot race varied depending on the length of the stadium. This was because the Greek foot varied widely from o ... Read »


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    • Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

    • The Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (1891, revised many times in the 1950s and 60s), covers Ancient Greek and Roman antiquities, mythology and literature in over 2,500 articles. It was written in German by Oskar Seyffert and edited by Henry Nettleship and John Edwin Sandys. ... Read »


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    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities

    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities is an English language encyclopedia first published in 1842. The second, improved and enlarged, edition appeared in 1848, and there were many revised editions up to 1890. The encyclopedia covered law, religion, architecture, warfare, daily life, and similar subjects primarily ... Read »


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    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography

    • The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, first published in 1854, was the last of a series of classical dictionaries edited by the English scholar William Smith (1813–1893), which included as sister works A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. ... Read »


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    • Dikaia (Thrace)

    • Dikaia (Ancient Greek: Δικαία) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, located in the region between the river Nestos to the river Hebros. ... Read »


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    • Distyle

    • A Distyle is a small temple-like structure with two columns. By extension a Distyle can also mean a Distyle in antis, the original design of the Greek temple, where two columns are set between two antae. Hellenistic Money box in the shape of a temple ... Read »


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    • Distyle in antis

    • In classical architecture, Distyle in antis or abusively simply Distyle denotes a temple with the side walls extending to the front of the porch and terminating with two antae, the pediment being supported by two pilasters or sometimes caryatids. This is the earliest type of temple structure in Greece. An example is th ... Read »


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    • Doracium

    • Doracium (Greek: Δωρακίον), was an ancient town of Illyricum, which Hierocles calls the metropolis of the Provincia Praevalitana – a title which rightly belongs to Scodra. Wesseling has supposed that it might represent Dioclea, but this is not confirmed. Its precise location is not known. ... Read »


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    • Doriskos

    • Doriskos (Ancient Greek: Δορίσκος) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, located in the region between the river Nestos to the river Hebros. It was a fortified stronghold located in the homonymous plain and beach extending west of the Hebros delta and east of the peraia of Samothrace, ... Read »


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    • Dryopes

    • Dryopes or Dryopians (/ˈdraɪ.əpiːz, draɪˈɒpiənz/; Ancient Greek: Δρύοπες) were a tribe of ancient Greece. According to Herodotus, they had once lived in a place called Dryopis (Δρυοπίς), later known as Doris. They were driven out by the Malians (and s ... Read »


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    • Drys (Thrace)

    • Drys (Ancient Greek: Δρύς) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, located in the region between the river Nestos to the river Hebros. ... Read »


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    • Dyme, Greece

    • ref.: BMC 29, Sear GCV 2974, Clerk 55, BCD Peloponnesos 482 Dyme was an ancient Greek city in Achaea. It was the westernmost city of the Achaia. The first resident of note was Oebotas who was said to be the first Achaean to win at the Ancient Olympic Games.[1]. He was not honored for this and legendarily cursed others ... Read »


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    • Echea

    • An echea, or sounding vase (literally echoer), is a pot, chamber or vessel that is similar in function to a modern-day bass trap. They were used in ancient Greek theaters to enhance the voices of performers through resonance. They were typically made of bronze, but were also (more economically) of earthenware. Echea w ... Read »


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    • Echephron

    • Echephron (Ἐχέφρων, gen.: Ἐχέφρωνος) is the name of three characters in Greek mythology. ... Read »


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    • Echinos (polis)

    • Echinos (Greek: Εχινός) was an ancient Greek city of Acarnania. ... Read »


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    • Eileithyia Cave

    • Eileithyia Cave

      Eileithyia Cave (also the Cave of Eileithyia) was a Neolithic,Minoan and Mycenaean sacred cave dedicated to the goddess of childbirth, Eileithyia, on the island of Crete. The cave is located one kilometer south of the town of Amnisos. The cave is mentioned in Odysseus's Cretan narrative to Penelope in the Odyssey ... Read »


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    • Ekdromoi

    • The Ekdromos (plural Ekdromoi) was an ancient Greek light hoplite. The name means 'out-runners', and denotes their ability to exit the phalanx and fight in an irregular order, as the situation might demand. The Ekdromoi were mostly lightly armoured (with aspis and bronze helmet) fast infantry and were armed with spear ... Read »


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    • Elaea (Epirus)

    • Elaea or Elaia (Greek: Ελαία), also Elaias Limen is an ancient harbor town at the mouth of the Acheron river of Epirus. The town is mentioned by both Scylax and Ptolemy. Thucydides calls the surrounding district Elaeatis (Greek: Ελαιατις) further evidencing the town. The archaeolo ... Read »


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    • Elateia (Epirus)

    • 'Elateia, also Elatreia or Elatria (Strabo) (Greek: Ελάτεια, Ελάτρεια, Ελάτρια) was an ancient Greek city of Epirus, colony of Elis (in Peloponnese, Greece). Its location is believed to be at the foot of Mount Zalongo, north of the modern village of Pali ... Read »


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    • Elatria

    • Elatria (Greek: Ελάτρεια),was an ancient Greek city in Thesprotia, Epirus founded by Elisians. ... Read »


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    • Elimiotis

    • Elimiotis or Elimeia or Elimaea (Ancient Greek: Ἐλιμιώτις or Ἐλιμία or Ἐλίμεια) was a region of Upper Macedonia that was located along the Haliacmon, north of Perrhaebia/Thessaly, west of Pieria, east of Parauaea, and south of Orestis and Eordae ... Read »


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    • Elymnion

    • Elymnion (Ancient Greek: Ἐλύμνιον, Latin: Elymnium) was an ancient town of Euboea, Greece. It is mentioned in the play Peace by Aristophanes. The exact location is unknown, and several possible locations have been suggested, including the present town Limni on the coast of the North Euboean ... Read »


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    • Enispe

    • Enispe (Ancient Greek: Ὲνίσπη) was a city in ancient Arcadia. It was mentioned by Homer in the Second Rhapsodies of the Iliad as one of the Arcadian cities that participated in the Trojan War, led by general Agapenor. Even in antiquity its location was unknown. The ancient belief that it was situ ... Read »


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    • Enodia

    • Ennodia (also Enodia and Einodia) (Greek: Ἐννοδία, the one in the streets) was an ancient Greek goddess, identified in certain areas or by certain ancient writers with Artemis, Hecate or Persephone. Timarete of Corinth, who died in Pella, Macedonia in the late 5th century BC, is the only atteste ... Read »


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    • Eordaea

    • Eordaea (Greek: Ἐορδαία) was an ancient kingdom and later an administrative region of the kingdom of Macedon. It was part of the ancient geographical region of Upper Macedonia and was located south of Lynkestis, west of Emathia, north of Elimiotis and east of Orestis. The modern province and muni ... Read »


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    • Epicles

    • Epicles (Epiklês) was the name of several prominent Ancient Greeks: ... Read »


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    • Epicurea

    • Epicurea is a collection of texts, fragments and testimonies by Epicurus composed by Hermann Usener in 1887. ... Read »


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    • Epigamia

    • In ancient Athens "epigamia" (Ancient Greek: ἐπιγαμία) designated the legal right to contract a marriage. In particular it regulated the right of intermarrying into another city-state. In the period of Athenian democracy, such intermarriage was not allowed, and only a decree of the popular ... Read »


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    • Epigrams (Homer)

    • Seventeen Epigrams were attributed to Homer in antiquity. They are preserved in a number of texts, including the Life of Homer (Pseudo-Herodotus), the Contest of Homer and Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns. The Epigrams are thought to antedate the Pseudo-Herodotian Life of Homer which was apparently written around the epig ... Read »


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    • Epistates

    • An epistates (Ancient Greek: ἐπιστάτης) in ancient Greece was any sort of superintendent or overseer. In Hellenistic kingdoms generally, an epistates is always connected with a subject district (a regional assembly), where the epistates, a resident representative, exercised control and c ... Read »


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    • Erana (ancient city)

    • Erana (Greek: Εράνα) was a city in ancient Messenia, Greece. It was located near the present town Filiatra, in an area that is now known as Agia Kyriaki. Strabo wrote that Erana was situated on the road from Kyparissia to Pylos, and that it was erroneously identified with the Homeric Arene. More archeol ... Read »


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    • Eukarpia (theonym)

    • In ancient Greek religion and myth, Eukarpia ("well-fruited" or "She of the rich harvest") was a divine personification of fertility, or an epithet or cult title for a deity. It is also found as a personal name for women (as Eukarpides for men). In poetry, the name is an epithet of Aphrodite, Demeter, and Dionysus. In ... Read »


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    • Euripos

    • Euripos (Greek: Εύριπος) was an ancient Greek city in Acarnania. ... Read »


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    • Eurymenai (Epirus)

    • Eurymenai (Greek: Έυρυμεναί) was an ancient Greek city of Epirus of the tribe of the Arktanoi.It belonged to the Molossian koinon. ... Read »


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    • Fragmente der griechischen Historiker

    • Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker, commonly abbreviated FGrHist or FGrH (Fragments of the Greek Historians), is a collection by Felix Jacoby of the works of those ancient Greek historians whose works have been lost, but of which we have citations, extracts or summaries. It is mainly founded on Karl Wilhelm Ludw ... Read »


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    • Free city (classical antiquity)

    • A free city (Latin: civitas libera, urbs liberae condicionis; Greek: ἐλευθέρα καὶ αὐτόνομος πόλις) was a self-governed city during the Hellenistic and Roman Imperial eras. The status was given by the king or emperor, who nevertheless super ... Read »


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    • Galepsus

    • Galepsus or Galepsos (Greek: Γαληψός) was an ancient Greek city located in the region of Edonis in Thrace and later in Macedon. It was located east of Phagres and about 17 km from Amphipolis. It belonged to the Delian League and it was founded as a colony of Thasos. After the conquest of Amphipo ... Read »


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    • Gazoros

    • Gazoros or Gazorus (Greek: Γάζωρος) was a town mentioned by Ptolemy to be in the region of Edonis or Odomantike and also by inscriptions of Hellenistic and Roman times. Later in the 4th century BC, it was annexed to the Macedonian kingdom and made a polis under Phillip II of Macedon or the Antigoni ... Read »


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    • Gertus

    • Gertus or Gertous or Gerous (Greek: Γερτοῦς; acc. Γερτούντα) was an ancient Greek city of the Dexaroi in the region of Epirus. It was located somewhere between lake Lychnidus and Antipatrea. ... Read »


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    • Gonoessa

    • Gonoessa (Greek: Γονόεσσα) was a city in ancient Achaea, Greece. The location of the city has not been found, but it is assumed to lie in the northwesternmost part of present Corinthia. Gonoessa was mentioned by Homer in his Iliad. It was a settlement of the city-state of Pellene with a port fr ... Read »


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    • Graecians

    • The Graecians (Graeki, Graii, Graeci; Greek Γραίοι, Γραίκοι), were an Ancient Greek tribe. Their name is the origin of the Latin (and English) Name of the Greeks as a whole. It is likely that the Graecians were among the first to colonize Italy (i.e. Magna Graecia) in the 8th cen ... Read »


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    • Grastus

    • Grastus is the son of Mygdon. He is considered founder of the Crestonia region and father of Tirse. The town of Tirsae was named after her and other girls, who gave rise to the name of a Macedonian city Parthenopolis (City of Virgins). ... Read »


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    • The Greeks

    • The Greeks

      The Greeks is a 1951 non-fiction book on classical Greece by University of Bristol professor and translator H. D. F. Kitto. The book was first published in hardback by Penguin Books, but has been republished in several formats since its initial publication. The Greeks serves as an introduction to the whole range of lif ... Read »


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    • Hagios Onouphrios

    • Hagios Onouphrios was an ancient Minoan city in southern Crete, on the Plain of Messara, a few miles west of Kannia and Gortyn. ... Read »


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    • Halos

    • Halos (Ancient Greek: Ἅλος) or Halus was a settlement in Ancient Greece, in the region of Phthiotis. ... Read »


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    • Harmost

    • Harmost (Greek: ἁρμοστής, "joiner" or "adaptor") was a Spartan term for a military governor. The Spartan general Lysander instituted several harmosts during the period of Spartan hegemony after the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 BC. They were sent into their subject or conquered towns, pa ... Read »


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    • Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities


    • Hecale (poem)

    • The Hecale (Ancient Greek: Ἑκάλη, Hekalē) is a fragmentary Greek epyllion written by Callimachus during the third century BC. The eponymous heroine of the poem was an impoverished Attic widow with whom Theseus stayed on his way to subdue the Marathonian Bull. On his return from accomplishing this ... Read »


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    • Hekatompedon

    • Hekatompedon (Greek: Εκατόμπεδον) was an ancient Greek city of Epirus. Located either in Lekel or Saraqinisht. ... Read »


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    • Heliastic oath

    • The Heliastic oath (Ancient Greek: ἡλιαστικὸς ὅρκος; heliastikos horkos) was an oath sworn by jurors in the ancient Athenian law courts. In Demosthenes' speech Against Timocrates, the oath was quoted, and using quotations from other speeches, we can reconstruct the ... Read »


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    • Helikranon

    • Helikranon (Greek: Ελίκρανον) was an ancient Greek city in the region of Epirus ... Read »


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    • Hellenion (Naucratis)

    • Hellenion (Greek: Ἑλλήνιον) was an Ancient Greek sanctuary in Naucratis (Egypt), founded by the cities Rhodes, Cnidus, Halicarnassus, Phaselis, Chios, Teos, Phocaea, Clazomenae and Mytilene in the reign of Amasis (6th century BC). ... Read »


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    • Hellenopolis

    • Hellenopolis was a city in Anatolia (perhaps Bithynia or Mysia) founded by an Attalus, by gathering together the inhabitants of a number of Greek cities. ... Read »


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    • Hemithorakion

    • Hemithorakion ( ) was an ancient Greek half-armour that covered the midriff or abdomen area. The inventor is believed to be the Thessalian king Jason of Pherae. It was an equipment of the officers, not of common soldiers. Plutarch records that hemithorakia were worn by Pelopidas and his soldiers during the battle to ex ... Read »


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    • Hephaistia

    • Hephaistia (Greek: Ἡφαιστία) is an archeological site on the northern shore of Lemnos, Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea. It was named in the honor of Hephaistos, Greek god of metallurgy, whose cult was maintained on the island. It was once the capital of the island (8th to 6th centuries ... Read »


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    • Heraclea Sintica

    • ·HPAKΛEΩTΩN· · ΣTPYMONI· Heraclea Sintica was an hellenistic polis built in ancient Greek style by Philip II of Macedon. It was located in Thracian Macedonia, in the district of Sintice, to the east of the Strimon, the site of which is marked by the village of Rupite, in today Bulgaria. The po ... Read »


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    • Heracleia (festival)

    • The Heracleia (Greek: Ἡράκλεια ἐν Κυνοσάργει Herakleia en Kynosargei) were ancient festivals honoring the divine hero Heracles. The ancient Athenians celebrated the festival, which commemorated the death of Heracles, on the second day of the month of Metag ... Read »


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    • Heracles Papyrus

    • The Heracles Papyrus (Sackler Library, University of Oxford, Pap. Oxyrhynchus 2331) is a fragment of a 3rd-century Greek manuscript of a poem about the Labors of Heracles. It contains three unframed colored line drawings of the first of the Labors, the killing of the Nemean Lion, set within the columns of cursive text. ... Read »


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    • Heraion (Thrace)

    • Heraion (Ancient Greek: Ήραιον) was an ancient Greek city in Thrace, located in the region of the Propontis. ... Read »


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    • Herakleia (Acarnania)

    • Herakleia (Greek: Ηράκλεια) was an ancient Macedonian city in Acarnania. It was founded by Phillip of Macedon II, father of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC. ... Read »


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    • Herakleion (Pieria)

    • Herakleion was an ancient city of south coastal Pieria between Phila and Leibethra. During Peloponnesian war it passed into Athenian control in the years 430/29,425/4 and 421 BC. After Athenian alliance with Perdiccas II in ~ 417-413 BC it became again city of Macedon. ... Read »


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    • Hermaea (festival)

    • The Hermaea (Greek: Ἔρμαια) were ancient Greek festivals held annually in honour of Hermes, notably at Pheneos at the foot of Mt Cyllene in Arcadia. Usually the Hermaea honoured Hermes as patron of sport and gymnastics, often in conjunction with Heracles. They included athletic contests of various k ... Read »


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    • Herophon

    • Herophon (Greek: Ἡροφῶν) son of Anaxagoras was a Macedonian sculptor of the 2nd and 1st centuries BC. He is known from an inscription in Olympia, where he created a sculpture of Zeus for Eleans and other Greeks honouring Rome. Herophon was also an envoy of Perseus of Macedon, sent to Eumenes II o ... Read »


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    • Hesperia (journal)

    • Hesperia is a peer-reviewed journal published quarterly by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. It was founded in 1932 for the publication of the work of the school, which was previously published in the American Journal of Archaeology. This is still the main aim of the journal today. It also accepts oth ... Read »


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    • Hieropoios

    • The hieropoios (Greek: ἱεροποιός, translit. hieropoiós, lit. 'supervisor of temples and sacred rites') in ancient Athens was the official in charge of overseeing religious ceremonies and sacrifices. ... Read »


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    • Holkos

    • A Holkoi was an instrument which dragged or hauled ships on land in ancient times. The Greeks and Egyptians were first people to use this instrument. ... Read »


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    • Hydria

    • A hydria (Greek: ὑδρία; plural hydriai) is a type of water-carrying vessel in the pottery of Ancient Greece, and metalwork. The hydria has three handles. Two horizontal handles on either side of the body of the pot were used for lifting and carrying the pot. The third handle, a vertical one, located in ... Read »


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    • Hydriske

    • A hydriske (also called hydriskos, plural hydriskai) is a type of Greek pottery which is a miniature version of the hydria. ... Read »


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    • Hyperetes

    • Hyperetes (Greek: ὑπηρέτης; pl. hyperetai) was an Ancient Greek title. It is derived from ἐρέσσω eresso, and therefore originally signifies a rower, but in later times the word was, with the exception of the soldiers or marines, applied to the whole body of persons who perf ... Read »


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    • Hyporeiai

    • Hyporeiai (Greek: Υπόρεια) was an ancient Greek city in Acarnania. ... Read »


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    • Hyrtakina

    • Hyrtakina (Ancient Greek: Ὑρτακίνα) was an ancient city in south-western Crete, Greece. The city was located between the existing villages Temenia and Papadiana, on Kastri hill, where the ruins of the city are situated. Its history is related to the proximate settlement of Lissos, which is ... Read »


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    • Ibora

    • Ibora was a city in the late Roman province of Helenopontus, which became a Christian bishopric. It is now called Ä°verönü, Erbaa in present-day Tokat Province, Turkey. This is stated also by the Annuario Pontificio, which lists the bishopric as a titular see. The article by Siméon Vailhé in the 1910 Cat ... Read »


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    • Ichneutae

    • Ichneutae

      The Ichneutae (Ancient Greek: Ἰχνευταί, Ichneutai, "trackers"), also known as the Searchers, Trackers or Tracking Satyrs, is a fragmentary satyr play by the fifth-century BC Athenian dramatist Sophocles. Three nondescript quotations in ancient authors were all that was known of the play unt ... Read »


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    • Idaean Dactyls (poem)

    • The Idaean Dactyls (Ancient Greek: Ἰδαῖοι Δάκτυλοι, Idaioi Daktyloi) is a lost poem that was attributed to Hesiod by the tenth-century encyclopedia known as the Suda. The ascription is doubtful, but two quotations of "Hesiod" in other ancient authors do concern the disco ... Read »


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    • Ide (Thracian Chersonese)

    • Ide (Ancient Greek: ) was an ancient Greek city located in Thrace, located in the region of the Thracian Chersonesos. ... Read »


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    • Iklaina

    • Iklaina

      Iklaina (Greek: Ίκλαινα) is a historic village in the municipal unit of Pylos, Messenia, Greece. It is situated in low hills, approximately 10 km to the northeast of the town of Pylos. Important archaeological remains of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1600-1100 BC) period have been brought to light th ... Read »


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    • Ilisos

    • Ilisos

      The Ilisos or Ilisus (Greek: Ιλισός) is a river in Athens, Greece. Originally a tributary of the Kifissos River, it is now largely channeled underground. Its name is in all probability Pre-Greek: it features the -sós/-ssós/-ttós ending, which it shares with many other toponyms in Attica ... Read »


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