Don't miss the piglix.com special BONUS offer during our Beta-test period. The next 100 new Registered Users (from a unique IP address), to post at least five (5) piglix, will receive 1,000 extra sign-up points (eventually exchangeable for crypto-currency)!

* * * * *    Free piglix.com Launch Promotions    * * * * *

  • Free Ads! if you are a small business with annual revenues of less than $1M - piglix.com will place your ads free of charge for up to one year! ... read more

  • $2,000 in free prizes! piglix.com is giving away ten (10) Meccano Erector sets, retail at $200 each, that build a motorized Ferris Wheel (or one of 22 other models) ... see details

Mace of the United States House of Representatives


The Mace of the United States House of Representatives is one of the oldest symbols of the United States government.

In one of its first resolutions, the U.S. House of Representatives of the 1st Federal Congress (April 14, 1789) established the Office of the Sergeant at Arms. The first Speaker of the House, Frederick Muhlenberg of Pennsylvania, approved the ceremonial mace as the proper symbol of the Sergeant at Arms in carrying out the duties of this office.

The current mace has been in use since December 1, 1842. It was created by New York silversmith William Adams, at a cost of $400, to replace the first one that was destroyed when the Capitol Building was burned on August 24, 1814, during the War of 1812. A simple wooden mace was used in the interim.

The design of the mace is derived from an ancient battle weapon and the Roman fasces. The ceremonial mace is 46 inches high and consists of 13 ebony rods – representing the original 13 states of the Union – bound together by silver strands criss-crossed over the length of the pole. Atop this shaft is a silver globe on which sits an intricately cast solid silver eagle.

For daily sessions of the House, the Sergeant carries the silver and ebony mace of the House in front of the speaker, in procession to the rostrum. When the House is in session, the mace stands on a cylindrical pedestal of green marble to the Speaker's right. When the House is in committee, it is moved to a pedestal next to the Sergeant at Arms' desk. Thus, members entering the chamber know immediately whether the House is in session or in committee. When the body resolves itself into Committee of the whole House on the State of the Union, the Sergeant moves the mace to a lowered position, more or less out of sight.



...
Wikipedia

1,000 EXTRA POINTS!

Don't forget! that as one of our early users, you are eligible to receive the 1,000 point bonus as soon as you have created five (5) acceptable piglix.

...