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    Monaco villas


    • The historical villas of Monaco represent a significant example of residential architecture. Originally seen as symbols of Belle Epoque luxury, they were once emblematic of the principality itself. However, by the 1950s they were viewed by Monaco's Consultative Committee on Public Works as a social anachronism. While recent years have seen a renewed appreciation within the principality for villa architecture, the number of historic villas remaining reduces each year.

      The urban history of Monaco and its villas has, until recently, been subject to poor documentation and archiving. As of 2016, Monaco still had no official preservation laws governing historic buildings.

      In 1960 Prince Rainier III established the Monaco Economic Development Corporation to attract new business to the Principality. It was successful in this, but the influx of new investors and workers resulted in a wave of demolitions of Belle Epoque villas to enable the construction of apartments and new hotels.

      Following major development in the 1970s, Prince Rainier III banned high rise development in the Principality. However his successor, Prince Albert II, overturned the Sovereign Order. This, a further influx of new residents, accelerated the destruction of the architectural heritage of single family villas for new luxury apartments. Demands for affordable public housing led to further villa demolitions. In 2013 an official publication documenting the urban history of the principality called it a place where "architecture is temporary".

      In a nation where public dissent is rare, there was significant criticism of the destruction. The 2013 demolition of the Art Deco Hiver d'Sporting ("Winter Sporting") Club building, and the rotunda of the Hôtel de Paris and its 1900 extensions, caused further dismay, and the establishment of protest group "Monaco Patrimoine", whose leader was quoted as saying: "Monaco is destroying, without scruples, villas from the Belle Epoque…Monaco is losing its identity", and it was termed "a genocide of memories".

      In 2015 a major row broke out between the Government and the elected National Council over the demolition of the picturesque Belle Epoque-style 1931 apartment building Le Palais de la Plage (37 Avenue Princesse Grace - originally Boulevard des Bas-Moulins), which originally sat on the beachfront, and was replaced by an apartment building of the same name. The President of the Cultural and Heritage Mission of the National Council, Daniel Boeri, termed the demolition "brutal", and that Monegasque citizens were being treated by the Government as "children incapable of reason". While a heritage law and Heritage Institute was still in planning, he said: "That we are still at this point in 2015 is breathtaking... The example of the Palais de la Plage is a perfect illustration of its absolute necessity."



      • 2009 – three villas for construction of the Tour Odéon apartment tower.
      • 2013 – six villas in rue des Giroflées: numbers 1a, 7,8,10 "Villa Lisette",12 "Villa Le Clos Fleuri" and 14; demolished for the Tour Giroflées apartment tower, at 1 Rue des Giroflées.
      • 2014 – six villas in a triangular site bordered by Rue des Agaves and Rue Augustin Vento for the ''Stella'' apartments and offices, 6 Rue Augustin Vento. The villas were "Andrée Renée", "Alberte," "Félicité" "Andrée Jeanne," "Marie Angèle" and "Guidetta".
      • 2014 – two villas, "Les Cigognes" and "Villa Linotte", and an annex to the latter called "Pavilion". Demolished for Les Cigognes apartments, 17 Rue Louis Auréglia.
      • 2016 - two villas: Villa Ida, 6 boulevard Rainier III, and Villa des Platanes, 2 rue Plati, plus two Belle Epoque apartment buildings "Cedars" and "Larches" at 4 and 6 rue Plati for the Villa Ida apartment project.[1]
      • 29 Villa Marcelle – Balconied Belle Epoque. Demolished 2015. Replaced by state-owned apartments.
      • 2 Villa Minerva – Rented by painter Francis Bacon.
      • 15 Villa de la Costa –
      • 19 Villa Bijou – Summer home of Baroness Orczy. Demolished 1990s. Replaced by office block of the same name.
      • 31 Le Saint Michel*
      • 4 & 6 – Four storey highly decorated Beaux-Arts villas.
      • 29 Villa Mimosa – Replaced by apartments of the same name.
      • 17 Villa Sauber – Grand Belle Epoque. One of the showpieces of Monaco. Currently houses one section of the New National Museum of Monaco.
      • 35 Villa Suka Hati – Demolished 1976. Large almost-fortress structure with terrace, originally on the beach. Limewashed red, hence it's nickname 'Villa Rouge'. Rented by painter Francis Bacon 1947-9.
      • Villas du Sporting – Monte-Carlo Sporting peninsula. Three modern curvilinear villas, Numbers 1,2 and 3; 2014, architects Christian Curau and Laurent Gire; landscaper Jean Mus.
      • 4 Le Metropole*
      • 3 Villa Monjoie – 1900-10. Four storey balconied Belle Epoque style with roof terrace. Renovated 2003.
      • 15 Villa Les Aigles – ("The Eagles") – Exceptionally large towered Belle Epoque villa. The garden, which was originally at street level, has been raised to a terrace to enable the insertion of offices along the frontage.
      • 1 et 3* Façades only
      • 3 Villa Les Lierres*
      • 8 Presbytère*
      • 8A Eglise Saint Charles*
      • 1 Maison*
      • 2 Maison Bregnat*
      • 3 Villa de L'Insernia*
      • 5 Maison*
      • 7 Villa Barbarin* – 1900; architect Théodore Gastaud
      • 2 Villa Miraflores* – 1908. Replaced Villa Souvenance, 1891, architect André Oscar.
      • 3 Villa Gardenia* – 1909, architect Francois Médecin.
      • 5 Villa Claude* – 1912, architect Fulbert Aureglia.
      • 6 Villa Celine* – Four storey balconied Belle Epoque.
      • 5 Villa Del Sol – Art Moderne style, set within a very large stone-walled garden: an almost unique survival in the Principality on both counts. Demolished 2015. Replaced by state-owned apartments.
      • 2 Villa Belgica – Three storey Beaux Arts style villa with egg-shaped dome. Dome removed and replaced with two ill-matching additional storeys.
      • 22 Villa Boutons d'Or – ("Gold Buttons") 1921, architect Charles Bernasconi. Deep eaved Mediterranean style.
      • 26 Villa Bon Accord – Highly picturesque three storey neo-classical villa with arcaded bow front.
      • 33 Villa Marie*
      • 35 Villa Belgica*
      • Villa El Mandar* and 37b*
      • 8 Villa Favorite*
      • 10 Villa Helios*
      • 12 Villa Albina*
      • 14 Villa Beausoleil*
      • 16 Maison Florent Andrei*
      • 18 Castel Florence*
      • ? Villa Loretta
      •  ? Villa Marjolaine – Boulevard d'Italie.(?)
      • 3 Villa Italia* Highly formal Neo-Classical/Mediterranean villa with deep eaves and extended window casements.
      • 7-9 Villa Les Abeilles – ("The Bees") Monaco home of Sir Rupert Clarke, 2nd baronet. Demolished. Replaced by office and apartment tower of the same name.
      • 11 Villa Paulette – Once home to Sir John Woodroffe.
      • 15 Villa Juliette – Five storey balconied neo-classical. (Fifth storey a possible later addition.)
      • 17 Villa La Rousse – Four storey balconied neo-classical.
      • 18 Villa Beaulieu* – Bijou Neo-Classical two-storey villa with roof terrace.
      • 19 Villa Ribéri – Striking Belle Epoque building of deep eaves and dramatic extended and peaked upper window canopies. No garden.
      • 21 Villa Elise*
      • 35 Villa Le Rêve* – ("The Dream") Large Neo-Classical villa set within a large garden.
      • 37 Villa Marie* – Restrained three-storey Neo-Classical style. Refurbished 2012.
      • 38 Villa Guitou*
      • 44? Villa Primerose –
      • ? Villa Thérèse – Refurbished 2016. Office of Foi Action Rayonnement (FAR).
      • 37 Palais du Midi – Highly picturesque five storey balconied Belle Epoque apartment building with rondel corners.
      • 56 Villa Paloma – Formerly "Villa Coquette. Built for Edward N. Dickerson. 1913, architect unknown, garden designed by Octave Godard. Houses one section of the New National Museum of Monaco.
      • 57 Villa Ispahan* Originally "Villa Danichgah" ("The Poet's House"); renamed 1986. Highly exotic looking villa in Moorish style; 1910. One of the showpieces of Monaco. For the Persian Prince Arfa Mirza Riza Khan, advisor to Prince Albert I.
      • 59 Villa Alexandre*
      • 61 Maison Vieille*
      • 75 Villa Marie-Antoinette – Belle Epoque style with large striking curved pediment.
      • 1 Immeuble banque BNP*
      • 2a Villa Bromar – Belle Epoque style with large decorative ceramic facade elements.
      • 12 Villa La Lestra – Large three storey classical style with mansard roof within a large terraced garden. From 1951 home of novelist, playwright, and filmmaker Marcel Pagnol. Demolished 2008 for an apartment building of the same name.
      • 14 Villa Ménésini* –14 Boulevard des Moulins. Belle Epoque apartment building.
      • 16 Hotel du Louvre*
      • 17 Villa Helene*
      • 18 Villa Les Acacias*
      • 19 Villa Marcel*
      • 20 Casa Emma* * – Belle Epoque apartments.
      • 21 Villa Saint Laurent*
      • 22 San Carlo*
      • 24 Villa Le Lotus*
      • 26 Palais Albany*
      • 27 Le Radium*
      • 37 – Three storey neo-classical with later three storey addition.
      • 39bis Palais Miramare* – Three storey balconied neo-classical.
      • 41 Casa Bella – Grand Belle Epoque apartment building.
      • 1 Villa Trentenario – Large four storey Neo-classical villa with deep arcaded balconies set within large front garden. Demolished 2007. Replaced in 2009 by Villa Les Gaumates apartments.
      • 5 Villa Du Royan – Home of Marie Marguerite Beaudenom de Lamaze. (d.1947) Belle Epoque with stone retaining wall fronting the Boulevard with large stone gate piers. Demolished (including wall) 2011. Replaced by apartments.
      • 6 Villa Byron – Four storey neoclassical, one side with large oval bow front. Originally a hotel.
      • 7 Villa Jacqueline –
      • 9 Villa Myrelingues* – Belle Epoque.
      • 19 Lamartine*
      • 23 Villa Alice*
      • 25 Villa Paola*
      • 26 Villa Saïd*
      • 27 Villa des Fleurs*
      • 29 Villa La Belle Vie* – Originally called Villa Louis. 1893 Neo-Classical/Belle Epoque apartment building. Renovated and renamed 2012.
      • 1 Villa Irma Chemin de la Rousse*
      • 1 Villa Josephine*
      • 2 Maison Riberi Chemin du Ténao*
      • 5 Villa Ida – 5 Boulevard Rainier III. Large, Neo-Classical style. Demolished 2016 for Villa Ida apartments project, together with Villa de Platanes and the apartment buildings "Cedars" and "Larches" at 2, 4 and 6 rue Plati.
      • 10 Villa Emmanuel – Picturesque four storey plus tower neo-classical villa on raised terrace.
      • 11 Villa Trotty* – Large Neo-Classical villa.
      • 12 Villa Hebe – Neo-classical villa.
      • 14 Les Cigognes – ("The Storks") 14 Boulevard Rainier III. Demolished 2014, together with Villa Linotte, for an apartment and office development Les Cigognes.
      • 24 Le Nid – ("The Nest") Striking Belle Epoque villa; 1904. Deep eaves decorative with shell motifs.
      • 27 Villa Tara – Bijou picturesque balconied neo-classical two-storey villa set in a garden with a separate raised terrace area.
      • 2 Villa? –
      • 3 Villa? – Three storey neo-classical cliff-edge villa Grecian elements and facade mosaics. Garden terrace on second storey.
      • 6 Villa? –
      • 14 Villa Le Sphinx – Three-storey Neo-Classical style with tower.
      • 15 Villa Sevigne – Undistinguished neo-classical apartments. Possible replacement for earlier villa.
      • 16 Villa Girasole – Large two-storey Neo-Classical style set within a garden.
      • 17 Villa Rose de France – Monaco residence of banker Maurice Ephrussi and his wife Charlotte-Béatrice née de Rothschild. Demolished. Replaced by apartment block.
      • 24 Villa Colibri – ("Villa Hummingbird") –
      • 27 Villa Roqueville – Large Neo-Classical villa set in garden, with later extension over part of the original garden. Currently headquarters of the Monaco branch of the Red Cross.
      • 29 Villa des Garets – Picturesque balconied Belle Epoque style apartment building.
      • 5 Villa Nocturne – Renovated 2012.
      • 11 Villa Les Grillons*
      • North façade only*
      • Palais de L'Aurore – Spectacular Beaux-Arts apartment building.
      • 24-6 Villa Frontalière – ("Villa Border") Belle Epoque villa with later villas built in former large gardens (four structures in all). Rented by painter Francis Bacon, but its sea views are now blocked by an apartment tower.
      • 8 Villa Marie Angèle – Demolished 2014 together with five other villas for Stella apartment and office project.
      • 2 – Two storey neoclassical.
      • 4 Villa Victoria – Three-storey restrained neo-classical. Refurbished 2000. (There are also "Villa Victoria" apartments at 8 Boulevard Rainier III (originally: Boulevard de l'Ouest), constructed 2013, which possibly replaced an earlier "Villa Victoria" on the site.)
      • 5 Villa ? – Magnificent Belle Epoque villa with columned entrance, with large front terrace (original heavily planted terrace garden now removed), with impressive stone staircased entrance.
      • 11Villa Palazzino – Three storey neo-classical with half bow front, on a large raised front terrace.
      • 15 - Villa Dryade. Demolished. Once home to writer Kay Boyle. Replaced by apartments of the same name.
      • 16 Villa Diana
      • Villa Jacqueline
      • Villa Rignon – Large three storey neo-classical residence with porte en coche entrance, and immense stone retaining wall with rear entrance on Boulevard Princesse Charlotte. Demolished 2011 (including stone wall) for apartments of the same name. Apartments now bear address 29 Boulevard Princesse Charlotte.
      • 7 Villa Marie Georgette* – Grand villa set on large terrace with immense stone wall.
      • 12 Villa Petrouchka*
      • 13 Villa ? – Grand neo-classical villa set on large terrace with high stone wall.
      • 16 Villa?
      • 18 Villa Roma – Three storey (two from street) neo-classical with pedimented entrance.
      • 22 Villa Hollandia – Four storey (three from street) neo-classical.
      • 2* Façades only
      • 3* Façades only
      • 4* Façades only
      • 5* Façades only
      • 6* Façades only
      • 7* Façades only
      • 8* Façades only
      • 10* Façades only
      • 12* Façades only
      •  ? Villa Andrée Jeanne – Demolished 2014 together with five other villas for Stella apartment and office project.
      • 12 Villa Andrée Renée – Four storey balconied Neo-Classical, raised on a terraced podium. Demolished 2014 together with five other villas for Stella apartment and office project.
      • 14 Villa Alberte – Highly picturesque three-storey balconied Belle Epoque villa with central projecting front and decorative pediment. Demolished 2014 together with five other villas for Stella apartment and office project.
      • 16 Villa Félicité – Four storey neo-classical apartment building. Demolished 2014 together with five other villas for Stella apartment and office project.
      • 1 Villa Sainte-Cécile – Demolished 1958. Replaced by Millefiori apartment tower.
      • 2 Villa Les Flots – ("The Waves") 1894, Belle Epoque style; facade features pilasters, medallions, key pendant arches, pediments curved stucco cornices, balconies and a loggia with oriel shell.
      • 3 Villa La Mascotte*
      • 4 Villa La Vague*
      • 6 Villa La Brise*
      • 10 Villa Lisette – Deep-eaved Mediterranean style. Demolished 2015, together with five other villas, for the Tour Giroflées apartment tower.
      • 12 Villa Le Clos Fleuri – Two storey, deep-eaved Mediterranean style. Demolished 2015 together with five other villas for the Tour Giroflées apartment tower.
      • 18*
      • 20*
      • 21*
      • 22*
      • 23*
      • 25*
      • 27*
      • 30*
      • 19 Villa Péronne – 1877, architects Notari and Adjani; modified 1907, architect César Lancette.
      • 21 Villa Rosine
      • 25 Rue Grimaldi – Neo-classical four storey balconied apartment building. Demolished 2008. Replaced by Le Monator apartments, 2010.
      • 27 Rue Grimaldi – Neo-classical three storey balconied apartment building. Demolished 2008. Replaced by Le Monator apartments, 2010.
      • 32* Façades des constructions
      • 33 Villa Leopold – Restrained three-storey neo-classical with shallow pediments and detailing.
      • 45 Villa Trianon
      • 3 Palais ZigZag*
      • 4 Villa Beau* Site
      • 8 – Picturesque single storey neo-classical villa with pilasters.
      • 15 Villa Marie Laurence
      • 17 Villa Linotte ("Villa Swallow") – Included an annex called "Pavillion". Tall balconied Belle Epoque style with a large front garden with columned arbour. Demolished 2014, together with villa Les Cigognes, for an apartment and office development Les Cigognes.
      • 15* Façades only
      • 16 Villa des Pins*
      • 24* Façades only
      • 26 Villa Georgette* – 1899; architect: Théodore Gastaud.
      • 29* Façades only
      • 31 Villa Delphine*
      • 1 Villa Leonie* – Highly picturesque towered Belle Epoque apartment building.
      • 4 Sun Palace*
      • 21 Villa Bleue*
      • 2 Villa des Platanes – ("The Plane Trees") Large two storey, deep-eaved, Mediterranean style with garden. Demolished 2016, together with the Villa Ida, and the plain-front Belle Epoque apartment buildings "Cedars" and "Larches" (with large courtyard garden) at 4 & 6 Rue Plati for the apartment towers of the Villa Ida project.
      • 18 Villa Belvedère*
      • 30 Le Petit Grain* – 1907, architect Fulbert Auréglia.
      • 34 Villa La Vigie*
      • 39 Villa Bellevue*
      • 41 Maidon Bambusi*
      • 41bis El Palacio*
      • 47 Garden Palace*
      • 49 Villa Du Parc* – 1923, architect Phillippe Gamba.
      • 2 Maison Fontaine*
      • 22 Pavillon*
      • 7 Villa Carmen*
      • 13 Palais Florestine* – Grand five-storey Belle Epoque.
      • 15 Villa ? – Belle Epoque
      • 17 Villa? – Neoclassical
      • 19 Villa de l'Avenir – Four storey neo-classical.
      • 3 Villa Ex Boisset* and 3b*
      • 8 Maison Luca*
      • 2* Façades only
      • 4* Façades only
      • 6* Façades only
      • Les Cigales – Four-storey Mediterranean-style with tower.
      • Villa Datura –
      • Villa Guidetta – Demolished 2014 together with five other villas for Stella apartment and office project.
      • Villa Le Lys – ("The Lily") home of Lillie Langtry, Lady de Bathe.
      • Villa Ravel –
      • Villa du Rocher de Cancale –
      • Villa Saint Martin – villa with a large garden.
      • Saphir Cottage - Large plain-front balconied villa with roof garden.
      • Villa Saint-Albert – Large oval four storey pillared neo-classical mansion.
      • Villa Violette – Two storey neo-classical villa set within a very large terraced garden.
      • Le Chateau MaletCap D'Ail. Immense Beaux Arts mansion set within 14 acres of gardens. Architect: Hans-Georg Tersling; 1892. For Sir Edward Malet. Later extended. Gardens redesigned by Russell Page.
      • Villa la Vigie – ("The Lookout") Pointe de la Veille, France. Belle Epoque villa set within gardens approached via its own private road. Situated just beyond the Monaco border, but owned by the Société Des Bains De Mer. Restored by, and a holiday home of Karl Lagerfeld for a decade in the 1990s. Other notable rentees include, in 1909, Daisy, Princess of Pless.
      • Giordano, Nathalie Rosticher (Ed.)Monacopolis: Architecture, Urban Planning and Urbanisation in Monaco: Projects and Constructions, 1858-2012, NMNM, Monaco 2013.
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