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  • Harold Lloyd

    Harold Lloyd

    • Harold Lloyd
      Harold Lloyd - A Pictorial History of the Silent Screen.jpg
      Lloyd in 1924
      Birth name Harold Clayton Lloyd
      Born (1893-04-20)April 20, 1893
      Burchard, Nebraska, U.S.
      Died March 8, 1971(1971-03-08) (aged 77)
      Beverly Hills, California, U.S.
      Medium Motion pictures (silent and sound)
      Nationality American
      Years active 1913–1963
      Genres Slapstick
      Influences Charlie Chaplin
      Influenced Buster Keaton
      Spouse Mildred Davis (1923–69)
      Children Gloria Lloyd (1923–2012)
      Marjorie Elizabeth Lloyd (1924–1986)
      Harold Lloyd Jr. (1931–71)

      Harold Clayton Lloyd, Sr. (April 20, 1893 – March 8, 1971) was an American actor, comedian, film director, film producer, screenwriter, and stunt performer who is most famous for his silent comedy films.

      Harold Lloyd ranks alongside Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton as one of the most popular and influential film comedians of the silent film era. Lloyd made nearly 200 comedy films, both silent and "talkies", between 1914 and 1947. He is best known for his bespectacled "Glasses" character, a resourceful, success-seeking go-getter who was perfectly in tune with 1920s-era United States.

      His films frequently contained "thrill sequences" of extended chase scenes and daredevil physical feats, for which he is best remembered today. Lloyd hanging from the hands of a clock high above the street in Safety Last! (1923) is one of the most enduring images in all of cinema. Lloyd did many of these dangerous stunts himself, despite having injured himself in August 1919 while doing publicity pictures for the Roach studio. An accident with a bomb mistaken as a prop resulted in the loss of the thumb and index finger of his right hand (the injury was disguised on future films with the use of a special prosthetic glove, though the glove often did not go unnoticed).

      Although Lloyd's individual films were not as commercially successful as Chaplin's on average, he was far more prolific (releasing twelve feature films in the 1920s while Chaplin released just four), and made more money overall ($15.7 million to Chaplin's $10.5 million).

      Lloyd was born in Burchard, Nebraska, on April 20, 1893, to James Darsie Lloyd and Sarah Elisabeth Fraser; his paternal great-grandparents were from Wales.

      In 1910, after his father succumbed to several failed business ventures, Lloyd's parents divorced and his father moved with his son to San Diego. Lloyd had acted in theater since a child, but in California he began acting in one-reel film comedies around 1912. Lloyd worked with Thomas Edison's motion picture company, and his first role was a small part as a Yaqui Indian in the production of The Old Monk's Tale. At the age of 20, Harold moved to Los Angeles, and took up roles in several Keystone comedies. He was also hired by Universal as an extra and soon became friends with aspiring filmmaker, Hal Roach. Lloyd began collaborating with Roach who had formed his own studio in 1913. Roach and Lloyd created "Lonesome Luke", similar to and playing off the success of Charlie Chaplin films.



      • Agee, James (2000) [1958]. "Comedy's Greatest Era" from Life magazine (9/5/1949), reprinted in Agee on Film. McDowell, Obolensky, Modern Library. 
      • Bengtson, John. (2011). Silent Visions: Discovering Early Hollywood and New York Through the Films of Harold Lloyd. Santa Monica Press. ISBN . 
      • Brownlow, Kevin (1976) [1968]. "Harold Lloyd" from The Parade's Gone By. Alfred A. Knopf, University of California Press. 
      • Byron, Stuart; Weis, Elizabeth (1977). The National Society of Film Critics on Movie Comedy. Grossman/Viking. 
      • Cahn, William (1964). Harold Lloyd's World of Comedy. Duell, Sloane & Pearce. 
      • D'Agostino, Annette M. (1994). Harold Lloyd: A Bio-Bibliography. Greenwood Press. ISBN . 
      • Dale, Alan (2002). Comedy is a Man in Trouble: Slapstick In American Movies. University of Minnesota Press. 
      • Dardis, Tom (1983). Harold Lloyd: The Man on the Clock. Viking. ISBN . 
      • Durgnat, Raymond (1970). "Self-Help with a Smile" from The Crazy Mirror: Hollywood Comedy and the American Image. Dell. 
      • Everson, William K. (1978). American Silent Film. Oxford University Press. 
      • Gilliatt, Penelope (1973). "Physicists" from Unholy Fools: Wits, Comics, Disturbers of the Peace. Viking. 
      • Hayes, Suzanne Lloyd (ed.), (1992). 3-D Hollywood with Photography by Harold Lloyd. Simon & Schuster. 
      • Kerr, Walter (1990) [1975]. The Silent Clowns. Alfred A. Knopf, Da Capo Press. 
      • Lacourbe, Roland (1970). Harold Lloyd. Paris: Editions Seghers. 
      • Lahue, Kalton C. (1966). World of Laughter: The Motion Picture Comedy Short, 1910–1930. University of Oklahoma Press. 
      • Lloyd, Annette D'Agostino (2003). The Harold Lloyd Encyclopedia. McFarland & Company. ISBN . 
      • Lloyd, Annette D'Agostino (2009). Harold Lloyd: Magic in a Pair of Horn-Rimmed Glasses. BearManor Media. ISBN . 
      • Lloyd, Harold; Stout, W. W. (1971) [1928]. An American Comedy. Dover. 
      • Lloyd, Suzanne (2004). Harold Lloyd's Hollywood Nudes in 3-D. Black Dog & Leventhal. ISBN . 
      • Maltin, Leonard (1978). The Great Movie Comedians. Crown Publishers. 
      • Mast, Gerald (1979) [1973]. The Comic Mind: Comedy and the Movies. University of Chicago Press. 
      • McCaffrey, Donald W. (1968). 4 Great Comedians: Chaplin, Lloyd, Keaton, Langdon. A.S. Barnes. 
      • McCaffrey, Donald W. (1976). Three Classic Silent Screen Comedies Starring Harold Lloyd. Associated University Presses. ISBN . 
      • Mitchell, Glenn (2003). A–Z of Silent Film Comedy. B.T. Batsford Ltd. 
      • Reilly, Adam (1977). Harold Lloyd: The King of Daredevil Comedy. Macmillan. ISBN . 
      • Robinson, David (1969). The Great Funnies: A History of Film Comedy. E.P. Dutton. 
      • Schickel, Richard (1974). Harold Lloyd: The Shape of Laughter. New York Graphic Society. ISBN . 
      • Vance, Jeffrey; Lloyd, Suzanne (2002). Harold Lloyd: Master Comedian. Harry N Abrams. ISBN . 
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