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  • Fast Fit

    Fast Fit


    • In the fashion industry, fast fit (often capitalised and written as Fast Fit) refers to a method of handling the shipping and sampling processes typical of multinational organisations who primarily manufacture offshore. The Fast Fit philosophy centres on the sharing of 360-degree, annotatable images intended to reduce the costs and lead times associated with shipping physical samples across continents. The term is particularly prevalent amongst (but not exclusive to) companies that fit the Fast Fashion model, as Fast Fit is considered to be a vital component in the reduction of time between design inspiration and finished garment or product.

      The goal of Fast Fashion (a philosophy that drives high street retailers and brands like Zara, H&M, Topshop, Benetton, American Apparel and Peacocks) is to create demand for – and deliver to market – garments “closer to trend” and at a lower price point than was possible using traditional design, sampling, manufacturing and logistics methods. This is typically achieved through a combination of technology, supply chain agility, and inventory monitoring and replenishment.

      The Fast Fashion model, with its emphasis on the rapid release of mini-collections, can only operate when superlative efficiency is achieved at each stage of the product development process. According to recent research, garment quality and cost are still the primary factors in the consumer’s buying decisions and while catwalk-inspired designs may seem to appear quickly on store shelves under the Fast Fashion model, each garment or accessory is required to undergo the same iterative sampling, fitting, quality assurance and pricing processes as it would under any other model.

      Traditionally, those processes are handled by the physical shipping of sample garments from one continent to another. The Fast Fit philosophy is intended to replace at least a portion of this costly and time-consuming process with detailed, 360-degree images of those samples, recognising the fact that images are the most universal and efficient form of communication.

      With the rise of offshore manufacture and distributed working, the cost and time implications of traditional fitting and sampling processes have become increasingly ill-suited to the industrial and commercial requirements of the Fast Fashion model.

      Fast Fit is designed to be the most efficient method of fitting, sampling and international collaboration – delivering for each process lead time and cost savings comparable those seen for design, manufacture and logistics under the Fast Fashion model. By reducing the need for international sample shipping – replacing it with a centralised, platform-agnostic database of 360-degree, annotatable images, Fast Fit aims to reduce the traditional 4-9 month product cycle seen under traditional methods to 4–8 weeks.



      • Inspiration is gleaned from catwalk shows, design-led publications, competitors and other industry sources;
      • Design and garment-technical work is undertaken in-house or by designated freelance contractors;
      • The resulting industrialised design is then put out to tender (using what is called a tech pack), with several supply chain partners being given the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to produce the garment to the desired standard and at an acceptable cost;
      • The selected manufacturer then begins the iterative process of constructing samples, shipping those samples to the brand’s designed office until one is approved for final production;
      • Finally, logistics partners deliver the garment to stores or to intermediary warehouses, where quality assurance typically takes place.
      • Inspiration is gleaned from catwalk shows, design-led publications, competitors and other industry sources;
      • Inspiration is shared between global departments, in a collaborative, cloud-based environment, leading to products that incorporate a considerable amount of collaborative work before they enter production;
      • Design and garment-technical work is undertaken in-house or by designated freelance contractors, based on input from teams all over the globe;
      • The resulting industrialised design is then put out to tender (using what is called a tech pack), with several supply chain partners being given the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to produce the garment to the desired standard and at an acceptable cost. Those suppliers can use a consistent “studio” environment to share any initial samples or material information they require;
      • The selected manufacturer then begins the iterative process of constructing samples in line with the clear feedback and parameters set out by the design and garment technical teams. Comprehensive, 360-degree images of each sample and details of each creative milestone are collected in a centralised location (generally web-based cloud storage) accessible to all, and distributed teams are able to comment on and track each revision until a final production sample is approved;
      • Finally, logistics partners deliver the garment to stores or to intermediary warehouses, where quality assurance typically takes place.
      • Ralph Lauren
      • Macy’s
      • Li & Fung
      • Gloria Jeans Corporation
      • Patagonia
      • PVH (Phillip Van Heusen)
      • Maidenform
      • Victoria’s Secret
      • Crystal Martin UK
      • Asmara bd pvt ltd.
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