• Culture industry

    Culture industry

    • The term culture industry (German: Kulturindustrie) was coined by the critical theorists Theodor Adorno (1903–1969) and Max Horkheimer (1895–1973), and was presented as critical vocabulary in the chapter "The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception", of the book Dialectic of Enlightenment (1944), wherein they proposed that popular culture is akin to a factory producing standardized cultural goods—films, radio programmes, magazines, etc.—that are used to manipulate mass society into passivity. Consumption of the easy pleasures of popular culture, made available by the mass communications media, renders people docile and content, no matter how difficult their economic circumstances. The inherent danger of the culture industry is the cultivation of false psychological needs that can only be met and satisfied by the products of capitalism; thus Adorno and Horkheimer especially perceived mass-produced culture as dangerous to the more technically and intellectually difficult high arts. In contrast, true psychological needs are freedom, creativity, and genuine happiness, which refer to an earlier demarcation of human needs, established by Herbert Marcuse. (See Eros and Civilization, 1955).

      Members of The Frankfurt School were much influenced by the dialectical materialism and historical materialism of Karl Marx, as well as the revisitation of the dialectical idealism of Hegel; both events are studied not in isolation, but as part of the process of change. As a group later joined by Jürgen Habermas, they were responsible for the formulation of critical theory. In works such as Dialectic of Enlightenment and Negative Dialectics, Adorno and Horkheimer theorized that the phenomenon of mass culture has a political implication, namely that all the many forms of popular culture are parts of a single culture industry whose purpose is to ensure the continued obedience of the masses to market interests.

      • Karl Marx's theories of alienation and commodity fetishism,
      • Max Weber's instrumental reason, and
      • Georg Lukacs' concept of the reification of consciousness.
      • Durham Peters, John (2003). The Subtlety of Horkheimer and Adorno. Cambridge: Polity Press. ISBN . 
      • Scannell, Paddy (2007). Media and Communication. London: SAGE. ISBN . 
      • Hansen, M (1992). "Mass Culture as Hieroglyphic Writing: Adorno, Derrida, Kraceuer". New German Critique. 56 (56). 
      • Adorno, T. W. Negative Dialectics. New York: The Seabury Press. (1973)
      • Adorno, T.W. A Sample of Adorno's ideas on the culture industry and popular music (Archive)
      • Adorno, T., & Horkheimer, M. Dialectic of Enlightenment. Stanford University Press (2002)
      • Cook, D. The Culture Industry Revisited. Rowman & Littlefield. (1996)
      • Hesmondhalgh, D. The Cultural Industries. Sage. (2002)
      • Marcuse, H. Eros and Civilization. Beacon. (1955)
      • Steinert, H. Culture Industry. Cambridge: Polity (2003)
      • Wiggershaus, R. The Frankfurt School: its History, Theories, and Political Significance. MIT Press. (1994)
      • Witkin, R.W. Adorno on Popular Culture. Routledge. (2003)
      • Scott, Allen J. The Cultural Economy of Cities. Sage. (2001)
  • What Else?

    • Culture industry