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  • Climate of the Nordic countries

    Climate of the Nordic countries


    • The climate of the Nordic countries is that of a region in Northern Europe that consists of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden and their associated territories, which include the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Åland. , Sweden has on average the warmest summer of the Nordic countries, with an average maximum temperature of 23 °C (73 °F) in July; Copenhagen, Oslo and Helsinki have an average July maximum temperature of 22 °C (72 °F).

      In Denmark, January temperatures average between −2 °C (28 °F) and 4 °C (39 °F). Denmark's coldest month, however, is February, where the mean temperature is 0 °C (32 °F). The amount of hours of sunlight per day does increase during the month of February for Denmark, where they get seven to eight hours a day.Iceland winters are generally mild considering how high its latitude is. The coastal lowlands of Iceland have average January temperatures of about 0 °C (32 °F), while the highlands of central Iceland generally stay below −10 °C (14 °F). The lowest winter temperatures in Iceland are usually somewhere between −25 °C (−13 °F) and −30 °C (−22 °F), although the lowest temperature ever recorded on Iceland was −39.7 °C (−39 °F). In Norway, the coastal regions have mild winters, while further inland winter is much colder. During midwinter, southern areas of Norway only get five to six hours of sunlight a day, while the north gets little to none. In January, the average temperature in Norway is somewhere in between −6 °C (21 °F) and 3 °C (37 °F). Like neighboring Norway, Finland averages −6 °C (21 °F) to 1 °C (34 °F) in the month of January. Finnish areas north of the Arctic Circle rarely see the sun rise, due to the natural phenomenon of the polar night. In January and February, temperatures in this area can drop to −15 °C (5 °F). In February, Northern Finland sees about four to six hours of daylight a day.



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