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  • Voting

    Voting

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    • Assembly votes

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    • Vote counting

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    • Elections

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    • Expatriate voting

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    • Instant-runoff voting

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    • Election and voting-related organizations

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    • Political whips

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    • Referendums

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    • Voter registration

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    • Voter suppression

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    • Voting theory

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    • Voting in the United States

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    • Voting

    • Voting

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    • Altruism theory of voting

    • The altruism theory of voting is a model of voter behavior which states that if citizens in a democracy have “social” preferences for the welfare of others, the extremely low probability of a single vote determining an election will be outweighed by the large cumulative benefits society will receive from the ... Read »


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    • Arsalyn Program

    • The Arsalyn Program of Ludwick Family Foundation (formerly Arsalyn Foundation) is a small 501(c)(3)non-profit foundation in the United States headquartered in Glendora, California. It is dedicated to increasing youth civic engagement. It is categorized under Voter Education/Registration programs Arsalyn Program's miss ... Read »


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    • Voting bloc

    • A voting bloc is a group of voters that are strongly motivated by a specific common concern or group of concerns to the point that such specific concerns tend to dominate their voting patterns, causing them to vote together in elections. For example, Beliefnet identifies 12 main religious blocs in American politics, in ... Read »


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    • Cleavage (politics)

    • In political science, cleavage is the division of voters into voting blocs. The preliminary assumption is that voters do not come in predefined groups of pros and cons for or against a certain subject. Ballot analysis assumes that voters opt for a certain party or decide for the solution or option that comes closest t ... Read »


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    • Cognitive Madisonianism

    • Cognitive Madisonianism is the idea that divided government is better than one in which a single party controls both the executive and legislative branches. A relatively large percentage of the populace of the USA [over 20%] purposely votes a split ticket because of this belief, according to "Split-Ticket Voting: The E ... Read »


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    • Compulsory voting

    • Compulsory voting is a system in which voters are obliged to vote in elections or attend a polling place on voting day. If an eligible voter does not attend a polling place, or lodge a postal vote, he or she may be subject to a penalty such as fines or community service. As of August 2013[update], 22 countries, includi ... Read »


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    • Conscience vote

    • A conscience vote or free vote is a type of vote in a legislative body where legislators are allowed to vote according to their own personal conscience rather than according to an official line set down by their political party. It can also be used to indicate crossbench members of a hung parliament where confidence an ... Read »


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    • Vote counting

    • There exist various methods through which the ballots cast at an election may be counted, prior to applying a voting system to obtain one or more winners. Manual counting requires a physical ballot that represents voter intent. The physical ballots are read and interpreted; then results are individually tabulated. ... Read »


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    • Degressive proportionality

    • Degressive proportionality is an approach to the allocation (between regions, states or other subdivisions) of seats in a legislature or other decision-making body. Degressive proportionality means that while the subdivisions do not each elect an equal number of members, smaller subdivisions are allocated more seats th ... Read »


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    • Demeny voting

    • Demeny voting is the provision of a political voice for children by allowing parents or guardians to vote on their behalf. The term was coined by Warren C. Sanderson in 2007. Under a Demeny voting system, each parent would cast a proxy vote, worth half a vote, for each of their dependent children, thus allowing for a s ... Read »


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    • Early voting

    • Early voting (also called pre-poll voting or advance polling) is a process by which voters in a public election can vote prior to the scheduled election day. Early voting can take place remotely, such as via postal voting, or in person, usually in designated early voting polling stations. The availability and time peri ... Read »


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    • Electronic voting

    • Electronic voting (also known as e-voting) is voting using electronic means to either aid or take care of the chores of casting and counting votes. Depending on the particular implementation, e-voting may encompass a range of Internet services, from basic data transmission to full-function online voting through common ... Read »


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    • Voting gender gap in the United States

    • The voting gender gap is the difference in voting turnout between men and women . With the advent of women's suffrage in 1920 many women were off to the polls. But in recent history women have exceeded men in voter turnout. From 1976 to 2008 women have steadily spread the gap. For more than 60 years after womenâ ... Read »


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    • Golden Week (Ohio)

    • Golden Week is the colloquial term for a unique period of early voting time during Ohio's election season in which citizens can register to vote and cast an absentee ballot on the same day. Golden Week was created in 2005 with new early voting legislation that allowed voters to cast absentee ballots up to 35 days ... Read »


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    • Voting in Guam

    • Voting rights of citizens in Guam differ from those of United States citizens in each of the fifty states. In the U.S. House of Representatives, Guam is entitled to a delegate, who is not allowed to vote on the floor of the House, but can vote on procedural matters and in House committees. Citizens of Guam may not vote ... Read »


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    • Voter ID laws

    • A voter ID law is a law that requires a person to show some form of identification in order to vote or receive a ballot for an election. In jurisdictions requiring voter IDs, the voters must present a photo ID. Because of perceptions of a differing means to obtain identification on the basis of socioeconomic status, ag ... Read »


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    • Issue voting

    • Issue voting

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    • Likely voter

    • Voter segments in political polling in the United States consist of all adults, registered voters, and likely voters. Political opinion polling in the United States usually surveys one of three population segments. According to the American Association for Public Opinion Research, "there is a consensus in the pol ... Read »


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    • LiquidFeedback

    • LiquidFeedback

      LiquidFeedback (abbreviated lqfb) is free software for political opinion formation and decision making, combining aspects of representative and direct democracy. Its most important feature is the implementation of a delegated voting system ("liquid democracy") which is to establish a new form of political representatio ... Read »


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    • Maskin monotonicity

    • Maskin monotonicity is a desired property of voting systems, suggested by Eric Maskin. We are dealing with voting systems that work in the following way. Each voter reports his entire preference relation over the set of alternatives. The set of reports is called a preference profile. A social choice rule maps the pref ... Read »


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    • Mathematical elimination

    • The terms "mathematical elimination" and "mathematically eliminated" mean to be excluded in a decision, based on numerical counts, due to insufficient total numbers, even if all remaining events were 100% in favor. The excluded outcome is considered to be eliminated due to the mathematical probability being zero (0%). ... Read »


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    • Mathematically eliminated

    • The terms "mathematical elimination" and "mathematically eliminated" mean to be excluded in a decision, based on numerical counts, due to insufficient total numbers, even if all remaining events were 100% in favor. The excluded outcome is considered to be eliminated due to the mathematical probability being zero (0%). ... Read »


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    • Motion of no confidence

    • A motion of no confidence (alternatively vote of no confidence, no-confidence motion, or (unsuccessful) confidence motion) is a statement or vote that a person or persons in a position of responsibility (government, managerial, etc.) is no longer deemed fit to hold that position: perhaps because they are inadequate in ... Read »


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    • Neighbourhood effect

    • The neighbourhood effect is an economic and social science concept that posits that neighbourhoods have either a direct or indirect effect on individual behaviors. Although the effect of the neighbourhood was already known and studied at the beginning of the 20th century and as early as the mid 19th century, it has bec ... Read »


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    • Party-line vote

    • A party-line vote in a deliberative assembly (such as a constituent assembly, parliament, or legislature) is a vote in which a substantial majority of members of a political party vote the same way (usually in opposition to the other political party(ies) whose members vote the opposite way). The term implies that the d ... Read »


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    • Postal voting

    • Postal voting is voting in an election whereby ballot papers are distributed to electors or returned by post, in contrast to electors voting in person at a polling station or electronically via an electronic voting system. As postal votes must be distributed and placed in return mail before the scheduled election day, ... Read »


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    • Protest vote

    • A protest vote (also known as a blank vote or white vote) is a vote cast in an election to demonstrate the voter's dissatisfaction with the choice of candidates or refusal of the current political system. In this latter case, protest vote may take the form of a valid vote, but instead of voting for the mainstream candi ... Read »


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    • Referendum

    • A referendum (plural referendums, see below) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to vote on a particular proposal. This may result in the adoption of a new law. In some countries it is synonymous with a plebiscite or a vote on a ballot question. Some definitions of 'plebiscite' suggest that it is a ... Read »


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    • Right of foreigners to vote in Switzerland

    • The right of foreigners to vote in Switzerland is an ongoing political issue in the country. Switzerland is a federal nation. As such, the cantons have extensive powers to enact their own legislation (similar to the arrangement in the states of the United States). For this reason, the rules regarding the rights of fore ... Read »


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    • Scantegrity

    • Scantegrity is a security enhancement for optical scan voting systems, providing such systems with end-to-end (E2E) verifiability of election results. It uses confirmation codes to allow a voter to prove to themselves that their ballot is included unmodified in the final tally. The codes are privacy-preserving and offe ... Read »


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    • Secret ballot

    • The secret ballot is a voting method in which a voter's choices in an election or a referendum are anonymous, forestalling attempts to influence the voter by intimidation and potential vote buying. The system is one means of achieving the goal of political privacy. Secret ballots are used in conjunction with many diff ... Read »


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    • Sincere voting

    • Sincere voting is casting a vote for an outcome that the voter prefers above all others. In an election, sincere voting is formally choosing the voter's most preferred candidate. It might initially seem that all voting would be sincere, since voting is a method for individuals to contribute to a group decision by expre ... Read »


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    • Split-ticket voting

    • Split-ticket voting refers to when a voter in an election votes for candidates from different political parties when multiple offices are being decided by a single election, as opposed to straight-ticket voting, where a voter chooses candidates from the same political party for every office up for election. In Aus ... Read »


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    • Straight-ticket voting

    • Straight-ticket voting or straight-party voting is the practice of voting for every candidate that a political party has on a general election ballot. In general, straight-ticket voting was a very common occurrence up until around the 1960s and 1970s. Since that time, straight-ticket voting has declined in the United S ... Read »


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    • Tactile voting device

    • A tactile voting device is a plastic device that can be fixed onto a ballot paper to enable visually impaired people to mark their ballot paper in secret. The device consists of a number of flaps. Each flap covers a box when the device is fixed onto a ballot paper and is numbered (the number contrasts well against the ... Read »


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    • Unanimity

    • Unanimity is agreement by all people in a given situation. Groups may consider unanimous decisions as a sign of agreement, solidarity, and unity. Unanimity may be assumed explicitly after a unanimous vote or implicitly by a lack of objections. It does not necessarily mean uniformity and can sometimes be the opposite of ... Read »


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    • Voting rights in the United States

    • The issue of voting rights in the United States, specifically the enfranchisement and disenfranchisement of different groups, has been contested throughout United States history. Eligibility to vote in the United States is established both through the federal constitution and by state law. Several constitutional amend ... Read »


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