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  • Veto

    Veto

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Veto

    • Vetoed United Nations Security Council resolutions

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Vetoed United Nations Security Council resolutions


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    • Veto

    • A veto – Latin for "I forbid" – is the power (used by an officer of the state, for example) to unilaterally stop an official action, especially the enactment of legislation. A veto can be absolute, as for instance in the United Nations Security Council, whose permanent members (China, France, Russia, United K ... Read »


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    • Clinton v. City of New York

    • Clinton v. City of New York

      Clinton v. City of New York, 524 U.S. 417 (1998), is a legal case in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the line-item veto as granted in the Line Item Veto Act of 1996 violated the Presentment Clause of the United States Constitution because it impermissibly gave the President of the United States ... Read »


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    • Frankenstein veto

    • A Frankenstein veto occurs when an American state Governor selectively deletes words from a bill, stitching together the remainder (à la Victor Frankenstein) to form a new bill different from that passed by the legislature. The practice requires that a Governor have (or successfully claim) the power to veto individ ... Read »


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    • Heckler's veto


    • Immigration and Naturalization Service v. Chadha

    • Immigration and Naturalization Service v. Chadha

      Immigration and Naturalization Service v. Chadha, 462 U.S. 919 (1983), was a United States Supreme Court case ruling in 1983 that the one-house legislative veto violated the constitutional separation of powers. Section 244(a)(1) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. § 1254(a)(1), authorized the ... Read »


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    • Jus exclusivae

    • Jus exclusivæ (Latin for "right of exclusion"; sometimes called the papal veto) was the right claimed by several Catholic monarchs of Europe to veto a candidate for the papacy. The French monarch, the Spanish monarch, the Holy Roman Emperor, and the Emperor of Austria calimed this right at various times, making know ... Read »


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    • Liberum veto

    • The liberum veto (Latin for "free veto") was a parliamentary device in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. It was a form of unanimity voting rule that allowed any member of the Sejm (legislature) to force an immediate end to the current session and to nullify any legislation that had already been passed at the ses ... Read »


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    • Line-item veto

    • The line-item veto, or partial veto, is a special form of veto that authorizes a chief executive to reject particular provisions of a bill enacted by a legislature without vetoing the entire bill. Many countries have different standards for invoking the line-item veto, if it exists at all. Each country or state has its ... Read »


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    • Line-item veto in the United States

    • In United States government, the line-item veto, or partial veto, is the power of an executive authority to nullify or cancel specific provisions of a bill, usually a budget appropriations bill, without vetoing the entire legislative package. The line-item vetoes are usually subject to the possibility of legislative ov ... Read »


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    • List of United States presidential vetoes

    • The phrase presidential veto does not appear in the United States Constitution, but Article I requires every bill, order, resolution or other act of legislation by the Congress of the United States to be presented to the President of the United States for his approval. When the President is presented the bill, he can e ... Read »


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    • Maysville Road veto

    • The Maysville Road veto occurred on May 27, 1830, when United States President Andrew Jackson vetoed a bill that would allow the federal government to purchase stock in the Maysville, Washington, Paris, and Lexington Turnpike Road Company, which had been organized to construct a road linking Lexington to Maysville on t ... Read »


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    • Veto Players

    • Veto Players: How Political Institutions Work is a book written by political science professor George Tsebelis in 2002. It is a game theory analysis of political behavior. In this work Tsebelis uses the concept of the veto player as a tool for analysing the outcomes of political systems. His primary focus is on legisl ... Read »


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    • Pocket veto

    • A pocket veto is a legislative maneuver that allows a president or other official with veto power to exercise that power over a bill by taking no action (instead of affirmatively vetoing it). The President of Finland has the power to pocket veto bills passed by the parliament; however, such vetoes are temporary in ... Read »


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    • Pocket Veto Case

    • Pocket Veto Case

      The Pocket Veto Case (also known as Bands of the State of Washington v. United States and Okanogan, Methow, San Poelis, Nespelem, Colville, and Lake Indian Tribes v. United States) 279 U.S. 655 (1929) was a 1929 United States Supreme Court decision which interpreted the Constitutional provisions regarding the pocket ve ... Read »


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    • Rivers and Harbors Bill

    • The Rivers and Harbors Bill was a bill passed by Congress in 1846 to provide $500,000 to improve rivers and harbors. When the Senate passed the Rivers and Harbors Bill 34 to 16 on July 24, 1846, opponents lobbied for a presidential veto. It was vetoed by President James K. Polk on August 3. The bill would have provided ... Read »


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    • Scottish Militia Bill

    • The Scottish Militia Bill (known formerly as the Scotch Militia Bill) is the usual name given to a bill that was passed by the House of Commons and House of Lords of the Parliament of Great Britain in early 1708. However, on 11 March 1708,Queen Anne withheld royal assent on the advice of her ministers for fear that the ... Read »


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    • United Nations Security Council veto power

    • The United Nations Security Council "power of veto" refers to the veto power wielded solely by the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council (China, France, Russia, United Kingdom, and United States), enabling them to prevent the adoption of any "substantive" resolution. Abstention or absence from t ... Read »


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    • Veto

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