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    Textiles

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Textiles

    • Clothing by material

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    • Dyes

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    • Fabrics

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    • Featherwork

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    • Fibers

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    • Textile industry

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    • Notions (sewing)

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    • Textile patterns

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    • Rugs and carpets

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    • Textile schools

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    • Textile arts

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    • Textile machinery

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    • Textile stubs

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    • HeiQ

    • HeiQ Materials AG (German pronunciation: [ˈhaɪkju]) is a Swiss specialty chemistry company, headquartered in Zurich, Switzerland. It was founded in 2005 as a spin-off of Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH). HeiQ produces and sells textile finishing and other auxiliaries. But its core business acti ... Read »


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    • Textile

    • A textile or cloth is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread). Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, or other material to produce long strands. Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or felting. The words fabric and ... Read »


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    • African textiles

    • Some of the oldest surviving African textiles were discovered at the archaeological site of Kissi in northern Burkina Faso. They are made of wool or fine animal hair in a weft-faced plain weave pattern. Further cloth fragments and parchment fragments date to the ninth century from sites at Igbo Ukwu of the Igbo people ... Read »


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    • Alnage

    • Alnage, or aulnage (from Fr. aune, ell) is the official supervision of the shape and quality of manufactured woollen cloth. It was first ordered in the reign of Richard I that "woollen cloths, wherever they are made, shall be of the same width, to wit, of two ells within the lists, and of the same goodness in the midd ... Read »


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    • Baldachin

    • A baldachin, or baldaquin (from Italian: baldacchino), is a canopy of state typically placed over an altar or throne. It had its beginnings as a cloth canopy, but in other cases it is a sturdy, permanent architectural feature, particularly over high altars in cathedrals, where such a structure is more correctly called ... Read »


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    • Bamboo textile

    • Bamboo textiles are cloth, yarn, and clothing made out of bamboo fibres. While historically used only for structural elements, such as bustles and the ribs of corsets, in recent years a range of technologies have been developed allowing bamboo fibre to be used in a wide range of textile and fashion applications. Modern ... Read »


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    • Basha (tarpaulin)

    • A Basha is a waterproof canvas or plastic sheet with eyelets or loops on the perimeter, which is used in camping, outdoor, or military situations to act as a shelter, in the form of an impromptu tent and/or groundsheet, usually supported with rope or even bungee cords attached to trees. They are used by the milita ... Read »


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    • Beetling

    • Beetling is the pounding of linen or cotton fabric to give a flat, lustrous effect. Within Ireland, beetling was first introduced by Hamilton Maxwell in 1725. Beetling is part of the finishing of the linen cloth. The hammering tightens the weave and give the cloth a smooth feel. The process was gradually phased out, i ... Read »


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    • Bernhard Altmann

    • Bernhard Altmann (1888 – 1980) was an Austrian textile manufacturer who introduced cashmere wool to North America on a mass scale in 1947. Altmann was the son of Karoline Keile (Tischler) and Karl Chaskel Altmann. His family was Jewish. He entered the textile trade in Vienna in 1915, and in 1919 founded his knitw ... Read »


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    • Biotextile

    • Biotextiles are structures composed of textile fibers designed for use in specific biological environments where their performance depends on biocompatibility and biostability with cells and biological fluids. Biotextiles include implantible devices such as surgical sutures, hernia repair fabrics, arterial grafts, arti ... Read »


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    • Bleachfield

    • A bleachfield or croft was an open area of land (usually a field) used for spreading cloth and fabrics on the ground to be bleached by the action of the sun and water. They were usually found in and around mill towns in Great Britain and were an integral part of textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution. In ... Read »


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    • Boro (textile)

    • Boro (Japanese: ぼろ) are a class of Japanese textiles that have been mended or patched together. The term is derived from Japanese boroboro, meaning something tattered or repaired. As hemp was more widely available in Japan than cotton, they were often woven together for warmth. Hemp usage was neccesitated by ... Read »


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    • Eleanor Burns

    • Eleanor Burns was born on July 3, 1945 in Pennsylvania. She first started stitching on her Aunt Edna's feed sacks. Her first book Make a Quilt in a Day: Log Cabin Pattern was self-published in 1978. Her Quilt in a Day TV series first aired in 1990. ... Read »


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    • Calendering

    • Calendering is a finishing process used on cloth, paper, or plastic film. A calender is employed, usually to smooth, coat, or thin a material. With textiles, fabric is passed under rollers at high temperatures and pressures. Calendering is used on fabrics such as moire to produce its watered effect and also on cambric ... Read »


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    • Carpet

    • A carpet is a textile floor covering typically consisting of an upper layer of pile attached to a backing. The pile was traditionally made from wool, but, since the 20th century, synthetic fibers such as polypropylene, nylon or polyester are often used, as these fibers are less expensive than wool. The pile usually con ... Read »


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    • Cellular textile

    • An alternative way of producing textiles that is very different than both knitting & weaving. Cellular Textiles, produced using additive manufacturing, are defined by their complex interlocking parts. A single base unit geometry is created, with variable parts. By repeating these base units over a surface while changin ... Read »


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    • Cellulose fiber

    • Cellulose fibers (/ˈsɛl.jəˌloʊsˈfaɪ.bər/) are fibers made with ether or esters of cellulose, which can be obtained from the bark, wood or leaves of plants, or from a plant-based material. Besides cellulose, these fibers are compound of hemicellulose and lignin, and different percentages of these ... Read »


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    • Chloroorganic carrier

    • The chloroorganic carrier is a group of molecules that aids the transport of dyes into a fiber. ... Read »


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    • Colour fastness

    • Color fastness is a term—used in the dyeing of textile materials—that characterizes a material's color's resistance to fading or running. The term is usually used in the context of clothes. The first known use of the word was in 1916. In general, clothing should be tested for colorfastness before using bleac ... Read »


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    • Conservation and restoration of flags and banners

    • The conservation and restoration of flags and banners is the process by which conservators work to preserve and restore flags and banners from future deterioration and damage. As a part of Conservation of Textiles, flag and banner conservation require the care of a skilled and well trained textile conservator, specific ... Read »


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    • Conservation and restoration of textiles

    • The conservation and restoration of textiles refers to the processes by which textiles are cared for and maintained to be preserved from future damage. The field falls under the category of art conservation as well as library preservation, depending on the type of collection. In this case, the concept of textile preser ... Read »


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    • Cosmetic textile

    • Cosmetic textiles are the functional textiles, including garments, underwear which come in direct contact with the skin through the process of microencapsulation. They concern the treatment of the skin for a cosmetic approach (for example, the orange peel effect), but can also be a vehicle for other active functions, s ... Read »


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    • Cosmetotextile

    • Cosmetotextile is a technology merging cosmetics and textiles through the process of micro-encapsulation. According to the Bureau de Normalisation des Industries Textiles et de l'Habillement (BNITH), “a cosmetotextile is a textile consumer article containing durably a cosmetic product which is released over time. ... Read »


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    • Decatising

    • Decatising or decatizing, also known as crabbing, blowing, and decating, is the process of making permanent a textile finish on a cloth, so that it does not shrink during garment making. The word comes from the French , which means to remove the or finish of the wool. Though used mainly for wool, the term is also appl ... Read »


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    • Delustrant

    • A delustrant is a substance that reduces the lustre (sheen) of synthetic fibres. The most common delustrant is anatase titanium dioxide. Synthetic fibres such as nylon are normally extremely shiny and transparent when extruded. Adding powdered titanium dioxide causes the surface of the fibres to be rougher, reducing t ... Read »


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    • Dermotextile

    • Dermotextile is a natural and visual alternative to cosmetotextile in merging selected skincare active ingredients to different types of support like textiles. With the dermotextile technology, textiles are printed with a continuous controlled release system composed of bio-based microparticles carrying dispersed skinc ... Read »


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    • Desizing

    • Definision of safa saeed Sizing agents are selected on the basis of type of fabric, environmental friendliness, ease of removal, cost considerations, effluent treatment, etc. Natural sizing agents are based on natural substances and their derivatives: Desizing, irrespective of what the desizing agent is, involve ... Read »


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    • Devoré


    • Doubling (textiles)

    • Cotton Manufacturing Processes

      Doubling is a textile industry term synonymous with combining. It can be used for various processes during spinning. During the carding stage, several sources of roving are doubled together and drawn, to remove variations in thickness. After spinning, yarn is doubled for many reasons. Yarn may be doubled to produce war ... Read »


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    • Dowlas

    • Dowlas is the name given to a plain cloth, similar to sheeting, but usually coarser. It is made in several qualities, from line warp and weft to two warp and weft, and is used chiefly for aprons, pocketing, soldiers' gaiters, linings and overalls. The finer makes are sometimes made into shirts for workmen, and occasio ... Read »


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    • Dyeing

    • Dyeing is the process of adding color to textile products like fibers, yarns, and fabrics. Dyeing is normally done in a special solution containing dyes and particular chemical material. After dyeing, dye molecules have uncut chemical bond with fiber molecules. The temperature and time controlling are two key factors i ... Read »


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    • Fabrikoid

    • Fabrikoid was an imitation leather manufactured by DuPont. Fabrikoid consists of cotton cloth coated with nitrocellulose. Among other uses it has been used for luggage, bookbinding, upholstery and dress trimmings. By the 1920s Fabrikoid was used heavily in both automobile seat covers and the tops of covertible automob ... Read »


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    • Fiber

    • Fiber or fibre (from the Latin fibra) is a natural or synthetic substance that is significantly longer than it is wide. Fibers are often used in the manufacture of other materials. The strongest engineering materials often incorporate fibers, for example carbon fiber and ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. Synth ... Read »


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    • Fish fur

    • Fish fur (Russian: рыбий мех) is a Russian language ironic expression used to describe poor quality of coats and other clothes worn for warmth. In modern times it is also used for fake fur, especially of poor quality. The term traces back to a Russian proverb "A poor man's fur coat is of fish fu ... Read »


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    • Fly (tent)

    • A fly refers to the outer layer of a tent or to a piece of material which is strung up using rope as a minimalist, stand-alone shelter. In basic terms, a fly is a tent without walls. Purpose-made stand-alone flies are also sometimes referred to as bivouacs, bivvies, tarpaulins, or hootchies. Flies are generally used fo ... Read »


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    • Fulling

    • Fulling, also known as tucking or walking (spelt waulking in Scotland), is a step in woollen clothmaking which involves the cleansing of cloth (particularly wool) to eliminate oils, dirt, and other impurities, and making it thicker. The worker who does the job is a fuller, tucker, or walker, all of which have become co ... Read »


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    • Glossary of textile manufacturing

    • The manufacture of textiles is one of the oldest of human technologies. To make textiles, the first requirement is a source of fibre from which a yarn can be made, primarily by spinning. (Both fibre and fiber are used in this article.) The yarn is processed by knitting or weaving, which turns yarn into cloth. The machi ... Read »


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    • Green textile

    • Green textiles are farmed, processed and manufactured with minimal impact on the environment with regard to energy, resource, raw material usage; greenhouse gases / Carbon dioxide emissions; toxic emissions and waste generation. ... Read »


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    • Handle-o-Meter

    • The Handle-o-Meter is a testing machine developed by Johnson & Johnson and now manufactured by Thwing-Albert that measures the "handle", i.e. a combination of surface friction and flexibility of sheeted materials. Originally it was used to test the durability and flexibility of toilet paper and paper towels. The test ... Read »


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    • Heatsetting

    • Heat setting is a term used in the textile industry to describe a thermal process taking place mostly in either a steam atmosphere or a dry heat environment. The effect of the process gives fibers, yarns or fabric dimensional stability and, very often, other desirable attributes like higher volume, wrinkle resistance o ... Read »


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    • History of clothing and textiles

    • The study of the history of clothing and textiles traces the availability and use of textiles and other materials and the development of technology for the making of clothing over human history. The wearing of clothing is exclusively a human characteristic and is a feature of most human societies. It is not known when ... Read »


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    • Hydroentanglement

    • Hydroentanglement is a bonding process for wet or dry fibrous webs made by either carding, airlaying or wet-laying, the resulting bonded fabric being a nonwoven. It uses fine, high pressure jets of water which penetrate the web, hit the conveyor belt (or "wire" as in papermaking conveyor) and bounce back causing the fi ... Read »


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    • Indienne

    • Indienne (/ˌændiˈɛn/, ahn-dee-EN, French pronunciation: ​[ɛ̃ˈdyɛn], "that which comes from Eastern India"), was a type of printed or painted textile manufactured in Europe between the 17th and the 19th centuries and resembling similar textile originally made in India (hence the name). Th ... Read »


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    • J.L.Stifel and Sons

    • J.L.Stifel & Sons was an American textile and jeans manufacturing brand which became prominent from 1835 to 1956 and a precursor one in indigo-dyed cotton calicos. Smoother than canvas or denim but very resistant, calico made success in workwear clothing. Typical calicos such as polka dots, flowers and dotted lines on ... Read »


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    • Kani Shawl

    • A Kani shawl is a type of shawl originating from the Kanihama area of Kashmir. It is one of the oldest handicraft of Kashmir. This craft has been a part of the valley since the time of Mughals. The shawls are woven from pashmina yarn. The government of Jammu and Kashmir has granted a geographical indication to the Kani ... Read »


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    • Kerry Woollen Mills

    • Kerry Woollen Mills are historic wool mills based just off the Ring of Kerry. Kerry Woollen Mills are one of the last remaining traditional wool mills still manufacturing in County Kerry. The company was founded over 300 years ago. The mill's machinery was originally driven by the River Gweestin, and its water was als ... Read »


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    • Kiswah

    • Kiswah (Arabic: كسوة الكعبة‎‎, kiswat al-ka'bah) is the cloth that covers the Kaaba in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. It is draped annually on the 9th day of the month of Dhu al-Hijjah, the day pilgrims leave for the plains of Mount Arafat during the Hajj. The term kiswah is Arabic for '', ... Read »


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    • Koinobori

    • Koinobori (鯉のぼり?), meaning "carp streamer" in Japanese, are carp-shaped wind socks traditionally flown in Japan to celebrate Tango no sekku (端午の節句?), a traditional calendrical event which is now designated a national holiday; Children's Day (Kodomo no Hi, 子供の ... Read »


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    • Kongo textiles

    • In the Kongo Kingdom, the woven arts were emblematic of kingship and nobility. The coarse filament stripped from the fronds of the raffia palm tree served as the foundation of the Kongo weaving arts. This material imposed constraints that were overcome to produce varied and ingenious textile formats and structures. ... Read »


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    • Lenticular fabric

    • A lenticular fabric is a lattice-like arrangement of lens-shaped materials formed into a thin layer. When the surface of the fabric is smooth, it often has a reflective and light-distorting appearance. Lenticular fabrics are found in nature. Geological forces can produce lenticular fabrics consisting of quartz "mi ... Read »


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    • Linen tester

    • A linen tester is a strong magnifier with a measuring scale and a built-in stand. The linen tester was invented to check the quality of woven fabrics. It is used in the textile industry to measure the number of weft and warp threads within a certain area of fabric. Today, it is more commonly used to measure the line w ... Read »


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    • List of fabrics

    • Fabrics in this list include fabrics that are woven, non-woven, as well as knitted fabrics and netting fabrics, and technical fabrics (such as Gore-Tex and Gannex). A fabric may share the name of the fibre from which it is made if its content is derived entirely from the fibre (such as angora fabric made of 100% angora ... Read »


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    • List of textile fibres

    • Textile fibres can be created from many natural sources (animal hair or fur, insect cocoons as with silk worm cocoons), as well as semisynthetic methods that use naturally occurring polymers, and synthetic methods that use polymer-based materials, and even minerals such as metals to make foils and wires. The textile in ... Read »


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    • Textile manufacturing by pre-industrial methods

    • Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest human activities. The oldest known textiles date back to about 5000 B.C. In order to make textiles, the first requirement is a source of fibre from which a yarn can be made, primarily by spinning. The yarn is processed by knitting or weaving to create cloth. The machine used f ... Read »


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    • Māori traditional textiles


    • Matelassé


    • Mercery

    • Mercery (from French mercerie, the notions trade) initially referred to silk, linen, and fustian textiles imported to England in the 12th century. The term later extended to goods made of these and the sellers of those goods. The term for cloth merchants (from French mercier, "notions dealer") is now largely ob ... Read »


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    • Meritas (cloth)

    • Meritas was a brand of oilcloth first produced in 1869 by A.F.Buchanan and Sons at Montrose, New York. The company was taken over by the Standard Oil Cloth Company which then became part of the Standard Textile Products Company. The range of cloths produced under the Meritas brand was expanded to include composite clot ... Read »


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    • Noil

    • Noil is the short fiber left over from combing wool or spinning silk and used as a decorative additive for many spinning projects, like rovings and yarns. Silk noil is also called "raw silk", although that is a misnomer. As noil is a relatively short fiber, fabric made from noil is weaker and considered less valuable. ... Read »


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    • Paisley shawls

    • The intricately woven, and delicate woollen Paisley shawls were a fashionable item of women's clothing in the 19th century. Although known as the Paisley pattern, the teardrop motif originated in Persia and India, becoming popular in Europe - and synonymous with Paisley - in the 19th century. The Paisley shawl has ... Read »


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    • Performance fabrics

    • Performance fabrics are fabrics engineered for a wide variety of uses where the performance of the fabric is the major parameter. Performance fabrics may be used in for all active wear, sports wear, summer and winter wear, mountain activities, trekking, work wear, in military, as well as urban wear and protective wear. ... Read »


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    • Pidan (textile)

    • A pidan is a type of silk cloth used in Cambodian weddings, funerals, and Buddhist ceremonies as a canopy or tapestry. Pidan are often decorated with images of wats, nāgas, apsaras, scenes from the life of Buddha, Angkor Wat, animals (especially elephants), and plants. ... Read »


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    • Pile (textile)

    • In textiles, pile is the raised surface or nap of a fabric, which is made of upright loops or strands of yarn. Examples of pile textiles are carpets, corduroy, velvet, plush, and Turkish towels. The word is derived from Latin pilus for "hair" The surface and the yarn in these fabrics are also called "pile". In particu ... Read »


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    • Piñatex


    • Pua Kumbu

    • Pua Kumbu is a traditional patterned multicolored ceremonial cotton cloth used by the Iban, made and used in Sarawak, Malaysia. Legends on the origins of Iban weaving There are many legends about the origin of Pua Kumbu, all revolving around the characters of Menggin and Dara Tinchin. The story starts with Menggin, a ... Read »


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    • Shearling

    • Shearling is a skin from a recently sheared sheep or lamb that has been tanned and dressed with the wool left on. It has a suede surface on one side and a clipped fur surface on the other. Usually the suede side is worn outward. Shearling can be made from real sheepskin or from synthetic fibers. Real shearling breathes ... Read »


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    • Singe

    • A singe is a slight scorching, burn or treatment with flame. This may be due to an accident, such as scorching one's hair when lighting a gas fire, or a deliberate method of treatment or removal of hair or other fibres. A singe is a treatment available at a barber's. A lit taper (candle) or other device is used to ... Read »


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    • Snag (textiles)

    • In textiles, a snag is created when a sharp or rough object pulls, plucks, scratches, or drags a group of fibres, yarn, or a yarn segment from its normal pattern. Snags can be classified into three types: Objects that often cause snags are rough fingernails or toenails, or hangnails. When a snag occurs in certain fin ... Read »


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    • Spoonflower

    • Spoonflower is an on-demand, digital printing company that prints custom fabric, wallpaper, and gift wrap. It was founded in May 2008 by Stephen Fraser and Gart Davis, both formerly from Lulu.com. In 2013, Allison Polish joined Spoonflower's management team. It was headquartered in Mebane, North Carolina, USA until 2 ... Read »


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    • Stasilon

    • Stasilon is a brand-name hemostatic woven textile manufactured by Entegrion, Inc. of Durham, North Carolina, USA. It is made from fibers of continuous filament fiberglass and bamboo yarn and used to accelerate clotting and stop bleeding from cuts and abrasions. Originally intended for military use, NATO and United Stat ... Read »


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    • Stone washing

    • Stone washing is a textile manufacturing process used to give a newly manufactured cloth garment a worn-in (or worn-out) appearance. Stone-washing also helps to increase the softness and flexibility of otherwise stiff and rigid fabrics such as canvas and denim. The process uses large stones to roughen up the fabric be ... Read »


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    • Straw plaiting

    • Straw plaiting is a method of manufacturing textiles by braiding straw and the industry that surrounds the craft of producing these straw manufactures. Straw is plaited to produce products including straw hats and ornaments, and the process is undertaken in a number of locations worldwide. To plait comes from late ... Read »


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    • Supplementary weave

    • Supplementary weaving is a decorative technique in which additional threads are woven into a textile to create an ornamental pattern in addition to the ground pattern. The supplementary weave can be of the warp or of the weft. Supplementary weave is commonly used in many of thetextiles of Southeast Asia such as in Bali ... Read »


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    • Tapis (Indonesian weaving style)

    • Tapis (Indonesian: kain tapis) is a traditional weaving style from Lampung, Indonesia. The word tapis also refers to the resulting cloth. It consists of a striped, naturally-coloured cloth embroidered with warped and couched gold thread. Traditionally using floral motifs, it has numeorus variations. It is generally wor ... Read »


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    • Tarpaulin

    • A tarpaulin (US: /ˈtɑːrpəlɪn/, UK: /tɑːrˈpɔːlɪn/), or tarp, is a large sheet of strong, flexible, water-resistant or waterproof material, often cloth such as canvas or polyester coated with urethane, or made of plastics such as polyethylene. In some places such as Australia, and in mili ... Read »


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    • Technical textile

    • A technical textile is a textile product manufactured for non-aesthetic purposes, where function is the primary criterion. Technical textiles include textiles for automotive applications, medical textiles (e.g., implants), geotextiles (reinforcement of embankments), agrotextiles (textiles for crop protection), and prot ... Read »


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    • Tenterground

    • A tenterground or tenter ground was an area used for drying newly manufactured cloth after fulling. The wet cloth was hooked onto frames called tenters and stretched taut so that the cloth would dry flat and square. It is from this process that some have the expression "on tenterhooks", meaning in a state of nervous t ... Read »


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    • Textile bleaching

    • Textile bleaching is one of the stages in the manufacture of textiles. All raw textile materials, when they are in natural form, are known as 'greige' material (pronounced grey-sh). This greige material will have its natural color, odor and impurities that are not suitable for clothing materials. Not only the natural i ... Read »


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    • Textile Labelling Act (Germany)

    • The Textile Labelling Act (Germany) (German: Textilkennzeichnungsgesetz Lit:"Law on the designation of textiles", short TextilKennzG) is a German federal law which was decreed on 1 April 1969. The law was completely rewritten and the new version was announced on 14 August 1986. The law was last changed by decree on 14 ... Read »


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    • Textile recycling

    • How can textiles products be recycled and reused textile products can be recycled by putting it in the bin in clothes banks For consumers the most common way of recycling textiles is reuse through reselling or donating to charity(Goodwill Industries, Salvation Army, etc.). However, certain communities in the Unite ... Read »


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    • Textile sample

    • A textile sample is a piece of cloth or fabric designed to represent a larger whole. A small sample, usually taken from existing fabric, is often called a swatch, whilst a larger sample, made as a trial to test production methods, is called a strike off. The use of swatches is an essential part of the design process ... Read »


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    • Textile stabilization

    • Textile stabilization is a conservation method used to stabilize weak points in textile pieces and prevent further degradation or damage to the fabric. Fabric may be used to provide support for the garment by stabilizing weak sections or by creating a backing or lining for the piece. Darning may be utilized on coa ... Read »


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    • Textile-reinforced concrete

    • Textile-reinforced concrete is a type of reinforced concrete in which the usual steel reinforcing bars are replaced by textile materials. Instead of using a metal cage inside the concrete, this technique uses a fabric cage inside the same. Materials with high tensile strengths with negligible elongation properties ... Read »


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    • Textiles of Mexico

    • The Textiles of Mexico have a long history. The making of fibers, cloth and other textile goods has existed in the country since at least 1400 BCE. Fibers used during the pre-Hispanic period included those from the yucca, palm and maguey plants as well as the use of cotton in the hot lowlands of the south. After the Sp ... Read »


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    • Textiles of Sumba

    • The textiles of Sumba (an island in eastern Indonesia) represents the means by which the present generation passes on its messages to future generations. The pieces are deeply personal, follow distinct systematic form but show the individuality of the weaver and the village from which they are produced. Internationally ... Read »


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    • Thread Routes

    • Thread Routes

      Thread Routes is a 16mm film series by artist Kimsooja. Divided into six chapters, Thread Routes takes place in six different cultural zones around the world. The artist considers her approach to this film as a 'visual poem' and a 'visual anthropology', in that it juxtaposes and presents structural similarities in per ... Read »


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    • Ticking

    • Ticking is a cotton or linen textile that is tightly woven for durability and to prevent down feathers from poking through the fabric, and used to cover mattresses and bed pillows. It commonly has a striped design, in muted colors such as brown, grey or blue, and occasionally red or yellow, against a plain, neutral bac ... Read »


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    • Tog (unit)

    • The tog is a measure of thermal resistance of a unit area, also known as thermal insulance. It is commonly used in the textile industry and often seen quoted on, for example, duvets and carpet underlay. The Shirley Institute in Manchester, England developed the tog as an easy-to-follow alternative to the SI unit of m2 ... Read »


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    • Toran

    • Toran (Hindi: तोरण)is the name in Hinduism (Sanskrit. torana, from tor, pass) of a sacred or honorific gateway in Buddhist architecture. Its typical form is a projecting cross-piece resting on two uprights or posts. It is made of wood or stone, and the cross-piece is generally of three bars placed o ... Read »


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    • Ulos

    • Ulos is the traditional cloth of the Batak people of North Sumatra. Different kinds of ulos have different ceremonial significance. The ulos is normally worn draped over the shoulder or shoulders, or in weddings to ceremonially bind the bride and groom together. Ulos are traditionally hand woven and in the case of high ... Read »


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    • Units of textile measurement

    • Textile fibers, threads, yarns and fabrics are measured in a multiplicity of units. The linear density of a fiber is commonly measured in units of denier or tex. Traditional units include worsted count, cotton count and yield. Tex is more likely to be used in Canada and Continental Europe, while denier remains mor ... Read »


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    • Webbing

    • Webbing is a strong fabric woven as a flat strip or tube of varying width and fibres often used in place of rope. It is a versatile component used in climbing, slacklining, furniture manufacturing, automobile safety, auto racing, towing, parachuting, military apparel, load securing, and many other fields. Originally m ... Read »


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    • Woven fabric

    • Woven fabric is a textile formed by weaving. It is produced on a loom, and made of many threads woven on a warp and a weft. Woven fabric only stretches diagonally on the bias directions (between the warp and weft directions), unless the threads used are elastic. Woven fabric cloth usually frays at the edges, unless t ... Read »


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    • Wrap reel

    • A wrap reel or skein winder is a device for measuring yarn and making it into hanks of a standard size.. The reel is of a standard size and its revolutions are counted as the yarn is wrapped around it. Typically, a set number of revolutions will be used so that the hank is of a standard size — a skein or lea. For ... Read »


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    • Yarn

    • Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery, and ropemaking.Thread is a type of yarn intended for sewing by hand or machine. Modern manufactured sewing threads may be finished with wax or other lubricants to wi ... Read »


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  • What Else?

    • Textiles

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