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    Textile stubs

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Textile stubs

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    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Textile arts stubs


      Wikipedia
    • Abadeh rug

    • An Abaadeh carpet is a type of Persian carpet made in the town of Abadeh in Iran. The rugs are named after the city of Abadeh, halfway between Isfahan and Shiraz in Iran, where these rugs are made. They were traditionally sold to the Qashqai people in their north/south seasonal migration. The rugs often feature a lar ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ahar rug

    • The Ahar carpet is a type of Persian carpet made in the town of Ahar in Ahar County near Mount Sabalan in Iran. Over the last 30 years Ahar carpets have emerged as a recognizable group in the marketplace, and are sold in many parts of Iran outside its town of origin. It is a distinctive carpet in the Heriz group of c ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Airdura

    • Airdura is a synthetic fabric used for motorcycle clothing with summer or warmer riding conditions. The cloth is light and claimed to be "breathable". It is likely to be a play on the name of DuPont's (Invista's) cordura. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Airguard

    • Airguard is a fabric made of polyamide hollow fibres. Air pockets of the fibres provide heat insulation. The polyamide material ensures a degree of abrasion-proofness and tear-resistance. The fabric is used for motorcycle clothing but is definitely unsuitable as a safe outer material. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • All over print

    • In streetwear fashion, an all over print (also known as all-over-print) is a print composed of a design that is repeated across the entire surface of a garment. The image is on both the front and back. Often, such prints are screen-printed. Other processes include dye-diffusion of the fabric itself. All-Over Print ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • American Viscose Corporation

    • American Viscose Corporation was an American division of the British firm Courtaulds, which manufactured rayon and other synthetic fibres. Established in 1909, it became the largest supplier of rayon and the first company to make artificial silk in the United States. American Viscose had plants at Marcus Hook, Pennsyl ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Antique satin

    • Antique satin, also called satin-back shantung, refers to any five or eight harness (shaft) satin weave that uses slubbed or unevenly spun yarns in the weft (filling). It is reversible in that one side is satin and other shantung and is used for simulating 17th and 18th century silks and clothing such as blouses, linge ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Appliqué lace


    • Argentan lace

    • Argentan lace or Point d'Argentan is a needle lace from the 18th century. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Argentella

    • Argentella is a type of needle lace. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Atlas silk

    • Atlas silk or Etles Silk (Uyghur: ئەتلەس,‎, ULY: Etles ,Chinese: 艾德莱斯绸; pinyin: Ài dé lái sÄ« chóu) is a type Ikat Uyghurs used only for woman's clothing. It is kind of silk produced by the atlas moth. One of the largest sites of production is China's f ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Baize

    • Baize is a coarse woollen (or in cheaper variants cotton) cloth. A mid-17th century English ditty (a short, simple popular song)—much quoted in histories of ale and beer brewing in England—refers to 1525 as the year: Hops, heresies, bays, and beer; Came into England all in one year. Heresies refers to ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ballistic nylon

    • Ballistic nylon is a thick, tough, nylon fabric with several uses. Ballistic nylon was developed by the DuPont corporation as a material for flak jackets to be worn by World War II airmen. The term ballistic nylon originates in the fabric's intended function, protecting its wearers from flying debris and fragmentation ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ban-Lon

    • Ban-Lon (sometimes spelled BanLon or Banlon) is a trademarked, multistrand, continuous-filament synthetic yarn used in the retail clothing industry. It is artificially crimped in order to achieve greater bulk than ordinary yarns. It is frequently associated with 1950s and 1960s American clothing and culture, and at the ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Barkcloth

    • Barkcloth or bark cloth is a versatile material that was once common in Asia, Africa, Indonesia, and the Pacific. Barkcloth comes primarily from trees of the Moraceae family, including Broussonetia papyrifera, , and Ficus natalensis. It is made by beating sodden strips of the fibrous inner bark of these trees into shee ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Basketweave

    • Basketweave is a structure that exists in many textile arts. It consists of multiple horizontal strands and vertical strands, resulting in a square pattern associated with woven baskets. It is used in the following textile arts: ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Basketweave (weaving)

    • Basketweave or Panama weave is a simple type of textile weave. In basketweave, groups of warp and weft threads are interlaced so that they form a simple criss-cross pattern. Each group of weft threads crosses an equal number of warp threads by going over one group, then under the next, and so on. The next group of wef ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Beater (weaving)

    • A beater is a weaving tool designed to push the weft yarn securely into place. In small hand weaving such as Inkle weaving and tablet weaving the beater may be combined with the shuttle into a single tool. In rigid heddle looms the beater is combined with the heddles. Beaters appear both in a hand-held form, and as an ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Bed skirt

    • A bed skirt or valance is a piece of decorative fabric that is placed between the mattress and the box spring of a bed. The purpose of a bed skirt is to give a stylish appearance to a bed without exposing the sides of the box spring or any space under the bed that may be used for storage. Historically, bed skirts were ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Bedford cord

    • Bedford cord, named after the town of Bedford in England, is a durable fabric that resembles corduroy. The weave has faint lengthwise ridges, but without the filling yarns that make the distinct wales characteristic of corduroy. It can have the appearance of narrow-width stripes with thin lines between. Because of its ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Beetling

    • Beetling is the pounding of linen or cotton fabric to give a flat, lustrous effect. Within Ireland, beetling was first introduced by Hamilton Maxwell in 1725. Beetling is part of the finishing of the linen cloth. The hammering tightens the weave and give the cloth a smooth feel. The process was gradually phased out, i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Belt press

    • Belt printing is a method for printing. A belt printer uses huge screens that cover the entire front and back of the garment. The method is best for all-over pattern printing, but works best on designs with limited colors. It was largely popular in the 1970s. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Beta cloth

    • Beta cloth is a type of fireproof silica fiber cloth used in the manufacture of Apollo/Skylab A7L space suits, the Apollo Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment, the McDivitt Purse, and in other specialized applications. Beta cloth consists of fine woven silica fiber, similar to fiberglass. The resulting fabric will not burn, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Blackout (fabric)

    • Blackout refers to a foam-backed, opaque fabric used to black out light. Blackout fabrics are most commonly found in hotel rooms as curtain linings or drapery fabrics, blocking much of the light that would otherwise enter through a window when the curtains are closed. For travelers, third shift workers, and parents of ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Bleachfield

    • A bleachfield or croft was an open area of land (usually a field) used for spreading cloth and fabrics on the ground to be bleached by the action of the sun and water. They were usually found in and around mill towns in Great Britain and were an integral part of textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution. In ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Bluing (fabric)

    • Bluing, laundry blue, dolly blue or washing blue is a household product used to improve the appearance of textiles, especially white fabrics. Used during laundering, it adds a trace of blue dye (often synthetic ultramarine, sometimes Prussian blue) to the fabric. White fabrics acquire a slight color cast after use ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Boiled wool

    • Boiled wool is a special type of fabric primarily used in berets, scarves, vests, cardigans, coats and jackets. Created by a mechanical process using water and agitation, shrinking knitted or woven wool or wool-blend fabrics, compressing and interlocking the fibers into a tighter felt-like mass. Wool felt and felt ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Brilliantine (fabric)

    • Brilliantine is a lightweight, mixed-fibre fabric popular from the mid-19th century into the early 20th century. Brilliantine can be plain or twill woven with a wool or mohair weft on a silk or cotton warp. Brilliantine has a lustrous finish and is known for its dust-shedding properties; it was available in solid colo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Buckram

    • Buckram

      Buckram is a stiff cloth, made of cotton, and still occasionally linen, which is used to cover and protect books. Buckram can also be used to stiffen clothes. Modern buckrams have been stiffened by soaking in a substance, usually now pyroxylin, to fill the gaps between the fibres. In the Middle Ages, "bokeram" was fin ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • C change

    • C change is a waterproof and windproof temperature adaptive material developed and produced by Schoeller Textiles. The material contains a membrane layer which is set to a predetermined temperature range. Once the climate inside the garment warms (due to physical exertion or higher ambient temperatures), the polymer m ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Candlewick (fabric)


    • Cedar bark textile

    • Cedar bark textile was used by indigenous people in the Pacific Northwest region of modern-day Canada and the United States. Historically, most items of clothing were made of this material. The name is confusing, as it is made from Thuja (redcedar) and cypress bark, not cedar bark; true cedars are not native to the Ame ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Challis (fabric)

    • Challis, sometimes referred to as challie or chally, is a lightweight woven fabric, originally a silk-and-wool blend, which can also be made from a single fibre, such as cotton, silk or wool, or from man-made fabrics such as rayon. It was first manufactured in Norwich, England, in about 1832, when it was designed as a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Char cloth

    • Char cloth (or charcloth) – also called charpaper – is a swatch of fabric made from vegetable fiber (such as linen, cotton or jute) that has been converted via pyrolysis into a slow-burning fuel of very low ignition temperature. It can be ignited by a single spark that can in turn be used to ignite a tinder b ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Charmeuse

    • Charmeuse (French: [ʃaʁmøːz]) is a lightweight fabric woven with a satin weave, in which the warp threads cross over four or more of the backing (weft) threads. These float threads give the front of the fabric a smooth finish—lustrous and reflective—whereas the back has a dull finish. It can be ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Codilla

    • Codilla is the name given to the broken fibres which are separated from the flax during the scutching process. On this account it is sometimes termed scutching tow. Quantities of this material are used along with heckled tow in the production of tow yarns.  This article incorporates text from a publication now i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cord (sewing)

    • In sewing, cord is a trimming made by twisting or plying two or more strands of yarn together. Cord is used in a number of textile arts including dressmaking, upholstery, macramé, and couching. Soft cotton cord forms the filling for piping. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Coutil

    • Coutil (or Coutille) is woven cloth created specifically for making corsets. It is woven tightly to inhibit penetration of the corset's bones and resist stretching. Coutil has a high cotton content. Cotton has good dimensional stability, or a resistance to stretching, which makes it a good choice for such a stressed ga ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cowhide

    • Cowhide is the natural, unbleached skin and hair of a cow. It retains the original coloring of the animal. Cowhides are a product of the food industry from cattle; other cows are killed specifically for their skin. Cowhide can also be processed into a leather, which can be used to make such things as shoes, wallets, le ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Crimplene

    • Crimplene is a texturised continuous fibre produced by modifying Terylene. The patent was taken out by Mario Nava of Chesline and Crepes Ltd of Macclesfield, and sold to ICI Fibres. ICI licensed the product to various throwsters. The largest producer by far was William Tatton of Leek, and the Golbourne factory was at o ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cuttance

    • Cuttance is a fine heavy and stout silk satin of East India, with bright coloured woven stripes and cotton back, used for upholstery. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cutwork

    • Cutwork or cut work, also known as Punto Tagliato in Italian, is a needlework technique in which portions of a textile, typically cotton or linen, are cut away and the resulting "hole" is reinforced and filled with embroidery or needle lace. Cutwork is related to drawn thread work. In drawn thread work, typically only ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dimity

    • Dimity is a lightweight, sheer cotton fabric, used historically, having at least two warp threads thrown into relief to form fine cords. It is a cloth commonly employed for bed upholstery and curtains, and usually white, though sometimes a pattern is printed on it in colors. It is stout in texture, and woven in raised ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • DMC (company)

    • DMC

      DMC (Dollfus-Mieg and Company) is an Alsatian textile company founded in Mulhouse in 1746 by Jean-Henri Dollfus. Daniel Dollfus, a nephew of Jean-Henri Dollfus, renamed the company "Dollfus-Mieg et Compagnie" on March 21, 1800, after marrying his wife Anne-Marie Mieg. Boxes of DMC cotton Skeins of DMC embroidery cott ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dobby (cloth)

    • Dobby is a woven fabric produced on the dobby loom, characterised by small geometric patterns and extra texture in the cloth. The warp and weft threads may be the same colour or different. Satin threads are particularly effective in this kind of weave as their texture will highlight the pattern. Polo shirts are usuall ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Doubling (textiles)

    • Cotton Manufacturing Processes

      Doubling is a textile industry term synonymous with combining. It can be used for various processes during spinning. During the carding stage, several sources of roving are doubled together and drawn, to remove variations in thickness. After spinning, yarn is doubled for many reasons. Yarn may be doubled to produce war ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dowlas

    • Dowlas is the name given to a plain cloth, similar to sheeting, but usually coarser. It is made in several qualities, from line warp and weft to two warp and weft, and is used chiefly for aprons, pocketing, soldiers' gaiters, linings and overalls. The finer makes are sometimes made into shirts for workmen, and occasio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Drill (fabric)

    • Drill is stout durable cotton fabric with a strong bias (diagonal) in the weave. It can be used unbleached, although it is more often bleached or dyed. Light weight drill is used in clothing items such as shirts, safari jackets, blouses, and sports clothing. The heavier weights were often used in corsets, and are comm ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Drugget

    • Druggett or drugget is "a coarse woollen fabric felted or woven, self-coloured or printed one side". Jonathan Swift refers to being "in druggets drest, of thirteen pence a yard". Formerly, a drugget was a sort of cheap stuff, very thin and narrow, usually made of wool, or half wool and half silk or linen; it may have ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dungaree (fabric)

    • Dungaree fabric (used in English since 1605–15, from the Marathi dongrÄ«) is a historical term for coarse thick 2/2twill-weave cotton cloth, often coloured blue. Cotton twill with indigo dyed warp thread is now more commonly referred to as denim, or more specifically blue denim. The word is possibly derived from ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dupioni

    • Dupioni (also referred to as Douppioni or Dupion) is a plain weave crisp type of silk fabric, produced by using fine thread in the warp and uneven thread reeled from two or more entangled cocoons in the weft. This creates tightly-woven yardage with a highly-lustrous surface. It is similar to shantung, but slightly thic ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Elastolefin

    • Elastolefin is a fibre composed of at least 95% (by weight) of macromolecules partially cross-linked, made of ethylene and at least one other olefin. When stretched to one and a half times its original length, it recovers rapidly to its original length. It therefore will stretch up to 50% and recover. Recent updates to ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Electrically conducting yarn

    • An electrically conducting yarn is a yarn that conducts electricity. Conducting yarns are used to manufacture carpets and other items that dissipate static electricity, such as work clothes in highly flammable environments, e.g., in the petrochemistry industry. There are several methods known to manufacture electrica ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • End-on-end

    • End-on-end (also fil-à-fil) is a type of closely woven, plain weave cloth created by the alternation of light and dark warp and weft threads, resulting in a heathered effect. The English term comes from the French "fil-à-fil", literally "thread-to-thread". It is most commonly woven from cotton or linen fibers. En ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Eolienne

    • Eolienne (also spelled aeolian) is a lightweight fabric with a ribbed (corded) surface. Generally made by combining silk and cotton or silk and worsted warp and weft, it is similar to poplin but of an even lighter weight. In common with poplin, it was originally a dress fabric and the weave combining heavier and light ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ersari carpet

    • The Ersari carpet is a type of carpet handmade by the Ersari Turkmen of Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Even-weave

    • Even-weave fabric or canvas is any woven textile where the warp and weft threads are of the same size. Even-weave fabrics include even-weave aida cloth, linen, and needlepoint canvas. These fabrics are typically required as foundations for counted-thread embroidery styles such as blackwork, cross-stitch, and needl ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Flashspun fabric

    • Flashspun fabric is a nonwoven fabric formed from fine fibrillation of a film by the rapid evaporation of solvent and subsequent bonding during extrusion. A pressurised solution of, for example, HDPE or polypropylene in a solvent such as fluoroform is heated, pressurised and pumped through a hole into a chamber. When ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Flokati rug

    • A flokati rug is a handmade shag wool rug. Making flokatis is a long-time tradition of the Vlachs in the Pindus mountains. The natural color of a flokati rug is off-white, but they may be dyed different colors. The entire rug is wool, including the backing from which the tapered shag emerges. After the rug is woven, it ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Foulard

    • A foulard is a lightweight fabric, either twill or plain-woven, made of silk or a mix of silk and cotton. Foulards usually have a small printed design of various colors. Foulard can also refer by metonymy to articles of clothing, such as scarves and neckties, made from this fabric. In men's ties, foulard refers to the ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Gannex

    • Gannex is a waterproof fabric composed of an outer layer of nylon and an inner layer of wool with air between them and was invented in 1951 by Joseph Kagan, a British industrialist and the founder of Kagan Textiles, of Elland, which made raincoats. Gannex raincoats were worn by Prime Minister Harold Wilson. After Wils ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ganse cord

    • A ganse cord is a type of cord used in millinery to give shape to a hat. It was used extensively in the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly in tricorns, bicornes and shakos used in military uniforms. The cord is tied in a special knot called Noeud de franciscain. The ganse loop made from the cord was also used to hol ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Gassing (textile process)

    • In textile manufacturing, gassing is the process of passing newly spun yarn through a flame to remove the loose fibre ends. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Georgette (fabric)

    • Georgette (from crêpe Georgette) is a sheer, lightweight, dull-finished crêpe fabric named after the early 20th century French dressmaker Georgette de la Plante. Originally made from silk, Georgette is made with highly twisted yarns. Its characteristic crinkly surface is created by alternating S- and Z-twist yar ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Gingham

    • Gingham is a medium-weight balanced plain-woven fabric made from dyed cotton or cotton-blend yarn. It is made of carded, medium or fine yarns, where the colouring is on the warp yarns and always along the grain (weft). Gingham has no right or wrong side with respect to color. The name may originate from the Malay ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Glass cloth

    • Glass cloth is a textile material, originally developed to be used in greenhouse paneling, allowing sunlight's ultraviolet rays to be filtered out, while still allowing visible light through to plants. The cloth is usually woven with the plain weave, and may be patterned in various ways, though checked cloths are the m ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Glen plaid

    • Glen plaid (short for Glen Urquhart plaid) or Glenurquhart check is a woollen fabric with a woven twill design of small and large checks. It is usually made of black/grey and white, or with more muted colours, particularly with two dark and two light stripes alternate with four dark and four light stripes which creates ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Green textile

    • Green textiles are farmed, processed and manufactured with minimal impact on the environment with regard to energy, resource, raw material usage; greenhouse gases / Carbon dioxide emissions; toxic emissions and waste generation. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Margaret Greig

    • Dorothy Margaret Greig née Hannah (1922–1999) was an English mathematician who worked upon the theory of worsted spinning, especially the superdraft system invented by Geoffrey Ambler. During WW2, she worked on the analysis of strategic bombing. She married in 1948 and started lecturing at Leeds University in t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Grenadine (cloth)

    • Grenadine is a weave characterised by its light, open, gauze-like feel, and is produced on jacquard looms. Originally produced in Italy and worn as a black silk lace in France in the eighteenth century, it is now woven with silk for use in ties. For the most part, ties made from grenadine silk are solid in color w ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Grenfell Cloth

    • Grenfell Cloth is a densely-woven cotton gabardine material used to make luxury and outdoor clothing since its creation in 1923. It was named after Sir Wilfred Grenfell, a British medical missionary working extensively in Newfoundland. He required a cloth to be woven to protect himself from the snow, wind, wet and cold ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Haberget


    • Habutai

    • Habutai or Habotai (from the Japanese habutae (羽二重?), literally "feather-two-layer") is one of the most basic plain weaves of silk fabric. While it was traditionally woven in Japan, most Habutai is today woven in China. It is normally a lining silk but can also be used for T-shirts, lampshades, summer bl ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Heather (fabric)

    • In clothing, heather refers to interwoven yarns of mixed colors producing flecks of an alternate color. It is typically used to mix multiple shades of grey or grey with another color to produce a muted shade (e.g., heather green), but any two colors can be mixed, including bright colors. Heather yarn is costly as co ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Himroo

    • Himroo is a fabric made of silk and cotton, which is grown locally in Aurangabad. Himroo was brought to Aurangabad in the reign of Mohammad Tughlaq, when he had shifted his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad, Aurangabad. The word himroo originated from Persian word Hum-ruh which means 'similar'. Himroo is a replication o ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hodden

    • Hodden or wadmel is a coarse kind of cloth made of undyed wool, formerly much worn by the peasantry of Scotland. It was usually made on small hand-looms by the peasants. Hodden grey was made by mixing black and white fleeces together in the proportion of one to twelve when weaving. The origin of the word is unknown. I ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Jarapa

    • Jarapa is a thick fabric of various compositions, used to make traditional rugs, blankets, bedspreads, curtains etc. in Almería and Murcia in the Spanish South East. Manufacture and use are concentrated in the area of the Alpujarras. The material used in their manufacture is often recycled scraps from the textile i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Kemp (wool)

    • Kemp is generally a chalky-white, brittle, weak fibre which may be mixed with normal fibers in a sheep's wool fleece. Kemp fibres are often detached from the skin. This hair is not desirable in a fleece, as it does not accept dye, minimising both the quality and the value of the wool. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Kersey (cloth)

    • Kersey is a kind of coarse woollen cloth that was an important component of the textile trade in Medieval England. It derives its name from kersey yarn and ultimately from the village of Kersey, Suffolk, having presumably originated in that region. However the cloth was made in many places. It was being woven as early ... Read »


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    • Kerseymere

    • Kerseymere is a fine woolen cloth with a fancy twill weave. In printing fine work during the mid-19th century, the blankets that lay between the tympans were either fine kerseymere or superfine woolen cloth. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Kier (industrial)

    • A kier or keeve (or similar spellings) is a large circular boiler or vat used in bleaching or scouring cotton fabric. They were also used for processing paper pulp. In use they were continuously rotated by an engine, steam being supplied through a rotating joint in the axle. They were usually spherical, sometimes cyli ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Kullu shawl

    • A Kullu shawl is a type of shawl made in Kullu, India, featuring various geometrical patterns and bright colors. Originally, indigenous Kulivi people would weave plain shawls, but following the arrival of craftspeople from Bushehar in the early 1940s, the trend of more patterned shawls came to rise. Typical Kullu shaw ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lambswool

    • Lambswool is wool which is 50mm or shorter from the first shearing of a sheep, at around the age of seven months. It is soft, elastic, and slippery, and is used in high-grade textiles. Weaner fleece is wool 50mm or longer from young sheep, that have been shorn for the first time, and which exhibits the characteristic ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lamé (fabric)


    • Laminated fabric

    • A laminated fabric is a two (or more) layer construction with a polymer film bonded to a fabric. Laminated fabrics are used in rainwear, automotive, and other applications. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Landscape fabric

    • Landscape fabric is a textile material used to control weeds by inhibiting their exposure to sunlight. The fabric is normally placed around desirable plants, covering areas where other growth is unwanted. The fabric itself can be made from synthetic or organic materials, sometimes from recycled sources. ... Read »


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    • Lantana (fabric)

    • Lantana is a fabric blended from typically 80% cotton and 20% wool. It may be associated with the Liberty's department store on Regent Street, London. ... Read »


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    • Lawn cloth

    • Lawn cloth or lawn is a plain weave textile, originally of linen but now chiefly cotton. Lawn is designed using fine, high count yarns, which results in a silky, untextured feel. The fabric is made using either combed or carded yarns. When lawn is made using combed yarns, with a soft feel and slight luster, it is known ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Leavers machine

    • The Leavers machine is a lacemaking machine that John Levers adapted from Heathcoat's Old Loughborough machine. It was made in Nottingham in 1813. The name of the machine was the Leavers machine (the 'a' was added to aid pronunciation in France). The original machine made net but it was discovered that the Jacquard app ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Julia Southard Lee


    • Lopi

    • Lopi (Icelandic: [ˈlɔːpɪ]) is knitting wool made from the fleece of Icelandic sheep. The fleece is made up of two layers, each with a different kind of wool. The wet-resistant outer coat contains long, coarse fibres, while the insulating layer beneath consists of soft, short fibres. These are processed t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matelassé


    • Mechanische Baumwollspinnerei und Weberei Augsburg

    • The Mechanische Baumwollspinnerei und Weberei (English: Mechanical cotton spinning and weaving mill) is a cotton mill in Augsburg, Bavaria, Germany. It was founded in 1837 and was considered one of the oldest textile manufacturing companies in Germany. It was closed in 1989. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Milliskin

    • Milliskin is a type of fabric commonly used to make tights and dance leotards. It was used to make the Superman costume in the movie Superman Returns (2006). Milliskin is characterized by being very light, thin, and stretchy. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Moquette

    • Moquette, derived from the French word for carpet, is a type of woven pile fabric in which cut or uncut threads form a short dense cut or loop pile. As well as giving it a distinctive velvet-like feel, the pile construction is particularly durable, and ideally suited to applications such as public transport. Its uprigh ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Nainsook

    • Nainsook is a soft, fine, lightweight form of muslin. Muslin encompasses a broad range of fabrics of varying weights and fineness, but is always a plain weave, cotton fabric. The word nainsook is first documented in 1790, and derives from the Hindi and Urdu "nainsukh", which literally means "eye's delight". Nainsook w ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National Textile Corporation

    • National Textile Corporation is a company owned by the Indian government. It owns 23 working textile mills which produce yarn and fabric. The company was incorporated in April 1968. NTC had made a turnaround within a short span to emerge as a debt-free company with a highly competitive revival strategy. Apart from re- ... Read »


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    • Needle lace

    • Needle lace (also known as needlelace or needle-made lace or point lace) is a type of lace created using a needle and thread to stitch up hundreds of small stitches to form the lace itself. In its purest form the only equipment and materials used are a needle, thread and scissors. This form of lace making originated i ... Read »


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    • Needlework Development Scheme

    • Needlework Development Scheme (NDS) was a collaborative program between industry and art education, that was to encourage and initiate a new standard for British embroidery design in both hand and machine work. The organisation was primarily responsible for developing collections of foreign and British embroidery, that ... Read »


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    • Ninon

    • Ninon is a sheer fabric of silk, rayon, or nylon made in a variety of tight smooth weaves, open lacy patterns, or open mesh-like appearance. It is described as very delicate or lightweight and is sometimes referred to as "French tergal". Available in a variety of solid colors and tone-on-tone woven vertical stripes. So ... Read »


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    • Noil

    • Noil is the short fiber left over from combing wool or spinning silk and used as a decorative additive for many spinning projects, like rovings and yarns. Silk noil is also called "raw silk", although that is a misnomer. As noil is a relatively short fiber, fabric made from noil is weaker and considered less valuable. ... Read »


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    • Nottingham lace curtain machine

    • The lace curtain machine, is a lace machine that was invented by John Livesey in Nottingham in 1846. It was an adaptation of John Heathcoat's bobbinet machine. It made the miles of curtaining which screened Victorian and later windows. The forerunner of mechanical lace making stems from the 1589 . This is a weavin ... Read »


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    • Oilcloth

    • Oilcloth, also known as enameled cloth or (in England) American cloth, was close-woven cotton duck or linen cloth with a coating of boiled linseed oil to make it waterproof. Historically, pre-Mackintosh, oilcloth was one of very few flexible, waterproof materials that were widely available. Leather was expensive—v ... Read »


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    • Organdy

    • Organdy or organdie is the sheerest and crispest cotton cloth made.Combed yarns contribute to its appearance. Organdy is a balanced plain weave. Because of its stiffness and fiber content, it is very prone to wrinkling. Organza is the filament yarn counterpart to organdy. Its sheerness and crispness are the resul ... Read »


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    • Organza

    • Organza is a thin, plain weave, sheer fabric traditionally made from silk. Many modern organzas are woven with synthetic filament fibers such as polyester or nylon. Silk organza is woven by a number of mills along the Yangtze River and in the province of Zhejiang in China. A coarser silk organza is woven in the Bangalo ... Read »


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    • Osnaburg

    • Osnaburg was a coarse type of plain fabric, named from the archaic English name for the city of Osnabrück, Germany. Osnaburg fabric may have been first imported into English-speaking countries from Osnaburg. Originally made from flax yarns, it has also been made from tow or jute yarns, and from flax or tow warp wit ... Read »


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    • Ottoman (textile)

    • Ottoman is a fabric with a pronounced ribbed or corded effect, often made of silk or a mixture of cotton and other silk like yarns. It is mostly used for formal dress and in particular, legal dress (such as QC gowns) and academic dress (mostly for hoods). Ottoman made of pure silk is very expensive so artificial silk ... Read »


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    • Oxford (cloth)

    • Oxford is a type of woven dress shirt fabric, employed to make a particular casual-to-formal cloth in dress shirts that may be called Oxford shirts. The Oxford weave has a basketweave structure and a lustrous aspect making it a popular fabric for a dress shirt. Varieties in the cloth are the plain Oxford, the Pinpoin ... Read »


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    • Perrotine printing

    • The perrotine is a block-printing machine invented by Perrot of Rouen in 1834, and practically speaking is the only successful mechanical device ever introduced for this purpose. For some reason or other it has rarely been used in England, but its value was almost immediately recognized on the Continent, and although b ... Read »


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    • Pin stripes

    • Pinstripes are a pattern of very thin stripes of any color running in parallel often found in cloth. The pinstriped suit has become associated with conservative business attire, although many designers now produce the fashionable pinstripe patterns for fashion-conscious consumers. Although found mostly in men's suits, ... Read »


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    • Piqué (weaving)


    • Pirn

    • A pirn is a rod onto which weft thread is wound for use in weaving. Unlike a bobbin, it is fixed in place, and the thread is delivered off the end of the pirn rather than from the centre. A typical pirn is made of wood or plastic and is slightly tapered for most of its length, flaring out more sharply at the base, whic ... Read »


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    • Plush

    • Plush (from French peluche) is a textile having a cut nap or pile the same as fustian or velvet. Its softness of feel gave rise to the adjective "plush" to describe something soft or luxurious, which was extended to describe luxury accommodation, or something rich and full. Originally the pile of plush consisted of mo ... Read »


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    • Polyurethane laminate

    • Polyurethane laminate (PUL) is a compound fabric made by laminating a cloth fabric to a thin film of polyurethane. Polyurethane laminated fabrics have a wide range of applications in medical, automotive and garment uses, PUL generally refers to a specific type used by makers of resuable incontinence products and access ... Read »


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    • Pongee

    • Pongee is a soft thin woven cloth. In the early 20th century, pongee was an important export from China to the United States. Pongee is still woven in silk by many mills across China, especially along the banks of the Yangtze at mills in Sichuan, Anhui, Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces. Generally it varies in weight from ... Read »


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    • Poplin

    • Poplin, also called tabinet (or tabbinet), is a strong fabric in a plain weave of any fiber or blend, with crosswise ribs that typically gives a corded surface. Poplin traditionally consisted of a silk warp with a weft of worsted yarn. In this case, as the weft is in the form of a stout cord the fabric has a ridged st ... Read »


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    • Pot-holder

    • A pot-holder is a piece of textile (often quilted) or silicone used to cover the hand when holding hot kitchen cooking equipment, like pots and pans. They are frequently made of polyester and/or cotton. Crocheted pot-holders can be made out of cotton yarn as a craft project/folk art. A pot-holder offers protection for ... Read »


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    • Prelle

    • Prelle is a family-owned silk textile mill in operation since 1752, the oldest silk mill in Lyon, France. Curators, collectors and interior designers worldwide use their fabrics. The company still has the capability of weaving by hand using century old wooden looms to recreate 18th- and 19th-century-style brochés (a ... Read »


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    • The Quilts of Gee's Bend


    • Rakematiz

    • Rakematiz is a thick silk fabric embroidered with strands of gold. It was extremely rare and valuable. Apparel that incorporated rakematiz was popular in Europe in the Middle Ages. Some scholars have suggested the term rakematiz comes from the Italian word ricamata, which means embroidery. ... Read »


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    • Rep (fabric)

    • Rep, Rip, Repp, or Reps is a cloth woven in fine cords or ribs across the width of a piece, usually made of silk, wool, or cotton. The name is said to have been adapted from the French reps, a word of unknown origin; it has also been suggested that it is a corruption of rib. In silk it is used for dresses, neckties, an ... Read »


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    • Rickrack

    • Rickrack (sometimes spelled ricrac) is a "flat narrow braid woven in zigzag form, used as a trimming for clothing or curtains." Before the prevalence of sewing machines and sergers, rickrack was used to provide a finished edge to fabric. Made of cotton or polyester, rickrack is stitched or glued to the edges of an it ... Read »


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    • Rinzu

    • Rinzu (綸子?) is a Japanese silk satin damask. It was the preferred fabric for kimonos in the Edo period. ... Read »


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    • Rit

    • Rochester Institute of Technology

      NCAA Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) is a private doctoral university within the town of Henrietta in the Rochester, New York metropolitan area. RIT is composed of nine academic colleges, including National Technical Institute for the Deaf. The Institute is one of only a small number of engineering institutes ... Read »


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    • Russell cord

    • Russell cord is a finely corded fabric, generally constructed with a cotton warp and worsted weft (filling). Two or more warp threads are woven together to form the cord, thus the cord lines run warp-wise. Russell cord is visually similar to a very narrow-waled corduroy called pincord, but it is heavier and more sturdy ... Read »


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    • Sateen

    • Sateen is a fabric made using a satin weave structure but made with spun yarns instead of filament. The sheen and softer feel of sateen is produced through the satin weave structure. Warp yarns are floated over weft yarns, for example four over and one under. (In a weft-faced satin or sateen, the weft yarns are floate ... Read »


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    • Satinet

    • Satinet is a finely woven fabric with a finish resembling satin, but made partly or wholly from cotton or synthetic fiber. The process developed in Mesopotamia around 5000BC. The fibers may be natural (as with cotton, woolens or cashmere wool) or synthetic. The process of manufacturing satinets in the U.S. began c. 18 ... Read »


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    • Saye

    • Saye is a woollen cloth woven in the west and south of England in and around the 15th and 16th centuries. A suburb of Bristol, England is called Sea Mills, this was originally Saye Mills. Samuel Pepys on June 21, 1661, recorded purchasing "green Say ... for curtains in my parler". A related sort of cloth was [1] ser ... Read »


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    • Sendal

    • Sendal, cendal or sandal is a thin and light silk material, chiefly used to make ceremonial clothing, church vestments, and banners. The word derives from Greek σινδων (sindōn), "fine linen"; the old French word is cendal. ... Read »


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    • Serge (fabric)

    • Serge is a type of twill fabric that has diagonal lines or ridges on both sides, made with a two-up, two-down weave. The worsted variety is used in making military uniforms, suits, great coats and trench coats. Its counterpart, silk serge, is used for linings. French serge is a softer, finer variety. The word is also u ... Read »


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    • Shag (fabric)

    • A shag is a rug or carpet that has a deep pile, giving it a shaggy appearance. The name derives from Old English sceacga, related to Old Norse skegg, beard. In recent years, shag carpeting has seen a resurgence of popularity. ... Read »


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    • Shantung (fabric)

    • Shantung is a type of silk fabric historically from the province of Shandong. It is similar to Dupioni, but is slightly thinner and less irregular. Shantung is often used for bridal gowns. ... Read »


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    • Shearling

    • Shearling is a skin from a recently sheared sheep or lamb that has been tanned and dressed with the wool left on. It has a suede surface on one side and a clipped fur surface on the other. Usually the suede side is worn outward. Shearling can be made from real sheepskin or from synthetic fibers. Real shearling breathes ... Read »


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    • Shrinkage (fabric)

    • Shrinkage is the process in which a fabric becomes smaller than its original size, usually through the process of laundry. Novice users of modern laundry machines sometimes experience accidental shrinkage of garments, especially when applying heat. Others may intentionally shrink a garment to their size. Some may purch ... Read »


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    • Silnylon

    • Silnylon, a portmanteau of "silicone" and "nylon", is a synthetic fabric used mainly in lightweight outdoor gear. It is made by impregnating a thin woven nylon fabric with liquid silicone from both sides. This makes it strong for its weight, as the silicone substantially improves the tear strength. It is also highly wa ... Read »


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    • Snag (textiles)

    • In textiles, a snag is created when a sharp or rough object pulls, plucks, scratches, or drags a group of fibres, yarn, or a yarn segment from its normal pattern. Snags can be classified into three types: Objects that often cause snags are rough fingernails or toenails, or hangnails. When a snag occurs in certain fin ... Read »


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    • Spectra Shield

    • Spectra Shield is a composite material (specifically, an ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber) used in bulletproof vests and vehicle armour. It is manufactured by Honeywell. Other popular fibers with similar uses are aramid (Kevlar or Twaron) and Dyneema (another UHMWPE). ... Read »


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    • Spool knitting

    • Spool knitting, corking, French knitting or tomboy knitting is a form of knitting that uses a spool and a number of nails to produce a narrow tube of fabric, similar to i-cord. Spool knitting is a traditional way to teach children the basic principles of knitting. Spool knitters typically have four or five pegs (or br ... Read »


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    • Staple (textiles)

    • Staple refers to fibre of discrete length and may be of any composition. A continuous fibre such as natural silk or synthetic is known as filament rather than staple fibre. Of uncertain origin but possibly a back-formation arising because part of the business of a wool-stapler was to sort and class the wool accord ... Read »


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    • Stasilon

    • Stasilon is a brand-name hemostatic woven textile manufactured by Entegrion, Inc. of Durham, North Carolina, USA. It is made from fibers of continuous filament fiberglass and bamboo yarn and used to accelerate clotting and stop bleeding from cuts and abrasions. Originally intended for military use, NATO and United Stat ... Read »


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    • Steam cleaning

    • Steam cleaning involves using steam for cleaning. Its uses include domestic applications in cleaning flooring and household dirt removal, and industrial uses in removing grease and dirt from engines. In ovens, steam cleaning is a safe alternative to self cleaning because with water it uses safer, lower temperatures th ... Read »


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    • Stomatex

    • Stomatex® is a high performance patented fabric which is inspired by the physics of transpiring plant leaves and invented by Nigel Middleton. Stomatex is generally made from the closed-cell foam neoprene which is a synthetic rubber in a pattern of dome-shaped chambers each with a tiny pore within the centre. ... Read »


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    • Synthetic fabric

    • Synthetic fabrics are textiles made from man-made rather than natural fibers. Examples of synthetic fabrics include polyester, acrylic, nylon, rayon, acetate, spandex, latex, Orlon and Kevlar. Synthetic (chemically produced) fabrics are made by joining monomers into polymers, through a process called polymerization. ... Read »


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    • Teased wool

    • Teased wool is the stage of wool fiber in preparation for spinning, after it is teased out, prior to carding. Teased wool is loosened and spread out, has most of the dirt removed, and is no longer lumpy. ... Read »


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    • Terrycloth

    • Terrycloth, terry cloth, terry towelling, terry, or simply towelling is a fabric with loops that can absorb large amounts of water. It can be manufactured by weaving or knitting. Towelling is woven on special looms that have two beams of longitudinal warp through which the filler or weft is fired laterally. The first i ... Read »


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    • Textile History

    • Textile History  

      Textile History is a peer-reviewed academic journal first published in 1968 and published by Maney Publishing on behalf of the Pasold Research Fund. It covers "aspects of the cultural and social history of apparel and textiles, as well as issues arising from the exhibition, preservation and interpretation of historic t ... Read »


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    • Textile sample

    • A textile sample is a piece of cloth or fabric designed to represent a larger whole. A small sample, usually taken from existing fabric, is often called a swatch, whilst a larger sample, made as a trial to test production methods, is called a strike off. The use of swatches is an essential part of the design process ... Read »


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    • Textile-reinforced concrete

    • Textile-reinforced concrete is a type of reinforced concrete in which the usual steel reinforcing bars are replaced by textile materials. Instead of using a metal cage inside the concrete, this technique uses a fabric cage inside the same. Materials with high tensile strengths with negligible elongation properties ... Read »


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    • Texturizing

    • Texturising is the process by which synthetic fibres are modified to change their texture - the physical appearance of the fibre. Texturising techniques can include bulking (where thermoplastic fibres are twisted, heat set and untwisted), crimping and coiling, amongst others. Texturising takes advantage of the thermopl ... Read »


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    • Thor Shield

    • Thor Shield is a patented fabric that purports to protect the wearer from Tasers or other electroshock weapons. It consists of a polyester fabric, which is bonded to a conductive material that loops electricity from such weapons back to the source. The conductive layer completes the circuit without involving the body o ... Read »


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    • Toyo straw

    • Toyo straw is a type of shiny smooth straw made chiefly in Japan with shellacked rice paper. This material is commonly used for straw hats and fedoras. ... Read »


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    • Tucuyo


    • Tulle (netting)

    • Tulle (English: /tuːl/ TOOL) is a lightweight, very fine netting, which is often starched. It can be made of various fibres, including silk, nylon, and rayon. Tulle is most commonly used for veils, gowns (particularly wedding gowns), and ballet tutus. Tulle comes in a wide array of colors and it can also easily be d ... Read »


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    • Twine

    • Twine is a light string or strong thread composed of two or more smaller strands or yarns twisted, and then twisted together. More generally, the term can be applied to a cord. Natural fibres used for making twine include cotton, sisal, jute, hemp, henequen, and coir. A variety of synthetic fibres are also used. ... Read »


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    • Variegated yarn

    • Variegated yarn is yarn dyed with more than one colour. It can produce effects that vary depending on the technique of the crafter, the pattern used, and the frequency of colour change. These effects include "flashing" (lightning-bolt effects) and "pooling" (patchy or marbleized effects). Some yarns (known as "self-str ... Read »


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    • Vegetable flannel

    • Vegetable flannel is a type of flannel using fibres from the Scots pine, or pinus sylvestris, rather than traditional woollen fibres. It is described as having a hemp like appearance, but with a tighter, softer texture. In addition to this, the term can also describe coarse linen used for underclothing. Invented in th ... Read »


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    • Velour

    • Velour or velours is a plush, knitted fabric or textile similar to velvet. It is usually made from cotton but can also be made from synthetic materials such as polyester. Velour is used in a wide variety of applications, including clothing and upholstery. Other examples include car seats and leotards. Velour can also ... Read »


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    • Velveteen

    • Velveteen (or velveret) is a cloth made in imitation of velvet. Normally cotton, the term is sometimes applied to a mixture of silk and cotton. Some velveteens are a kind of fustian, having a rib of velvet pile alternating with a plain depression. This fabric has a pile that is short (never more than 3 mm deep) and ... Read »


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    • Voile

    • Voile is a soft, sheer fabric, usually made of 100% cotton or cotton blends including linen or polyester. The term comes from French, and means veil. Because of its light weight, the fabric is mostly used in soft furnishing. In hot countries, voile is used as window treatments and mosquito nets. When used as curtain ma ... Read »


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    • Wadmal

    • Wadmal (Old Norse: vaðmál; Norwegian: vadmÃ¥l, "cloth measure") is a coarse, dense, usually undyed wool fabric woven in Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Greenland, and the Orkney, Faroe and Shetland Islands from the Middle Ages into the 18th century. Wadmal was woven on the warp-weighted loom used throughout these area ... Read »


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    • Waffle fabric

    • Waffle, or sometimes honeycomb fabric is fabric, usually cotton or microfibre, woven in a way which makes it very absorbent. The waffle weave also allows air to flow through the towel so that it dries quickly. Waffle fabrics are made in a range of weights. Waffle fabric is used for cleaning surfaces in industry. The s ... Read »


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    • Warp and woof

    • In weaving, the weft (sometimes woof) is the thread or yarn which is drawn through, inserted over-and-under, the lengthwise warp yarns that are held in tension on a frame or loom to create cloth. Warp is the lengthwise or longitudinal thread in a roll, while weft is the transverse thread. A single thread of the weft, c ... Read »


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    • Warp printing

    • Warp printing is a fabric production method which combines textile printing and weaving to create a distinctively patterned fabric, usually in silk. The warp threads of the fabric are printed before weaving to create a softly blurred, vague pastel-coloured pattern. It was particularly fashionable in the eighteenth cent ... Read »


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    • Whipcord

    • Whipcord is the name for either a fabric or a form of braided cord. The fabric whipcord is a strong worsted or cotton fabric made of hard-twisted yarns with a diagonal cord or rib. The weave used for whipcord is a steep-angled twill, essentially the same weave as a cavalry twill or a steep gabardine. However, the ... Read »


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    • Wigan (fabric)

    • Wigan is a cotton material coated with latex rubber. Its name has been derived from Wigan, the name of a town in Greater Manchester, England. ... Read »


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    • Willy (textile machine)

    • A willy or twilly is a machine used in the textile industry, comprising a hollow cone or cylinder with internal spikes which revolves, opening and cleaning wool, cotton, or flax. Terms used have included wool-mill, willow (especially for cotton), willey, twilley, and devil. The process has been called willowing, willyi ... Read »


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    • Windstopper

    • Windstopper is a fabric laminate made by W. L. Gore & Associates. It is similar to Gore-Tex, except that it is only windproof and breathable, not waterproof. One of the most common applications is a lamination with Polar fleece, since the lack of wind resistance is one of the principal drawbacks of that fabric. Windst ... Read »


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    • Wool top

    • Topmaking mills make wool top, a semi-processed product from raw wool. The process requires that the wool be scoured (washed) and combed and sorted. The longer fibers resulting from the process are called tops, and are in a form ready for spinning. To be closer to customers, much of the industry has moved from Australi ... Read »


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    • Wrap reel

    • A wrap reel or skein winder is a device for measuring yarn and making it into hanks of a standard size.. The reel is of a standard size and its revolutions are counted as the yarn is wrapped around it. Typically, a set number of revolutions will be used so that the hank is of a standard size — a skein or lea. For ... Read »


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    • Zephyr cloth

    • Zephyr cloth is a thin kind of made in Belgium. The term also refers to a waterproof fabric of wool. ... Read »


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    • Zibeline

    • Zibeline (/ˈzɪbəlɪn/ or /ˈzɪbəlaɪn/) is a thick, soft fabric with a long nap. It is usually made of wool, such as mohair or alpaca, but can also be made from the hair of other animals, such as camels. Zibeline can also refer to either the sable (Martes zibellina) or its pelt, which zibeline was ... Read »


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