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    Textile patterns

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Textile patterns

    • Tartans

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Tartans


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    • Adinkra symbols

    • Adinkra are visual symbols, made by builders in Egypt, that represent concepts or aphorisms. Adinkra are used extensively in fabrics and pottery. They are incorporated into walls and other architectural features. Fabric adinkra are often made by woodcut sign writing as well as screen printing. Adinkra symbols appear on ... Read »


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    • Argyle (pattern)

    • An argyle (occasionally argyll) pattern is made of diamonds or lozenges. The word is sometimes used to refer to an individual diamond in the design, but more commonly refers to the overall pattern. Most argyle contains layers of overlapping motifs, adding a sense of three-dimensionality, movement, and texture. Typicall ... Read »


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    • Border tartan

    • Border tartan, sometimes known as Northumbrian tartan, Shepherds' Plaid or Border Drab, or Border check is a design used in woven fabrics historically associated with the Anglo-Scottish Border, including the Scottish Borders and Northumbria. Possibly the most identifiable Border tartan garment of the region is the maud ... Read »


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    • Check (pattern)

    • A check (also checker, Brit: chequer) is a pattern of modified stripes consisting of crossed horizontal and vertical lines forming squares. The word is derived from the ancient Persian language word shah, meaning "king", from the oriental game of chess, played on a squared board, particularly from the expression s ... Read »


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    • Dotted Swiss (fabric)

    • Dotted Swiss, also known as Swiss Dot, is a sheer cotton fabric that is embellished with small dots. The dots can be applied in a number of different ways and colors, and is used for baby clothes, wedding dresses and curtains. The design is said to have originated around 1750 in St. Gallen, Switzerland, which emerged ... Read »


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    • End-on-end

    • End-on-end (also fil-à-fil) is a type of closely woven, plain weave cloth created by the alternation of light and dark warp and weft threads, resulting in a heathered effect. The English term comes from the French "fil-à-fil", literally "thread-to-thread". It is most commonly woven from cotton or linen fibers. En ... Read »


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    • Gingham

    • Gingham is a medium-weight balanced plain-woven fabric made from dyed cotton or cotton-blend yarn. It is made of carded, medium or fine yarns, where the colouring is on the warp yarns and always along the grain (weft). Gingham has no right or wrong side with respect to color. The name may originate from the Malay ... Read »


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    • Glen plaid

    • Glen plaid (short for Glen Urquhart plaid) or Glenurquhart check is a woollen fabric with a woven twill design of small and large checks. It is usually made of black/grey and white, or with more muted colours, particularly with two dark and two light stripes alternate with four dark and four light stripes which creates ... Read »


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    • Grenfell Cloth

    • Grenfell Cloth is a densely-woven cotton gabardine material used to make luxury and outdoor clothing since its creation in 1923. It was named after Sir Wilfred Grenfell, a British medical missionary working extensively in Newfoundland. He required a cloth to be woven to protect himself from the snow, wind, wet and cold ... Read »


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    • Gul (design)

    • A gul (also written gol, göl and gül) is a medallion-like design element typical of traditional hand-woven carpets from Central and West Asia. In Turkmen weavings they are often repeated to form the pattern in the main field. Guls are medallions, often octagonal, and often somewhat angular on a generally oct ... Read »


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    • Harlequin print

    • Harlequin print is a repeating pattern of contrasting diamonds or elongated squares standing on end. A harlequin is character from Commedia dell'arte, a 16th-century Italian theater movement. Harlequins were witty, mischievous clowns. Their early costumes were sewn together from fabric scraps. Over time, the diamo ... Read »


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    • Harris Tweed

    • Harris Tweed is a cloth handwoven by islanders at their homes in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, finished in the Outer Hebrides, and made from pure virgin wool dyed and spun in the Outer Hebrides. This definition, quality standards and protection of the Harris Tweed name are enshrined in the Harris Tweed Act 1993. ... Read »


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    • Herringbone (cloth)

    • Herringbone, also called Broken Twill Weave describes a distinctive V-shaped weaving pattern usually found in twill fabric. It is distinguished from a plain chevron by the break at reversal, which makes it resemble a broken zigzag. The pattern is called herringbone because it resembles the skeleton of a herring fish. H ... Read »


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    • Houndstooth

    • Houndstooth, hounds tooth check or hound's tooth (and similar spellings), also known as dogstooth, dogtooth, dog's tooth, or pied-de-poule, is a duotone textile pattern characterized by broken checks or abstract four-pointed shapes, often in black and white, although other colours are used. The classic houndstooth patt ... Read »


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    • Ikat

    • Ikat, or ikkat, is a dyeing technique used to pattern textiles that employs resist dyeing on the yarns prior to dyeing and weaving the fabric. In ikat the resist is formed by binding individual yarns or bundles of yarns with a tight wrapping applied in the desired pattern. The yarns are then dyed. The bindings may the ... Read »


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    • Ise-katagami

    • Katagami (型紙) or Ise-katagami (伊勢型紙?) is the Japanese craft of making paper stencils for dyeing textiles. It is designated one of the Important Intangible Cultural Properties of Japan. The art is traditionally centered on the city of Suzuka in Mie Prefecture. This is good for making a cert ... Read »


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    • Paisley (design)

    • Paisley or Paisley pattern is a term in English for a design using the buta or boteh, a droplet-shaped vegetable motif of Persian origin. Such designs became very popular in the West in the 18th and 19th centuries, following imports of post-Mughal versions of the design from India, especially in the form of Kashmir sha ... Read »


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    • Pin stripes

    • Pinstripes are a pattern of very thin stripes of any color running in parallel often found in cloth. The pinstriped suit has become associated with conservative business attire, although many designers now produce the fashionable pinstripe patterns for fashion-conscious consumers. Although found mostly in men's suits, ... Read »


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    • Rain pattern

    • Rain pattern is a family of military camouflage patterns used by Warsaw Pact countries such as Poland, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, and Bulgaria. They are characterised by the presence of many closely spaced vertical streaks resembling falling rain, printed over a background which is often of a single colour, but may ... Read »


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    • Strawberry Thief (William Morris)

    • Strawberry Thief is one of William Morris's most popular repeating designs for textiles. It takes as its subject the thrushes that Morris found stealing fruit in his kitchen garden of his countryside home, Kelmscott Manor, in Oxfordshire. To print the pattern Morris used the ancient and painstaking indigo-discharge met ... Read »


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    • Tartan

    • Tartan (Scottish Gaelic: breacan [ˈbɾʲɛxkən]) is a pattern consisting of criss-crossed horizontal and vertical bands in multiple colours. Tartans originated in woven wool, but now they are made in many other materials. Tartan is particularly associated with Scotland. Scottish kilts almost always have tar ... Read »


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    • Tattersall (cloth)

    • Tattersall describes a check or plaid pattern woven into cloth. The pattern is composed of regularly-spaced thin, even vertical warp stripes, repeated horizontally in the weft, thereby forming squares. The stripes are usually in two alternating colours, generally darker on a light ground. The cloth pattern takes its n ... Read »


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    • Toile

    • Toile is a fabric, from the French word meaning "linen cloth" or "canvas", particularly cloth or canvas for painting on. The word "toile" can refer to the fabric itself, a test garment (generally) sewn from the same material, or a type of repeated surface decoration (traditionally) printed on the same fabric. The term ... Read »


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