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    Shipbuilding

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    • Ships by country of construction

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    • Boat building

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    • Businesspeople in shipbuilding

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    • Drydocks

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    • Lists of ship commissionings

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    • Lists of ship decommissionings

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    • Lists of ship launches

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    • Ship measurements

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    • Proposed ships

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    • Shipbuilders

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    • Shipbuilding in London

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    • Shipbuilding in Washington (state)

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    • Shipbuilding stubs

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    • Shipbuilding trade unions

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    • Ships by shipbuilding company

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    • Shipyards

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    • Hodgdon Yachts

    • Hodgdon Yachts

      Hodgdon Yachts (incorporated as Hodgdon Shipbuilding, LLC and previously known as "Hodgdon Brothers" yard ) is a builder of yachts and specialized military vessels, based in East Boothbay, Maine. It is a family-run business that was founded in 1816—reputedly the oldest continuously operating family boatbuilder in ... Read »


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    • Shipbuilding

    • Shipbuilding is the construction of ships and other floating vessels. It normally takes place in a specialized facility known as a shipyard. Shipbuilders, also called shipwrights, follow a specialized occupation that traces its roots to before recorded history. Shipbuilding and ship repairs, both commercial and milita ... Read »


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    • A1 (shipping)

    • In shipping, the designation A1 is a symbol used to denote quality of construction and material. In the various shipping registers ships are classed and given a rating after an official examination, and assigned a classification mark, which appears in addition to other particulars in those shipping registers after the ... Read »


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    • ABS Steels

    • ABS Steels are types of structural steel which are standardized by the American Bureau of Shipping for use in shipbuilding. ABS steels come many grades in ordinary-strength and two levels of higher-strength specifications. All of these steels have been engineered to be optimal long-lived shipbuilding steels. ABS doe ... Read »


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    • Abydos boats

    • The Abydos boats were discovered in October 2000. Initially, they appeared to be a white, ‘ghostly’ fleet of 14 boat images in the desert sand. They are not the oldest boat remains to be discovered in Egypt as is sometimes proclaimed, but they have proved to be important to the history of Egyptian boat design ... Read »


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    • Aka (sailing)

    • The aka of a multihull sailboat is a member of the framework that connects the hull to the ama(s) (outrigger). The term aka originated with the proa, but is also applied to modern trimarans. The design of the aka depends on the forces it will encounter when sailing. For example, there are two modern variations of the ... Read »


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    • Anchor handling tug supply vessel

    • Anchor Handling Tug Supply (AHTS) vessels are mainly built to handle anchors for oil rigs, tow them to location, anchor them up and, in a few cases, serve as an Emergency Response and Rescue Vessel (ERRV). They are also used to transport supplies to and from offshore drilling rigs. Many of these vessels are designed t ... Read »


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    • Ancient shipbuilding techniques

    • Ship construction techniques can be categorized as one of hide, log, sewn, lashed-plank, clinker (and reverse-clinker), shell-first, and frame-first. While the frame-first technique dominates the modern ship construction industry, the ancients relied primarily on the other techniques to build their watercraft. In many ... Read »


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    • Anti-fouling paint

    • Anti-fouling paint - a category of commercially available underwater hull paints (also known as bottom paints) - is a specialized category of coatings applied as the outer (outboard) layer to the hull of a ship or boat, to slow the growth and/or facilitate detachment of subaquatic organisms that attach to the hull and ... Read »


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    • Ballast pond

    • A ballast pond was a construction found in shipyards during the age of sail. The feature was often a prominent part of the large dockyards of the Royal Navy, where large numbers of warships would be laid up 'in ordinary' during periods of peace, when the navy retained only some of its ships in active commission. Ships ... Read »


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    • Boom vang

    • A boom vang (US) or kicking strap (UK) is a line or piston system on a sailboat used to exert downward force on the boom and thus control the shape of the sail. The Collins English Dictionary defines it as "A rope or tackle extended from the boom of a fore-and-aft mainsail to a deck fitting of a vessel when running, in ... Read »


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    • Bridge wing

    • A bridge wing is a narrow walkway extending outward from both sides of a pilothouse to the full width of a ship or slightly beyond, to allow bridge personnel a full view to aid in the maneuvering of the ship. Officers use bridge wings when docking or maneuvering in locks and narrow waterways. Many of them are now equip ... Read »


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    • Bulkhead (barrier)

    • A bulkhead is a retaining wall, such as a bulkhead within a ship or a watershed retaining wall. It may also be used in mines to contain flooding. Coastal bulkheads are most often referred to as seawalls, bulkheading, or riprap revetments. These manmade structures are constructed along shorelines with the purpose of co ... Read »


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    • Bulkhead (partition)

    • A bulkhead is an upright wall within the hull of a ship or within the fuselage of an aeroplane. Other kinds of partition elements within a ship are decks and deckheads. The word bulki meant "cargo" in Old Norse. Sometime in the 15th century sailors and builders in Europe realized that walls within a vessel would p ... Read »


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    • Carling (sailing)

    • In shipbuilding, carlings are two pieces of timber laid fore and aft under the deck of a ship, from one beam to another, directly over the keel. They serve as a foundation for the whole body of the ship; on these the ledges rest, whereon the planks of the deck, and other structures are fastened. The ends of the curling ... Read »


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    • Carvel (boat building)

    • Carvel built or carvel planking is a method of boat building where hull planks are fastened edge to edge, gaining support from the frame and forming a smooth surface. In contrast with clinker built hulls, where planked edges overlap, carvel construction gives a stronger hull, capable of taking a variety of full-rigged ... Read »


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    • Catamaran

    • A catamaran (/ˌkætəməˈræn/) (informally, a "cat") is a multi-hulled watercraft featuring two parallel hulls of equal size. It is a geometry-stabilized craft, deriving its stability from its wide beam, rather than from a ballasted keel as with a monohull sailboat. Being ballast-free and therefore light ... Read »


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    • Cathedral hull

    • A cathedral hull is a hull shape used in modern boats, usually power-driven. It can be thought of as a kind of vestigial trimaran in which the center hull has two smaller side hulls which are so close to the main hull that there is no longer any open space. A cathedral hull is a vee-bottomed boat with sponsons which ex ... Read »


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    • Circular arc hull

    • The circular arc hull is a design for boat hulls created by Swedish engineer Fredrik Ljungström. In the 1930s and 1940s Ljungström designed and built sailboats, commonly called the Ljungström sailboat. The frames, or ribs, of a circular arc hull all have the same radius. On Fredrik Ljungström's first m ... Read »


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    • Clinker (boat building)

    • Clinker built (also known as lapstrake) is a method of boat building where the edges of hull planks overlap, called a "land" or "landing." In craft of any size planks are also joined end to end into a strake. The technique developed in northern Europe and was successfully used by the Norsemen and typical for the Hansea ... Read »


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    • Coin ceremony

    • The Coin Ceremony is an event which takes place at the keel laying, in the early stages of a ship's construction. In it, the shipbuilders place one or two coins under the keelblock of the new ship to bless the ship and as a symbol of good fortune. The coins are not normally fixed in place and are often retrieved when t ... Read »


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    • Colonial shipbuilding

    • Between America’s vast natural resources, excellent location in relation to the world market, capital flow and plentiful skilled labor; the American colonies had a comparative advantage in shipbuilding. The American colonies also had other incentives to improve their shipbuilding process and produce more ships tha ... Read »


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    • Compartment (ship)

    • A compartment is a portion of the space within a ship defined vertically between decks and horizontally between bulkheads. It is analogous to a room within a building, and may provide watertight subdivision of the ship's hull important in retaining buoyancy if the hull is damaged. Subdivision of a ship's hull into wate ... Read »


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    • Compensated gross tonnage

    • Compensated Gross Tonnage (CGT) is an indicator of the amount of work that is necessary to build a given ship and is calculated by multiplying the tonnage of a ship by a coefficient, which is determined according to type and size of a particular ship. The standard CGT system was developed in 1977 by the OECD so that i ... Read »


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    • Composite ship

    • The technique of composite ship construction (wooden planking over a wrought iron frame) emerged in the mid-19th century as the final stage in the evolution of fast commercial sailing ships. Construction of wrought iron hulled vessels had begun in the 1820s and was a mature technology by the time of the launch of the ... Read »


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    • Consuta

    • Consuta was a revolutionary form of construction of watertight hulls for boats and marine aircraft, comprising four veneers of mahogany planking interleaved with waterproofed calico and stitched together with copper wire. The technique was patented by Sam Saunders of Goring-on-Thames and was first used on the 1898 ump ... Read »


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    • Copper sheathing

    • Copper sheathing is the practice of protecting the under-water hull of a ship or boat from the corrosive effects of salt water and biofouling through the use of copper plates affixed to the outside of the hull. It was pioneered and developed by the Royal Navy during the 18th century. Deterioration of the hull of a ... Read »


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    • Corrosion in ballast tanks

    • Corrosion in Ballast Tanks is the deterioration process where the surface of a ballast tank progresses from microblistering, to electroendosmotic blistering, and finally to cracking of the tank steel itself. Throughout the years the merchant fleet has become increasingly aware of the importance of avoiding corrosion i ... Read »


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    • Coulombi Egg Tanker

    • The Coulombi Egg Tanker is a design that is aimed at reducing oil spills. It was approved by IMO as an alternative to the double hull concept. The United States Coast Guard does not allow this design to enter US waters, effectively preventing it from being built. The design is an enhanced Mid-Deck Tanker and consi ... Read »


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    • Crow's nest


    • Daniel Brocklebank (shipbuilder)

    • Daniel Brocklebank (1741-1801) was a shipbuilder, first in North America and then in Whitehaven, and a mariner in between. He was born in 1741 (or 1742) at Torpenhow, England. At age 14 he moved to Whitehaven to take up an apprenticeship as a carpenter for a shipbuilder. In 1770, Brocklebank established a shipyard at ... Read »


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    • DC distribution system

    • The DC distribution system has been proposed, as a replacement for the present AC power distribution system for ships with electric propulsion. This concept represents a new way of distributing energy for low-voltage installations on ships. It can be used for any electrical ship application up to 20 megawatts and oper ... Read »


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    • Deadweight tonnage

    • Deadweight tonnage (also known as deadweight; abbreviated to DWT, D.W.T., d.w.t., or dwt) or tons deadweight (TDW) is a measure of how much mass a ship is carrying or can safely carry; it does not include the weight of the ship. DWT is the sum of the weights of cargo, fuel, fresh water, ballast water, provisions, passe ... Read »


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    • Deadwood (shipbuilding)

    • Deadwood is the lower part of a ship's stem or stern. ... Read »


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    • Displacement (ship)

    • The displacement or displacement tonnage of a ship is the ship's weight. The name reflects the fact that it is measured indirectly, by first calculating the volume of water displaced by the ship, and then calculating the weight of that water. By Archimedes' principle, this is also the weight of the ship. Displacement ... Read »


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    • Dorade box

    • A dorade box (also called a dorade vent, collector box, Charlie Noble or simply a "ventilator") is a type of vent that permits the passage of air in and out of the cabin or engine room of a boat while keeping rain, spray, and sea wash out. The basic form is a low, rectangular box fixed to the deck or cabin top, fitted ... Read »


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    • Double bottom

    • A double bottom is a ship hull design and construction method where the bottom of the ship has two complete layers of watertight hull surface: one outer layer forming the normal hull of the ship, and a second inner hull which is somewhat higher in the ship, perhaps a few feet, which forms a redundant barrier to seawate ... Read »


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    • Double hull

    • A double hull is a ship hull design and construction method where the bottom and sides of the ship have two complete layers of watertight hull surface: one outer layer forming the normal hull of the ship, and a second inner hull which is some distance inboard, typically by a few feet, which forms a redundant barrier to ... Read »


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    • Double-hulled tanker

    • A double-hulled tanker refers to an oil tanker which has a double hull. They reduce the likelihood of leaks occurring than in single-hulled tankers, and their ability to prevent or reduce oil spills led to double hulls being standardized for oil tankers and other types of ships including by the International Convention ... Read »


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    • Emerson Cavitation Tunnel

    • The Emerson Cavitation Tunnel is a propeller testing facility based that is part of the School of Engineering at Newcastle University. It is currently the third largest cavitation tunnel in the UK, after those owned by the Ministry of Defence at Haslar, and the University of Liverpool's School of Engineering, respectiv ... Read »


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    • Faculty of Shipbuilding, Technical University of Varna

    • Motto "From opportunity to reality" ("A posse ad esse") Type Public Established 1962 Rector Prof. Rosen Vasilev, PhD Students ~7500 Location Varna, Bulgaria C" >
    • Technical University of Varna

      Coordinates: 43°13′26″N 27°56′10″E / 43.22389°N 27.93611°E / 43.22389; 27.93611 The Technical University of Varna (Bulgarian: Технически университет – Варна, often abbreviated as ТР... Read »


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    • False keel

    • The false keel was a timber, forming part of the hull of a wooden sailing ship. Typically 6 inches thick for a 74-gun ship in the 19th century, the false keel was constructed in several pieces, which were scarphed together, and attached to the underside of the keel by iron staples. The false keel was intended to pro ... Read »


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    • Finnish-Swedish ice class

    • Finnish-Swedish ice class is an ice class assigned to a vessel operating in first-year ice in the Baltic Sea and calling Finnish or Swedish ports. Ships are divided into six ice classes based on requirements for hull structural design, engine output and performance in ice according to the regulations issued by the Finn ... Read »


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    • Fitting-out

    • Fitting-out, or "outfitting”, is the process in shipbuilding that follows the float-out of a vessel and precedes sea trials. It is the period when all the remaining construction of the ship is completed and readied for delivery to her owners. Since most of the fitting-out process is interior work, this stage can o ... Read »


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    • Flat spline

    • A spline, or the more modern term flexible curve, consists of a long strip fixed in position at a number of points that relaxes to form and hold a smooth curve passing through those points for the purpose of transferring that curve to another material. Before computers were used for creating engineering designs, draft ... Read »


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    • Float-out

    • Float-out is the process in modern shipbuilding that follows the keel laying and precedes the fitting-out process. It is analogous to launching a ship, a specific process that has largely been discontinued in modern shipbuilding. Both floating-out and launching are the times when the ship leaves dry land and becomes wa ... Read »


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    • Flush deck

    • Flush deck is a term in naval architecture. It can refer to any deck of a ship which is continuous from stem to stern. It has two specific common referents: "Flush deck" with "flush" in its generic meaning of "even or level; forming an unbroken plane", is sometimes applied to vessels, as in describing yachts lacking a ... Read »


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    • Fondo Egone Missio Archives

    • The Fondo Egone Missio (Egone Missio Archives) contains thousands of documents and photographs 1909-1967 relevant to the design and construction of passenger ships, from the original drawings of Monfalcone yard no. 1 (the steamship Trieste of 1909) to all the reference papers of the design and construction of Home Line ... Read »


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    • Forecastle

    • Forecastle (pron. fowk-sul; commonly abbreviated "fo'c's'le") refers to the upper deck of a sailing ship forward of the foremast, or the forward part of a ship with the sailors' living quarters. Related to the latter meaning is the phrase "" which denotes anything related to ordinary sailors, as opposed to a ship's off ... Read »


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    • Froude–Krylov force


    • Furring

    • In construction, furring (furring strips) are thin strips of wood or other material to level or raise surfaces of another material to prevent dampness, to make space for insulation, or to level and resurface ceilings or walls. Furring refers to the process of installing the strips and to the strips themselves. "Firring ... Read »


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    • Gaff vang

    • A gaff vang is a line on a gaff rig sailboat used to exert lateral force on the gaff and thus control the shape of the sail. Rarely used now they are commonly shown on old pictures and drawings. Typically separate port and starboard vangs were fitted. The primary purpose of the gaff vang is to reduce the twist in the s ... Read »


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    • Gangway (nautical)

    • A gangway is a narrow passage that joins the quarterdeck to the forecastle of a sailing ship. The term is also extended to mean the narrow passages used to board or disembark ships. Modern shipping uses gangways to embark and disembark passengers. Twentieth century extendible gangways used in the Overseas Passenger Te ... Read »


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    • George Steers and Co

    • George Steers & Co was a shipyard company at Greenpoint, Long Island, New York. In 1850, James Rich Steers and George Steers started the George Steers & Co. inheriting from a naval architecture tradition. The father Henry Steers was already a naval architect in England. The company was located in Greenpoint, Long ... Read »


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    • Glossary of nautical terms

    • This is a partial glossary of nautical terms; some remain current, while many date from the 17th to 19th centuries. See also , Category:Nautical terms, and Nautical metaphors in English. See the Further reading section for additional words and references. Various measures of the size or cargo carrying capacity of a sh ... Read »


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    • Gripe (tool)

    • A gripe is a simple form of clamp used in building a clinker boat, for temporarily holding the strake which is being fitted onto the one to which it is to be attached. The strake is relatively thin and wide so that it is necessary for the tool to have a long reach while only a small movement is required. This is achiev ... Read »


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    • Gross tonnage

    • Gross tonnage (often abbreviated as GT, G.T. or gt) is a nonlinear measure of a ship's overall internal volume. Gross tonnage is different from gross register tonnage. Neither gross tonnage nor gross register tonnage should be confused with measures of mass or weight such as deadweight tonnage or displacement. Gross t ... Read »


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    • Hawsehole

    • Hawsehole is a nautical term for a small hole in the hull of a ship through which hawsers may be passed. Also known as a cat hole. In the (British) Royal Navy, an officer who had served as a seaman before being promoted was said to have "come in through the hawsehole." ... Read »


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    • Hawser

    • Hawser is a nautical term for a thick cable or rope used in mooring or towing a ship. A hawser passes through a hawsehole, also known as a cat hole, located on the . ... Read »


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    • Hull (watercraft)

    • The hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. Above the hull is the superstructure and/or deckhouse, where present. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline. The structure of the hull varies depending on the vessel type. In a typical modern steel ship, the structure consists of wate ... Read »


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    • Iberian ship development, 1400–1600


    • Ice class

    • Ice class refers to a notation assigned by a classification society or a national authority to denote the additional level of strengthening as well as other arrangements that enable a ship to navigate through sea ice. Some ice classes also have requirements for the ice-going performance of the vessel. The first re ... Read »


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    • In-water survey

    • In-water survey (referred to by various classification societies as IWS, BIS, etc.) is a method of surveying the underwater parts of a ship while it is still afloat instead of having to dry-dock it for examination of these areas as was conventionally done. For cargo ships, two surveys are required within a period of f ... Read »


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    • Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders in Scotland

    • Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders in Scotland

      The Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders in Scotland (IESIS) is a multi-disciplinary professional body and learned society, founded in Scotland, for professional engineers in all disciplines and for those associated with or taking an interest in their work. Its main activities are an annual series of evening talks ... Read »


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    • Ivlia (ship)

    • Ivlia (ship)

      Ivlia (bireme) is a modern reconstruction of an ancient Greek rowing warship (galley) with oars at two levels and an important example of experimental archaeology. Between 1989 and 1994, this vessel undertook six comprehensive international historical and geographical expeditions in the footsteps of the ancient seafare ... Read »


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    • Jib

    • A jib is a triangular staysail that sets ahead of the foremast of a sailing vessel. Its tack is fixed to the bowsprit, to the bow, or to the deck between the bowsprit and the foremost mast. Jibs and spinnakers are the two main types of headsails on a modern boat. Boats may be sailed using a jib alone, more commonl ... Read »


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    • Jumboisation

    • Jumboization is a technique in shipbuilding consisting of enlarging a ship by adding an entire section to it. By contrast with refitting or installation of equipment, jumboization is a long and complex endeavour which can require a specialized shipyard. Enlarging a ship by jumboization allows an increase in its value ... Read »


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    • Keel

    • On boats and ships, keel can refer to either of two parts: a structural element that sometimes resembles a fin and protrudes below a boat along the central line, or a hydrodynamic element. These parts overlap. As the laying down of the keel is the initial step in the construction of a ship, in British and American ship ... Read »


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    • Keel laying

    • Laying the keel or laying down is the formal recognition of the start of a ship's construction. It is often marked with a ceremony attended by dignitaries from the shipbuilding company and the ultimate owners of the ship. Keel laying is one of the four specially-celebrated events in the life of a ship; the others are ... Read »


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    • Kelson

    • The kelson or keelson is the member which, particularly in a wooden vessel, lies parallel with its keel but above the transverse members such as timbers, frames or in a larger vessel, floors. It is fastened to the keel partly to impart additional longitudinal stiffness to it but principally to bind the longitudinal mem ... Read »


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    • Labuan Shipyard and Engineering

    • Labuan Shipyard & Engineering Sdn Bhd (LSE)

      Labuan Shipyard and Engineering is a Malaysian shipbuilding company based in the East Malaysian island of Labuan. It is the biggest shipyard in Borneo. ... Read »


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    • Length between perpendiculars

    • Length between perpendiculars (often abbreviated as p/p, p.p., pp, LPP, LBP or Length BPP) is the length of a ship along the waterline from the forward surface of the stem, or main bow perpendicular member, to the after surface of the sternpost, or main stern perpendicular member. When there is no sternpost, the center ... Read »


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    • Limber hole

    • A limber hole is a drain hole through a frame or other structural member of a boat designed to prevent water from accumulating against one side of the frame, and allowing it to drain toward the bilge. Limber holes are common in the bilges of wooden boats. The term may be extended to cover drain holes in floors. Limber ... Read »


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    • Lindholmsdockan

    • Lindholmsdockan is Sweden's oldest dry dock and is located in Gothenburg, Sweden. It opened in 1875 and is being used as a small marina. ... Read »


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    • List of countries by ship exports

    • The following is a list of countries by ship exports. Data is for 2012, in millions of United States dollars, as reported by The Observatory of Economic Complexity. Currently the top twenty countries are listed. Modernday shipbuilding Shipbuilding countries list Trading in Sea transport report Global trade in float ... Read »


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    • Lofting

    • Lofting is a drafting technique (sometimes using mathematical tables) whereby curved lines are generated, to be used in plans for streamlined objects such as aircraft and boats. The lines may be drawn on wood and the wood then cut for advanced woodworking. The technique can be as simple as bending a flexible object, su ... Read »


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    • Longitudinal framing

    • Longitudinal framing (also called the Isherwood system after British naval architect Sir Joseph Isherwood, who patented it in 1906) is a method of ship construction in which large, widely spaced transverse frames are used in conjunction with light, closely spaced longitudinal members. This method, Isherwood felt, lent ... Read »


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    • Mack (ship)

    • In naval architecture, a Mack is a structure which combines the radar MAsts and the exhaust stACK of a surface ship, thereby saving the upper deck space used for separate funnels and the increasingly large lattice masts used to carry heavy radar aerials. The word itself is a composite of "mast" and "stack". It is a com ... Read »


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    • Magrodome

    • A magrodome is a sliding glass roof found aboard passenger ships. It can be opened and closed automatically depending on the weather and is often positioned over a swimming pool to offer an indoor-outdoor setting. The first magrodome was fitted aboard the SS Oceanic. The primary purpose of the magrodome was to shel ... Read »


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    • Main battery

    • Generally used only in the terms of naval warfare, the main battery is the primary weapon around which a ship was designed. "Battery" is in itself a common term in the military science of artillery. The main battery included all turret guns in ships with gun turrets. Battleships and cruisers were designed around t ... Read »


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    • MEKO

    • The MEKO family of warships was developed by the German company Blohm + Voss. MEKO is a registered trademark. The portmanteau stands for "Mehrzweck-Kombination" (English: multi-purpose-combination). It is a concept in modern naval shipbuilding based on modularity of armament, electronics and other equipment, aiming at ... Read »


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    • Moon pool

    • Moon pool

      A moon pool is a feature of marine drilling platforms, drillships and diving support vessels, some marine research and underwater exploration or research vessels, and underwater habitats, in which it is also known as a wet porch. It is an opening in the floor or base of the hull, platform, or chamber giving access to t ... Read »


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    • Nantucket shipbuilding

    • Nantucket Forests with tall trees had disappeared from the island millennia before colonial settlement. There were no large trees on Nantucket to provide long dimension timbers for ship building or building construction and importing Live oak from southern states was essential. However, in spite of little financial inc ... Read »


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    • Nautical wheelers

    • Nautical wheelers refers to a ship builder that specifically works on the fabrication of hulls of ships. The technique called wheeling is used to form the metal panels that form the hulls of ships. Nautical Wheelers is the name of a song by Jimmy Buffett originally released on the album A1A (Geffen 1974) ... Read »


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    • Naval architecture

    • Naval architecture also known as naval engineering, is an engineering discipline dealing with the engineering design process, shipbuilding, maintenance, and operation of marine vessels and structures. Naval architecture involves basic and applied research, design, development, design evaluation and calculations during ... Read »


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    • Naval stores

    • Naval stores are all products derived from pine sap, which are used to manufacture soap, paint, varnish, shoe polish, lubricants, linoleum, and roofing materials. The term naval stores originally applied to the resin-based components used in building and maintaining wooden sailing ships, a category which includes cord ... Read »


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    • Naval stores industry

    • The naval stores industry collects, processes, and markets forest products refined from the oleoresin of the slash pine and longleaf pine trees (genus Pinus). The industry was associated with the maintenance of the wooden ships and sailing tackle of pre-20th century navies, which were caulked and waterproofed using the ... Read »


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    • Net tonnage

    • Net tonnage (often abbreviated as NT, N.T. or nt) is a dimensionless index calculated from the total moulded volume of the ship's cargo spaces by using a mathematical formula. Defined in The International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships that was adopted by the International Maritime Organization in 1969, the ... Read »


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    • New York Shipbuilding Strike

    • The New York Shipbuilding Strike was a strike that occurred in the Port of New York in the spring of 1934 by the New York Shipbuilding Company. Around 3,100 men took part in the 7-week action, centered at the company's Camden, New Jersey construction yard. A second and longer strike of the company occurred in the spri ... Read »


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    • Nguzu nguzu

    • The nguzu nguzu (sometimes called a musu musu or toto isu) is the traditional figurehead which was formerly affixed to canoes in the Solomon Islands. It was attached to the canoe's prow at the waterline, and was held to provide supernatural protection during expeditions. Nguzu nguzus typically depict bust-length figure ... Read »


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    • Nile boat

    • The Nile River is a major resource for the people living along it, especially thousands of years ago. The El Salha Archaeological Project discovered an abundance of evidence of an ancient boat that traveled the Nile River dating back to 3,000 years ago. Pictographs and pebble carvings were uncovered, indicating a boat ... Read »


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    • No.5 Royal Dock

    • The No.5 Royal Dock is a floating dry dock being built by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME); when complete, it will be the largest floating drydock in the world. The No.5 Royal Dock will be 432m long, 85.6m wide, and will have a capacity of 130,000dwt. No.5 Royal Dock follows on from No.4 Royal Dock ... Read »


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    • Nodosa

    • Nodosa S.L.

      Don Manuel Dopico LamasGalicia Nodosa Shipyard is a Shipyard dedicated to the construction, modification and repair of all kinds of metal hull vessels of up to 150 meters length, as well as general industrial manufacturing. Located in the northwest of Spain, particularly in the region of Galicia, the Shipyard current ... Read »


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    • Oakum

    • Oakum is a preparation of tarred fibre used in shipbuilding for caulking or packing the joints of timbers in wooden vessels and the deck planking of iron and steel ships, as well as cast iron pipe plumbing applications. Oakum was at one time recycled from old tarry ropes and cordage, which were painstakingly unravelled ... Read »


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    • Orlop deck

    • The orlop is the lowest deck in a ship (except for very old ships). It is the deck or part of a deck where the cables are stowed, usually below the water line. It has been suggested the name originates from "overlooping" of the cables. It has also been suggested that the name is a corruption of "overlap", referring to ... Read »


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    • Padded V-hull

    • A padded v-hull is a type of high performance watercraft. They can come in many different configurations from that of a pure race boat to that of a recreational craft. A padded v-hull is very similar in basic shape to the popular v-hull which simply forms a vee when looking at the back of the watercraft. The diffe ... Read »


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    • Pagoda mast

    • The pagoda mast was a type of superstructure that was common on Japanese capital ships that were reconstructed during the 1930s in a bid to improve their fighting performance. These modifications were deemed to be necessary by the Imperial Japanese Navy as a result of the "Battleships Holiday" that was imposed by the W ... Read »


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    • Palmipède


    • Panting (ship construction)

    • Panting refers to the tendency of steel hull plating to flex in and out like an oil can being squeezed when a ship is pitching. This occurs when a ship is making headway in waves. Panting creates significant stress on a ship's hull. It is potentially dangerous and can result in flooding and the separation of the hull a ... Read »


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    • Patent slip

    • The patent slip or marine railway is an inclined plane extending from shoreline into water, featuring a "cradle" onto which a ship is first floated, and a mechanism to haul the ship, attached to the cradle, out of the water onto a slip. The marine railway was invented by Scot Thomas Morton in the early 19th century, as ... Read »


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    • Plank (wood)

    • A plank is timber that is flat, elongated, and rectangular with parallel faces that are higher and longer than wide. Used primarily in carpentry, planks are critical in the construction of ships, houses, bridges, and many other structures. Planks also serve as supports to form shelves and tables. Usually made from saw ... Read »


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    • Pontoon effect

    • The pontoon effect refers to the tendency of a vessel whose flotation depends on lateral pontoons to capsize without warning when a lateral force is applied. The effect can be sudden and dramatic because the vessel is stable and self-righting as greater lateral force is applied, up to the point that the pontoon(s) on o ... Read »


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    • Poop deck

    • In naval architecture, a poop deck is a deck that forms the roof of a cabin built in the rear, or "aft", part of the superstructure of a ship. The name originates from the French word for stern, la poupe, from Latin puppis. Thus the poop deck is technically a stern deck, which in sailing ships was usually elevated as ... Read »


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    • Porthole

    • A porthole, sometimes called bull's-eye window or bull's-eye, is a generally circular window used on the hull of ships to admit light and air. Though the term is of maritime origin, it is also used to describe round windows on armored vehicles, aircraft, automobiles (the Ford Thunderbird a notable example) and even spa ... Read »


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    • Deck prism

    • A deck prism is a prism inserted into the deck of a ship to provide light down below. For centuries, sailing ships used deck prisms to provide a safe source of natural sunlight to illuminate areas below decks. Before electricity, light below a vessel's deck was provided by candles, oil and kerosene lamps—all dang ... Read »


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    • Promenade deck

    • The promenade deck is a deck found on several types of passenger ships and riverboats. It usually extends from bow to stern, on both sides, and includes areas open to the outside, resulting in a continuous outside walkway suitable for promenading, (i.e., walking) thus the name. On older passenger ships, the promenade ... Read »


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    • Quarterdeck

    • The quarterdeck is a raised deck behind the main mast of a sailing ship. Traditionally it was where the captain commanded his vessel and where the ship's colours were kept. This led to it being used as the main ceremonial and reception area on board, and the word is still used to refer to such an area on a ship or even ... Read »


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    • Rake (angle)

    • A rake is an angle of slope measured from horizontal, or from a vertical line 90° perpendicular to horizontal. A 60° rake would mean that the line is pointing 60 up from horizontal, either forwards or backwards relative to the object. There are many ways in which the term can be used. The rake of a ships prow ... Read »


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    • Refit

    • For the boot menu, see rEFIt. Refitting or refit of boats includes repairing, fixing, restoring, renewing, mending, and renovating an old vessel. Refitting has become one of the most important activities inside a shipyard. It offers a variety of services for an old vessel of any size and kind starting with the constru ... Read »


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    • Response amplitude operator

    • In the field of ship design and design of other floating structures, a response amplitude operator (RAO) is an engineering statistic, or set of such statistics, that are used to determine the likely behavior of a ship when operating at sea. Known by the acronym of RAO, response amplitude operators are usually obtained ... Read »


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    • Sail-plan

    • A sail plan is a set of drawings, usually prepared by a naval architect which shows the various combinations of sail proposed for a sailing ship. Alternatively, as a term of art, it refers to the way such vessels are rigged as discussed below. The combinations shown in a sail-plan almost always include three configura ... Read »


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    • Sampson post

    • This is a partial glossary of nautical terms; some remain current, while many date from the 17th to 19th centuries. See also , Category:Nautical terms, and Nautical metaphors in English. See the Further reading section for additional words and references. Various measures of the size or cargo carrying capacity of a sh ... Read »


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    • Sea chest

    • A sea chest is a rectangular or cylindrical recess in the hull of a ship. The sea chest provides an intake reservoir from which piping systems draw raw water. Most sea chests are protected by removable gratings, and contain baffle plates to dampen the effects of vessel speed or sea state. The intake size of sea chests ... Read »


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    • Sea trial

    • A sea trial is the testing phase of a watercraft (including boats, ships, and submarines). It is also referred to as a "shakedown cruise" by many naval personnel. It is usually the last phase of construction and takes place on open water, and it can last from a few hours to many days. Sea trials are conducted to measu ... Read »


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    • Ship cradle

    • A Ship cradle is a rig designed to hold a ship or boat upright on dry land to allow the vessel to be built or repaired. The vessel is held in place in the cradle by wooden chocks, cables, sand bags or restraining fixtures on the cradle. Ship cradles are made of timber or steel and are usually built adjacent the seashor ... Read »


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    • Ship floodability

    • Floodability is the susceptibility of a ship's construction to flooding. It also refers to the ability to intentionally flood certain areas of the hull for damage control purposes, or to increase stability, which is particularly important in combat vessels, which often face the possibility of serious hull breach due to ... Read »


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    • Ship replica

    • A ship replica is a reconstruction of a no longer existing ship. Replicas can range from authentically reconstructed, fully seaworthy ships, to ships of modern construction that give an impression of a historic vessel. Some replicas may not even be seaworthy, but built for other educational or entertainment purposes. ... Read »


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    • Ship stability

    • Ship stability is an area of naval architecture and ship design that deals with how a ship behaves at sea, both in still water and in waves, whether intact or damaged. Stability calculations focus on the center of gravity, center of buoyancy, and metacenter of vessels and on how these interact. Ship stability, as ... Read »


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    • Shipbuilding contract

    • Shipbuilding contract, which is the contract for the complete construction of a ship, concerns the sales of future goods, so the property could not pass title at the time when the contract is concluded. The aim of shipbuilding contract is to regulate a substantial and complex project which the builders and buyers assum ... Read »


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    • Shipbuilding countries

    • Shipbuilding is the construction of ships and other floating vessels. It normally takes place in a specialized facility known as a shipyard. Shipbuilders, also called shipwrights, follow a specialized occupation that traces its roots to before recorded history. Shipbuilding and ship repairs, both commercial and milita ... Read »


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    • Shipbuilding in Bangladesh

    • Shipbuilding is a growing industry in Bangladesh with great potentials. Bangladesh has a long history of shipbuilding dating back to the early modern era. However, shipbuilding has become a major promising industry in recent years when the locally made ships began to be exported. Bangladesh has now over 200 shipbuildin ... Read »


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    • Shipbuilding in Russia

    • Shipbuilding is a developed industry in Russia. The main short-term plan of the industry is the Complex Program to Advance Production of the Shipbuilding Industry on the Market between 2008 and 2015, which was approved by the Russian Government in October 2006. It envisages the establishment of a scientific center at ... Read »


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    • Shipbuilding in Ukraine

    • Ukrainian shipbuilding industry belongs to the industry of engineering. Enterprises of this industry build and repair all types of ships (cargo, passenger, fishing, military,etc.) and other floating structures. Ukrainian shipbuilding actively began to develop in times of Cossacks, when Cossacks began to make sea t ... Read »


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    • Shipfitter

    • A shipfitter is a marine occupational classification used both by naval activities and among ship builders; however, the term applies mostly to certain workers at commercial and naval shipyards during the construction or repair phase of a ship. The term is derived from the words "ship" and "fit" -- essentially, "fitti ... Read »


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    • Shiplift

    • A shiplift is a modern alternative for a slipway, a floating dry dock or a graving dry dock. A shiplift is used to dry dock and launch ships. It consists of a structural platform that is lifted and lowered exactly vertically, synchronously by a number of hoists. First, the platform is lowered underwater, then the ship ... Read »


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    • Shipwrights Way

    • Shipwrights Way, so called because it traces the route timber took from forest to warship, is a 50 mile long-distance footpath through Hampshire, England from Alice Holt Forest to Portsmouth: it passes through Bordon, Liphook, Liss, Petersfield, Queen Elizabeth Country Park, Staunton Country Park, Havant and Hayling Is ... Read »


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    • Worshipful Company of Shipwrights

    • Worshipful Company of Shipwrights

      The Worshipful Company of Shipwrights is one of the ancient livery companies of the City of London. The Shipwrights' Company, unlike other livery companies, has not received a Royal Charter because maritime trade by definition was never confined within the boundaries of the Square Mile; instead a corporate body of Lon ... Read »


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    • Shipyard transporter

    • A Shipyard transporter is a heavy equipment transporter or heavy trailer and is often used in shipyards but is not limited to them. As its name implies, a shipyard transporter is often used in transporting ship sections from the shipbuilder workshop to the dock to assemble a whole vessel. Shipyard transporters adopt h ... Read »


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    • Significant wave height

    • In physical oceanography, the significant wave height (SWH or Hs) is defined traditionally as the mean wave height (trough to crest) of the highest third of the waves (H1/3). Nowadays it is usually defined as four times the standard deviation of the surface elevation – or equivalently as four times the square root ... Read »


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    • Skeg

    • A skeg, (skegg or skag) is a sternward extension of the keel of boats and ships which have a rudder mounted on the centre line. The term also applies to the lowest point on an outboard motor or the outdrive of an inboard/outboard. In more recent years, the name has been used for a fin on a surfboard which improves dire ... Read »


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    • Slamming

    • Slamming is the impact of the bottom structure of a ship onto the sea surface. It is mainly observed while sailing in waves, when the bow raises from the water and subsequently impacts on it. Slamming induces extremely high loads to ship structures and is taken into consideration when designing ships. ... Read »


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    • Slipway

    • A slipway, also known as boat ramp or launch, is a ramp on the shore by which ships or boats can be moved to and from the water. They are used for building and repairing ships and boats. They are also used for launching and retrieving small boats on trailers towed by automobiles and flying boats on their undercarriage. ... Read »


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    • Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

    • The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

      The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) is a global professional society that provides a forum for the advancement of the engineering profession as applied to the marine field. Although it particularly names the naval architecture and marine engineering specialties, the society includes all types o ... Read »


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    • Special Hull Treatment

    • Special Hull Treatment was the process, devised in the 1980s, by which defense contractors coated the outsides of the hulls of submarines with a rubberized tile that was designed to deaden noise, redirect sound waves, and absorb or contain hull noise. The tiles, measuring about 12 inches square resemble an octopus ten ... Read »


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    • Sponson

    • Sponsons are projections extending from the sides of land vehicles, aircraft or water craft to provide protection, stability, storage locations, mounting points, or equipment housing. On watercraft, a sponson is a projection that extends outward (usually from the hull, but sometimes other parts of the vessel) to i ... Read »


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    • Steerage (deck)

    • Steerage is the lower deck of a ship, where the cargo is stored above the closed hold. In the late 19th and early 20th century, steamship steerage decks were used to provide the lowest cost and lowest class of travel, such as for European immigrants to North America. With limited privacy and security, inadequate sanita ... Read »


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    • Steerage (ship)

    • Steerage is the act of steering a ship. The rudder of a vessel can steer the ship only when water is passing over it. Hence, when a ship is not moving relative to the water it is in or cannot move its rudder, it does not respond to the helm and is said to have "lost steerage." The motion of a ship through the water is ... Read »


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    • Steering pole

    • A steering pole is a light spar extending from the bow of a straight deck ship which aids the wheelsman in steering. Ancient literature indicates that steering poles have long been part of boat construction, and are referred to in ancient texts such as the Epic of Gilgamesh. ... Read »


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    • Stem (ship)

    • The stem is the most forward part of a boat or ship's bow and is an extension of the keel itself. It is often found on wooden boats or ships, but not exclusively. The stem is the curved edge stretching from the keel below, up to the gunwale of the boat. It is part of the physical structure of a wooden boat or shi ... Read »


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    • Stern

    • The stern is the back or aft-most part of a ship or boat, technically defined as the area built up over the sternpost, extending upwards from the counter rail to the taffrail. The stern lies opposite of the bow, the foremost part of a ship. Originally, the term only referred to the aft port section of the ship, but eve ... Read »


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    • Stowage

    • In naval architecture, stowage is the amount of room available for stowing materials aboard a ship, tank or an airplane. In container shipping, stowage planning refers to the arrangement of containers on board a container vessel. The stowage of a container ship involves different objectives, such as to optimize the av ... Read »


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    • Strake

    • A strake or stringer is part of the shell of the hull of a boat or ship which, in conjunction with the other strakes, keeps the vessel watertight and afloat. It is a strip of planking in a wooden vessel or of plating in a metal one, running longitudinally along the vessel's side, bottom or the turn of the bilge, usuall ... Read »


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    • Strength of ships

    • The strength of ships is a topic of key interest to naval architects and shipbuilders. Ships which are built too strong are heavy, slow, and cost extra money to build and operate since they weigh more, whilst ships which are built too weakly suffer from minor hull damage and in some extreme cases catastrophic failure a ... Read »


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    • Strip-built

    • Strip-built is a method of boat building commonly used for canoes and kayaks, but also suitable for larger boats. The process involves securing narrow, flexible strips of wood edge-to-edge around temporary forms. These are the most popular among homebuilders. Some professional builders also offer both kits and finishe ... Read »


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    • Superstructure

    • A superstructure is an upward extension of an existing structure above a baseline. This term is applied to various kinds of physical structures such as buildings, bridges, or ships having the degree of freedom zero (in the terms of theory of machines). The word "superstructure" is a combination of the Latin prefix, sup ... Read »


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    • Three-island principle

    • The three-island principle was a technique used in the construction of steel-hulled ships whereby a ship was built with a forecastle, bridge deck, and poop. The technique allowed the economical and efficient construction of ships and was particularly common in tramp steamers and smaller vessels of the nineteenth and ea ... Read »


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    • Trailboard

    • The trailboards are a pair of boards that may be found at the bow of certain sailing vessels, where they run from the figurehead or billethead back to or towards the hawsepipe. They are in the main decorative, though they often bear the name of the ship; they may be more or less elaborately carved and painted. ... Read »


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    • Transom stern

    • The stern is the back or aft-most part of a ship or boat, technically defined as the area built up over the sternpost, extending upwards from the counter rail to the taffrail. The stern lies opposite of the bow, the foremost part of a ship. Originally, the term only referred to the aft port section of the ship, but eve ... Read »


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    • Treenail

    • A treenail, also trenail, trennel, or trunnel, is a wooden peg, pin, or dowel used to fasten pieces of wood together, especially in timber frames, covered bridges, wooden shipbuilding and boat building. Many such buildings and bridges are still in use.Locust is a favorite wood when making trunnels in shipbuilding due t ... Read »


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    • Tribon

    • Tribon is a naval architecture program originally developed by Kockum Computer Systems (KCS) for designing commercial and naval vessels. KCS was spun off from Kockums shipyards as an independent company, later renamed Tribon Systems, which was in turn acquired by AVEVA in 2004. Tribon is actually a family of programs ... Read »


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    • Tumblehome

    • In naval architecture, the tumblehome is the narrowing of a ship's hull with greater distance above the water-line. Expressed more technically, it is present when the beam at the uppermost deck is less than the maximum beam of the vessel. A small amount of tumblehome is normal in many designs in order to allow any sma ... Read »


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    • Tunnel hull

    • A tunnel hull is a type of boat hull that uses two typically planing hulls with a solid centre that traps air. This entrapment then creates aerodynamic lift in addition to the planing (hydrodynamic) lift from the hulls. Many times this is attributed to ground effect. Theoretical research and full-scale testing of tunne ... Read »


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    • Turret deck ship

    • A turret deck ship is a type of merchant ship with an unusual hull, designed and built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The hulls of turret deck vessels were rounded and stepped inward above their waterlines. This gave some advantages in strength and allowed them to pay lower canal tolls under tonnage measure ... Read »


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    • Turret ship

    • Turret ships were a 19th-century type of warship, the earliest to have their guns mounted in a revolving gun turret, instead of a broadside arrangement. Before the development of large-calibre, long-range guns in the mid-19th century, the classic battleship design used rows of port-mounted guns on each side of the ... Read »


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    • Type RO 15

    • Cargo ships of the class Type RO 15 are RoRo vessels built by Wismar's Mathias Thesen Yard. The class was built in 1982/83 and consists of 3 units. Coordinates: 27°59′15″N 34°27′12″E / 27.9874°N 34.4534°E / 27.9874; 34.4534 ... Read »


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    • Ultra light displacement boat

    • An ultra light displacement boat (or ULDB) is a modern form of watercraft with limited displacement relative to the hull size (waterline length). ... Read »


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    • V-hull (boat)

    • A V-hull, is the shape of a boat or ship in which the contours of the hull come in a straight line to the keel. V-hull designs are usually used in smaller boats and are useful in providing space for ballast inside the boat. ... Read »


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    • Venetian Arsenal

    • The Venetian Arsenal (Italian: Arsenale di Venezia) is a complex of former shipyards and armories clustered together in the city of Venice in northern Italy. Owned by the state, the Arsenal was responsible for the bulk of the Venetian republic's naval power during the middle part of the second millennium AD. It was "on ... Read »


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    • Wale

    • A wale is a thick plank of wood fastened to the side of a ship to provide protection from wear. The garboard is the wale next to the keel; the gunwale is the top such plank and covers the heads of the timbers between the main and fore drifts. Wale is also a term for a horizontal member of a tieback wall which transmit ... Read »


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    • Waterline length

    • The waterline length (originally Load Waterline Length, abbreviated to LWL) is the length of a ship or boat at the point where it sits in the water. It excludes the total length of the boat, such as features that are out of the water. Most boats rise outwards at the bow and stern, so a boat may be quite a bit longer th ... Read »


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    • Well deck

    • In traditional nautical use, well decks were decks lower than decks fore and aft, usually at the main deck level, so that breaks appear in the main deck profile, as opposed to a flush deck profile. The term goes back to the days of sail. Late-20th-Century commercial and military amphibious ships have applied the term t ... Read »


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    • Well dock

    • In modern amphibious warfare usage, a well dock or well deck, officially termed a wet well in U.S. Navy instructions when the well deck is flooded for operations, is a hangar-like deck located at the waterline in the stern of some amphibious warfare ships. By taking on water the ship can lower its stern, flooding the w ... Read »


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    • Windlass room

    • A windlass room is a triangular space enclosed within the bow of a freshwater ship where the anchor windlasses are located. Often, windlasses for handling docklines are located here as well. This room is where the forecastle of a saltwater ship would be located. ... Read »


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    • Winged keel

    • The Winged Keel is a sailboat keel originally designed by Ben Lexcen and made its first appearance on the 12-metre class yacht Australia II in the 1983 America's Cup. Along with Australia II's efficient sail design, this keel was one of the factors contributing to Australia II's success. The increased stability afforde ... Read »


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    • Worm shoe

    • A worm shoe is a strip of wood such as oak or pine which is fixed to the keel of a wooden boat to protect it from shipworms. The wood is sacrificed to the worms while the main structure is kept separate and safe using a layer of tar paper or creosoted felt, which the worms will not penetrate. ... Read »


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    • Inverted bow

    • In ship design, an inverted bow (occasionally also referred to as reverse bow) is a ship's or large boat's bow whose farthest forward point is not at the top. The result may somewhat resemble a submarine's bow. Inverted bows maximize the length of waterline and hence the hull speed, and have often better hydrodynamic d ... Read »


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    • Shipyard

    • A shipyard (also called a dockyard) is a place where ships are repaired and built. These can be yachts, military vessels, cruise liners or other cargo or passenger ships. Dockyards are sometimes more associated with maintenance and basing activities than shipyards, which are sometimes associated more with initial const ... Read »


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    • Yard (sailing)

    • A yard is a spar on a mast from which sails are set. It may be constructed of timber or steel or from more modern materials like aluminium or carbon fibre. Although some types of fore and aft rigs have yards, the term is usually used to describe the horizontal spars used on square rigged sails. In addition, for some de ... Read »


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    • Zaporizhia Shipbuilding-Shiprepair Plant

    • Zaporizhia Shipbuilding-ShipRepair Plant is a civil shipbuilding company that carries out the repair of vessels and ships to the needs of river and sea fleet, located in Zaporizhia (Ukraine). The branch of a joint-stock shipping company "Ukrrichflot." The factory has a developed shipbuilding base, including technology ... Read »


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