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  • Plot (narrative)

    Plot (narrative)

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Plot (narrative)

    • Elements of fiction

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Elements of fiction


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    • Fiction with alternate endings

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    • Interactive narrative

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Interactive narrative


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    • A-Plot

    • A-Plot is a cinema and television term referring to the plotline that drives the story. This does not necessarily mean it is the most important, but rather the one that forces most of the action. ... Read »


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    • Anagnorisis

    • Anagnorisis (/ˌænəɡˈnɒráµ»sáµ»s/; Ancient Greek: ἀναγνώρισις) is a moment in a play or other work when a character makes a critical discovery. Anagnorisis originally meant recognition in its Greek context, not only of a person but also of what that person st ... Read »


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    • Babies switched at birth

    • Babies switched at birth are babies who, because of either error or maleficence, are interchanged with each other at birth or very soon thereafter, leading to the babies being unknowingly raised by parents who are not their biological parents. The occurrence is rare in real life, but common as a plot device in novels a ... Read »


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    • Backstory

    • A backstory, background story, back-story, or background is a set of events invented for a plot, presented as preceding and leading up to that plot. It is a literary device of a narrative history all chronologically earlier than the narrative of primary interest. It is the history of characters and other elements that ... Read »


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    • Catharsis

    • Catharsis (from Greek katharsis meaning "purification" or "cleansing") is the purification and purgation of emotions—especially pity and fear—through art or any extreme change in emotion that results in renewal and restoration. It is a metaphor originally used by Aristotle in the Poetics, comparing the effec ... Read »


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    • Causal loop

    • A causal loop, in the context of time travel or retrocausality, is a sequence of events (actions, information, objects, people) in which an event is among the causes of another event, which in turn is among the causes of the first-mentioned event. Such causally-looped events then exist in spacetime, but their origin ca ... Read »


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    • Cliffhanger

    • A cliffhanger or cliffhanger ending is a plot device in fiction which features a main character in a precarious or difficult dilemma, or confronted with a shocking revelation at the end of an episode of serialized fiction. A cliffhanger is hoped to ensure the audience will return to see how the characters resolve the d ... Read »


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    • Climax (narrative)

    • The climax (from the Greek word κλῖμαξ, meaning "staircase" and "ladder") or turning point of a narrative work is its point of highest tension and drama, or it is the time when the action starts during which the solution is given. The climax of a story is a literary element. The punch line of a ... Read »


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    • Dangler (plot device)

    • Dangler is a literary term meaning a plotline that is metaphorically left to "dangle" or "hang". A dangler, or dangling plotline, is a plot device in fiction where a plotline is forgotten, phased out and eventually dropped, thus a resolution is never achieved. Although dangling plotlines can occur in all forms of media ... Read »


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    • Deathtrap (plot device)

    • A deathtrap is a literary and dramatic plot device in which a villain who has captured the hero or another sympathetic character attempts to use an elaborate and usually sadistic method of murdering him/her. It is often used as a means to create dramatic tension in the story and to have the villain reveal important in ... Read »


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    • Dionysian imitatio

    • Dionysian imitatio is the influential literary method of imitation as formulated by Greek author Dionysius of Halicarnassus in the first century BCE, which conceived it as the rhetorical practice of emulating, adapting, reworking and enriching a source text by an earlier author. It is a departure from the concept of mi ... Read »


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    • Dramatic structure

    • Dramatic structure (also called Freytag's pyramid) is the structure of a dramatic work such as a play or film. Many scholars have analyzed dramatic structure, beginning with Aristotle in his Poetics (c. 335 BCE). This article focuses primarily on Gustav Freytag's analysis of ancient Greek and Shakespearean drama. ... Read »


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    • Dramatistic pentad

    • The dramatistic pentad forms the core structure of dramatism, a method for examining motivations that the renowned literary critic Kenneth Burke developed. Dramatism recommends the use of a metalinguistic approach to stories about human action that investigates the roles and uses of five rhetorical elements common to a ... Read »


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    • Eavesdropping

    • Eavesdropping is secretly listening to the private conversation of others without their consent, as defined by Black's Law Dictionary. The practice is commonly believed to be unethical. The verb eavesdrop is a back-formation from the noun eavesdropper ("a person who eavesdrops"), which was formed from the unrelate ... Read »


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    • Epiphany (feeling)

    • An epiphany (from the ancient Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, "manifestation, striking appearance") is an experience of sudden and striking realization. Generally the term is used to describe scientific breakthrough, religious or philosophical discoveries, but it can apply in any situation in ... Read »


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    • Episodic storytelling

    • Episodic storytelling is when a story is narrated through episodes, as opposed to chapters, which are typically seen in novels. The term used in literature to refer to a body of work composed of episodes or similar installments is serial. Serials are also known as episodic fiction. Multiple episodes are usually groupe ... Read »


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    • Ethos

    • Ethos (/ˈiːθɒs/ or US /ˈiːθoʊs/) is a Greek word meaning "character" that is used to describe the guiding beliefs or ideals that characterize a community, nation, or ideology. The Greeks also used this word to refer to the power of music to influence emotions, behaviours, and even morals. Early ... Read »


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    • Fabel

    • Fabel is a critical term and a dramaturgical technique pioneered by the twentieth-century German theatre practitioner Bertolt Brecht. Fabel should not be confused with 'fable', which is a form of short narrative (hence the retention of the original German spelling in its adoption into English usage). Elizabeth Wright ... Read »


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    • Flashback (narrative)

    • A flashback is an interjected scene that takes the narrative back in time from the current point in the story. Flashbacks are often used to recount events that happened before the story's primary sequence of events to fill in crucial backstory. In the opposite direction, a flashforward (or prolepsis) reveals events tha ... Read »


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    • Flashforward

    • A flashforward (also spelled flash-forward; also called a prolepsis) is a scene that temporarily takes the narrative forward in time from the current point of the story in literature, film, television and other media. Flashforwards are often used to represent events expected, projected, or imagined to occur in the futu ... Read »


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    • Formula fiction

    • In popular culture, formula fiction is literature in which the storylines and plots have been reused to the extent that the narratives are predictable. It is similar to genre fiction, which identifies a number of specific settings that are frequently reused. The label of formula fiction is used in literary criticism as ... Read »


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    • Found footage (film technique)

    • Found footage is a subgenre in films in which all or a substantial part of a fictional film is presented as if it were discovered film or video recordings. The events on screen are typically seen through the camera of one or more of the characters involved, often accompanied by their real-time off-camera commentary. Fo ... Read »


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    • Frame story

    • A frame story (also known as a frame tale or frame narrative) is a literary technique that sometimes serves as a companion piece to a story within a story, whereby an introductory or main narrative is presented, at least in part, for the purpose of setting the stage either for a more emphasized second narrative or for ... Read »


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    • Hamartia

    • The term hamartia derives from the Greek ἁμαρτία, from ἁμαρτάνειν hamartánein, which means "to miss the mark" or "to err". It is most often associated with Greek tragedy, although it is also used in Christian theology.Hamartia as it pertains to dramatic literatu ... Read »


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    • Happy ending

    • A happy ending is an ending of the plot of a work of fiction in which almost everything turns out for the best for the protagonists, their sidekicks, and almost everyone except the villains. In storylines where the protagonists are in physical danger, a happy ending mainly consists in their surviving and successfully ... Read »


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    • Imitation (art)

    • Imitation is the doctrine of artistic creativity according to which the creative process should be based on the close imitation of the masterpieces of the preceding authors. This concept was first formulated by Dionysius of Halicarnassus in the first century BCE as imitatio, and has since dominated for almost two thous ... Read »


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    • User:Jennaoconnell7/sandbox/Altaica (Book One in the Chronicles of Altaica)


    • Lexis (Aristotle)

    • In philosophical discourse, lexis (from the Greek: λέξις "word") is a complete group of words in a language, vocabulary, the total set of all words in a language, and all words that have meaning or a function in grammar. According to Plato, lexis is the manner of lpp speaking. Plato said that lexis ... Read »


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    • MacGuffin

    • In fiction, a MacGuffin (sometimes McGuffin or maguffin) is a plot device in the form of some goal, desired object, or other motivator that the protagonist pursues, often with little or no narrative explanation. The specific nature of a MacGuffin is typically unimportant to the overall plot. The most common type of Mac ... Read »


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    • Mimesis

    • Mimesis (/maɪˈmiːsəs/; Ancient Greek: μίμησις (mÄ«mēsis), from μιμεῖσθαι (mÄ«meisthai), "to imitate," from (mimos), "imitator, actor") is a critical and philosophical term that carries a wide range of meanings, which include imitation, representat ... Read »


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    • Mythos (Aristotle)

    • Mythos is the term used by Aristotle in his Poetics (c. 335 BCE) for the plot of an Athenian tragedy. It is the first of the six elements of tragedy that he gives. “In Poetics 13 and 14, Aristotle turns from the discussion of the three separate parts of the plot to a consideration of the plot as a whole compo ... Read »


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    • Narrative hook

    • A narrative hook (or just hook) is a literary technique in the opening of a story that "hooks" the reader's attention so that he or she will keep on reading. The "opening" may consist of several paragraphs for a short story, or several pages for a novel, but ideally it is the opening sentence. One of the most comm ... Read »


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    • Peripeteia

    • Peripeteia /ˌpɛrəpᵻˈtaɪ.ə/ (Greek: περιπέτεια) is a reversal of circumstances, or turning point. The term is primarily used with reference to works of literature. The Anglicized form of peripeteia is peripety. Aristotle, in his Poetics, defines peripeteia as "a ... Read »


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    • Plot device

    • A plot device (or plot mechanism) is any technique in a narrative used to move the plot forward. A or arbitrary plot device may annoy or confuse the reader, causing a loss of the suspension of disbelief. However a well-crafted plot device, or one that emerges naturally from the setting or characters of the story, may ... Read »


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    • Plot hole

    • In fiction, a plot hole, plothole or plot error is a gap or inconsistency in a storyline that goes against the flow of logic established by the story's plot. Such inconsistencies include such things as illogical or impossible events, and statements or events that contradict earlier events in the storyline. While many ... Read »


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    • Plot point

    • For the role-playing games concept see Plot point (role-playing games) In television and film, a plot point is a significant event within a plot that spins the action around in another direction. Noted screenwriting teacher Syd Field discusses plot points in his paradigm, popularized in his book Screenplay: The Found ... Read »


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    • Plot twist

    • A plot twist is a radical change in the expected direction or outcome of the plot of a novel, film, television series, comic, video game, or other work of narrative. It is a common practice in narration used to keep the interest of an audience, usually surprising them with a revelation. Some "twists" are foreshadowed. ... Read »


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    • Poetics (Aristotle)

    • Aristotle's Poetics (Greek: Περὶ ποιητικῆς, Latin: De Poetica; c. 335 BCE) is the earliest surviving work of dramatic theory and the first extant philosophical treatise to focus on literary theory. This has been the traditional view for centuries. However, recent work is now c ... Read »


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    • Quest

    • A quest serves as a plot device in mythology and fiction: a difficult journey towards a goal, often symbolic or allegorical. Tales of quests figure prominently in the folklore of every nation and ethnic culture. In literature, the object of a quest requires great exertion on the part of the hero, who must overcome many ... Read »


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    • Red herring

    • A red herring is something that misleads or distracts from a relevant or important issue. It may be either a logical fallacy or a literary device that leads readers or audiences towards a false conclusion. A red herring might be intentionally used, such as in mystery fiction or as part of rhetorical strategies (e.g. in ... Read »


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    • Reveal (narrative)

    • The reveal (also known as the big reveal) is a plot device in narrative structure, and is the exposure to the reader or audience of a previously hidden key element of plot or of the performance. This may result in a plot twist, and could be the key plot turn or unexpected coda in the story – in the mystery genre, ... Read »


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    • Reverse chronology

    • Reverse chronology is a method of story-telling whereby the plot is revealed in reverse order. In a story employing this technique, the first scene shown is actually the conclusion to the plot. Once that scene ends, the penultimate scene is shown, and so on, so that the final scene the viewer sees is the first chronol ... Read »


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    • Roman à tiroirs


    • Scene (drama)

    • In drama, a scene is a unit of action, often a subdivision of an act. A "French scene" is a scene in which the beginning and end are marked by a change in the presence of characters onstage, rather than by the lights going up or down or the set being changed. From the French scène à faire, an obligatory sce ... Read »


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    • Screenwriting

    • Screenwriting, also called scriptwriting, is the art and craft of writing scripts for mass media such as feature films, television productions or video games. It is frequently a freelance profession. Screenwriters are responsible for researching the story, developing the narrative, writing the screenplay, and deliveri ... Read »


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    • Self-fulfilling prophecy

    • A self-fulfilling prophecy is a prediction that directly or indirectly causes itself to become true, by the very terms of the prophecy itself, due to positive feedback between belief and behavior. Although examples of such prophecies can be found in literature as far back as ancient Greece and ancient India, it is 20th ... Read »


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    • Sexual tension

    • Sexual tension is a social phenomenon that occurs when two individuals interact and one or both feel sexual desire, but the consummation is postponed or never happens. A common scenario is where the two individuals function in close proximity, such as co-workers or in a group of friends, but do not have sex to avoid aw ... Read »


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    • Story arc

    • A story arc is an extended or continuing storyline in episodic storytelling media such as television, comic books, comic strips, boardgames, video games, and films with each episode following a narrative arc. On a television program, for example, the story would unfold over many episodes. In television, the use of the ... Read »


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    • Story generator

    • A story generator or plot generator is a tool that generates basic narratives or plot ideas. The generator could be in the form of a computer program, a chart with multiple columns, a book composed of panels that flip independently of one another, or a set of several adjacent reels that spin independently of one anothe ... Read »


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    • Story within a story

    • A story within a story is a literary device in which one character within a narrative narrates.Mise en abyme is the French term for a similar literary device (also referring to the practice in heraldry of placing the image of a small shield on a larger shield). A story within a story can be used in all types of narrati ... Read »


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    • Subplot

    • In fiction, a subplot is a secondary strand of the plot that is a supporting side story for any story or the main plot. Subplots may connect to main plots, in either time and place or in thematic significance. Subplots often involve supporting characters, those besides the protagonist or antagonist. Subplots are disti ... Read »


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    • Suspension of disbelief

    • The term suspension of disbelief or willing suspension of disbelief has been defined as a willingness to suspend one's critical faculties and believe the unbelievable; sacrifice of realism and logic for the sake of enjoyment. The term was coined in 1817 by the poet and aesthetic philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who ... Read »


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    • Three-act structure

    • The three-act structure is a model used in screenwriting that divides a fictional narrative into three parts (acts), often called the Setup, the Confrontation and the Resolution. The first act is usually used for exposition, to establish the main characters, their relationships and the world they live in. Later in ... Read »


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    • Types of fiction with multiple endings

    • Multiple endings refer to a case in entertainment where the story could end in different ways. Since multiple endings usually require audience participation, books are able to capture the concept better than movies or television. However, for the sake of telling a story, this device is rarely used. An example is t ... Read »


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    • Vignette (literature)

    • In a novel, theatrical script, screenplay, sketch stories, and poetry, a vignette is a short impressionistic scene that focuses on one moment or character and gives a trenchant impression about that character, an idea, setting, and/or object. It's a short, descriptive passage that's more about evoking meaning through i ... Read »


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    • Plot (narrative)

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