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  • Plant nutrition

    Plant nutrition

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Plant nutrition

    • Fertilizers

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Fertilizers


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    • Akadama

    • Akadama (赤玉土, akadamatsuchi?, red ball earth) is a naturally occurring, granular clay-like mineral used as soil for bonsai trees and other container-grown plants. It is surface-mined, immediately sifted and bagged, and supplied in various grades: the deeper-mined grade being somewhat harder and more us ... Read »


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    • Autotroph

    • An autotroph ("self-feeding", from the Greek autos "self" and trophe "nourishing") or producer, is an organism that produces complex organic compounds (such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins) from simple substances present in its surroundings, generally using energy from light (photosynthesis) or inorganic chemical ... Read »


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    • Cluster root

    • Proteoid roots, also known as cluster roots, are plant roots that form clusters of closely spaced short lateral rootlets. They may form a two- to five-centimetre-thick mat just beneath the leaf litter. They enhance nutrient uptake, possibly by chemically modifying the soil environment to improve nutrient solubilisation ... Read »


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    • Fertigation

    • Fertigation is the of fertilizers, soil amendments, and other water-soluble products into an irrigation system. Fertigation is related to chemigation, the injection of chemicals into an irrigation system. The two terms are sometimes used interchangeably however chemigation is generally a more controlled and regulated ... Read »


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    • Humin

    • Humins are a class of organic compounds that are insoluble in water at all pH's. The term is used in two related contexts, in soil chemistry and saccharide chemistry. These dark brown solids are inhomogenous and their structures are often vaguely described. Soil consists of both mineral (inorganic) and organic compone ... Read »


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    • Mineralization (biology)

    • Process through which an organic substance becomes impregnated by or turned into inorganic substances. Note 1: A particular case is the process by which living organisms produce and structure minerals often to harden or stiffen existing tissues. (See biomineralization.) Note 2: In the case of polymer biodegradation, ... Read »


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    • Mycotroph

    • A mycotroph is a plant that gets all or part of its carbon, water, or nutrient supply through symbiotic association with fungi. The term can refer to plants that engage in either of two distinct symbioses with fungi: ... Read »


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    • Photosynthesis

    • Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy into chemical energy that can later be released to fuel the organisms' activities (energy transformation). This chemical energy is stored in carbohydrate molecules, such as sugars, which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water ... Read »


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    • Plant nutrition

    • Plant nutrition is the study of the chemical elements and compounds necessary for plant growth, plant metabolism and their external supply. In 1972, Emanuel Epstein defined two criteria for an element to be essential for plant growth: This is in accordance with Justus von Liebig's law of the minimum. The essential pla ... Read »


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    • Rhizobiaceae

    • Rhizobiaceae

      The Rhizobiaceae is a family of proteobacteria comprising multiple subgroups that enhance and hinder plant development. Some bacteria's found in the family are used for plant nutrition and collectively make up the rhizobia. Consequently, other bacteria's such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes severely alte ... Read »


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    • Soil pH

    • The soil pH is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity in soils. pH is defined as the negative logarithm (base 10) of the activity of hydronium ions (H+ or, more precisely, H 3O+ aq) in a solution. In water, it normally ranges from -1 to 14, with 7 being neutral. A pH below 7 is acidic and above 7 is alkaline. Soil p ... Read »


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    • Soil texture

    • Soil texture is known as a qualitative classification instrument used both in the field and laboratory for agricultural soils to determine classes based on their physical texture. While classes are distinguished in the field and the class is then used to determine crop suitability and to approximate the soils responses ... Read »


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    • Substrate (biology)

    • In biology, a substrate is the surface on which an organism (such as a plant, fungus, or animal) lives. A substrate can include biotic or abiotic materials and animals. For example, encrusting algae that lives on a rock (its substrate) can be itself a substrate for an animal that lives on top of the algae. Require ... Read »


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    • Trace element

    • A trace element is a chemical element whose concentration (or other measure of amount) is very low ( a "trace amount"). The exact definition depends on the field of science: ... Read »


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    • Watering can

    • A watering can (or watering pot) is a portable container, usually with a handle and a spout, used to water plants by hand. It has been in use from at least the 17th century and has since seen many improvements in design. Apart from watering plants, it has varied uses, as it is a fairly versatile tool. The capacity of ... Read »


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