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    Physical phenomena

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    • Doppler effects

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Doppler effects


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    • Earth phenomena

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Earth phenomena


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    • Electrical phenomena

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Electrical phenomena


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    • Ionization

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ionization


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    • Motion (physics)

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Motion (physics)


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    • Optical phenomena

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Optical phenomena


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    • Radiation

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Radiation


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    • Stellar phenomena

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Stellar phenomena


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    • Transport phenomena

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Transport phenomena


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    • Waves

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Waves


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    • Weather

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Weather


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    • Aharonov–Bohm effect


    • Aharonov–Casher effect


    • Andreev reflection

    • Andreev reflection (AR), named after the Russian physicist Alexander F. Andreev, is a type of particle scattering which occurs at interfaces between a superconductor (S) and a normal state material (N). It is a charge-transfer process by which normal current in N is converted to supercurrent in S. Each Andreev reflecti ... Read »


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    • Askaryan effect

    • The Askaryan effect is the phenomenon whereby a particle traveling faster than the phase velocity of light in a dense dielectric (such as salt, ice or the lunar regolith) produces a shower of secondary charged particles which contain a charge anisotropy and thus emits a cone of coherent radiation in the radio or microw ... Read »


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    • Biefeld–Brown effect


    • Buttered toast phenomenon

    • The buttered toast phenomenon is the tendency of buttered toast to land butter-side down after it falls. This has been considered to be a representation of pessimistic ideas. Murphy's law takes credit for this, but science and physics proved it happens in the right environment. The phenomenon is said to be an old ... Read »


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    • Butterfly effect

    • The butterfly effect is the concept that small causes can have large effects. Initially, it was used with weather prediction but later the term became a metaphor used in and out of science. In chaos theory, the butterfly effect is the sensitive dependence on initial conditions in which a small change in one state of a ... Read »


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    • Casimir effect

    • In quantum field theory, the Casimir effect and the Casimir–Polder force are physical forces arising from a quantized field. They are named after the Dutch physicist Hendrik Casimir who predicted them in 1948. The typical example is of the two uncharged conductive plates in a vacuum, placed a few nanometers apart ... Read »


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    • Casimir pressure

    • Casimir pressure is created by the Casimir force of virtual particles. According to experiments, the Casimir force F{\displaystyle F} between two closely spaced neutral parallel plate conductors is directly proportional to their surface area A{\displaystyle A}: F=PA.{\displaystyle F=PA.} Therefore, dividing the magn ... Read »


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    • Coandă effect


    • Coffee ring effect

    • In physics, a "coffee ring" is a pattern left by a puddle of particle-laden liquid after it evaporates. The phenomenon is named for the characteristic ring-like deposit along the perimeter of a spill of coffee. It is also commonly seen after spilling red wine. The mechanism behind the formation of these and similar rin ... Read »


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    • Condensation cloud

    • A transient condensation cloud, also called Wilson cloud, is observable at large explosions in humid air. When a nuclear weapon or a large amount of a conventional explosive is detonated in sufficiently humid air, the "negative phase" of the shock wave causes a rarefaction (reduction in density) of the air surrounding ... Read »


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    • Coriolis force

    • In physics, the Coriolis force is an inertial force (also called a fictitious force) that acts on objects that are in motion relative to a rotating reference frame. In a reference frame with clockwise rotation, the force acts to the left of the motion of the object. In one with anticlockwise rotation, the force acts to ... Read »


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    • Doppler broadening

    • In atomic physics, Doppler broadening is the broadening of spectral lines due to the Doppler effect caused by a distribution of velocities of atoms or molecules. Different velocities of the emitting particles result in different Doppler shifts, the cumulative effect of which is the line broadening. This resulting line ... Read »


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    • Dynamic scaling

    • The dynamic scaling is the litmus test of showing that an evolving system exhibits self-similarity. In general a function is said to exhibit dynamic scaling if it satisfies Here the exponent θ{\displaystyle \theta } is fixed by the dimensional requirement [f]=[tθ]{\displaystyle [f]=[t^{\theta }]}. Now, the numer ... Read »


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    • Hanle effect

    • The Hanle effect is a reduction in the polarization of light when the atoms emitting the light are subject to a magnetic field in a particular direction, and when they have themselves been excited by polarized light. It is named after Wilhelm Hanle, who first described it in Zeitschrift für Physik in 1924. Attempts ... Read »


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    • Kondo effect

    • In physics, the Kondo effect describes the scattering of conduction electrons in a metal due to magnetic impurities, resulting in a characteristic change in electrical resistivity with temperature. The effect was first described by Jun Kondo, who applied third-order perturbation theory to the problem, which predicted ... Read »


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    • Leidenfrost effect

    • The Leidenfrost effect is a physical phenomenon in which a liquid, in near contact with a mass significantly hotter than the liquid's boiling point, produces an insulating vapor layer keeping that liquid from boiling rapidly. Due to this 'repulsive force', a droplet hovers over the surface rather than making physical c ... Read »


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    • Marangoni effect

    • The Marangoni effect (also called the Gibbs–Marangoni effect) is the mass transfer along an interface between two fluids due to surface tension gradient. In the case of temperature dependence, this phenomenon may be called thermo-capillary convection (or Bénard–Marangoni convection). This phenomenon w ... Read »


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    • Mössbauer effect


    • Photophoresis

    • Photophoresis denotes the phenomenon that small particles suspended in gas (aerosols) or liquids (hydrocolloids) start to migrate when illuminated by a sufficiently intense beam of light. The existence of this phenomenon is owed to a non-uniform distribution of temperature of an illuminated particle in a fluid medium. ... Read »


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    • Pouillet effect

    • In physics, the term Pouillet effect refers to an exothermic reaction that takes place when a liquid is added to a powder. It was first observed by Leslie in 1802 when dry sand was immersed in water. Claude Pouillet later described this phenomenon in 1822 when it came to be known as the Pouillet effect in France. ... Read »


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    • Prandtl–Glauert singularity


    • Radiation trapping

    • Radiation trapping, imprisonment of resonance radiation, radiative transfer of spectral lines, line transfer or radiation diffusion is a phenomenon in physics whereby radiation may be "trapped" in a system as it is emitted by one atom and absorbed by another. ... Read »


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    • Ramsauer–Townsend effect


    • Revolving rivers

    • Revolving rivers are a surprising, uncommon way of sand pile growth that can be found in a few sands around the world, but has been studied in detail only for one Cuban sand from a place called Santa Teresa (Pinar del Rio province). When pouring "revolving" sand on a flat surface from a fixed position, the growth of a ... Read »


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    • Shock diamond

    • Shock diamonds (also known as Mach diamonds, Mach disks, Mach rings, donut tails or thrust diamonds) are a formation of standing wave patterns that appear in the supersonic exhaust plume of an aerospace propulsion system, such as a supersonic jet engine, rocket, ramjet, or scramjet, when it is operated in an atmosphere ... Read »


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    • Shower-curtain effect

    • In physics, the shower-curtain effect is the phenomenon in which a shower curtain gets blown inward with a running shower. The problem of the cause of this effect has been featured in Scientific American magazine, with several theories given to explain the phenomenon but no definite conclusion. As a second meaning, the ... Read »


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    • Singing sand

    • Singing sand, also called whistling sand or barking sand, is sand that produces sound. The sound emission may be caused by wind passing over dunes or by walking on the sand. Certain conditions have to come together to create singing sand: The most common frequency emitted seems to be close to 450 Hz. There are vario ... Read »


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    • Stark effect

    • The Stark effect is the shifting and splitting of spectral lines of atoms and molecules due to presence of an external electric field. The amount of splitting or shifting is called the Stark splitting or Stark shift. In general, one distinguishes first- and second-order Stark effects. The first-order effect is linear i ... Read »


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    • Thermo-dielectric effect

    • The thermo-dielectric effect is the production of electric currents and charge separation during phase transition. This interesting effect was discovered by Joaquim da Costa Ribeiro in 1944. The Brazilian physicist observed that solidification and melting of many dielectrics are accompanied by charge separation. A the ... Read »


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    • Thermoelectric effect

    • The thermoelectric effect is the direct conversion of temperature differences to electric voltage and vice versa. A thermoelectric device creates voltage when there is a different temperature on each side. Conversely, when a voltage is applied to it, it creates a temperature difference. At the atomic scale, an applied ... Read »


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    • Tyndall effect

    • The Tyndall effect, also known as Tyndall scattering, is light scattering by particles in a colloid or else particles in a very fine suspension. It is named after the 19th-century physicist John Tyndall. It is similar to Rayleigh scattering, in that the intensity of the scattered light depends on the fourth power of th ... Read »


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    • Upstream contamination

    • Upstream contamination by floating particles is a counterintuitive phenomenon in fluid dynamics. When pouring water from a higher container to a lower one, particles floating in the latter can climb upstream into the upper container. A definitive explanation is still lacking: experimental and computational evidence ind ... Read »


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    • Wigner effect

    • The Wigner effect (named for its discoverer, Eugene Wigner), also known as the discomposition effect or Wigner's Disease, is the displacement of atoms in a solid caused by neutron radiation. Any solid can be affected by the Wigner effect. The effect is of most concern in neutron moderators, such as graphite, intended ... Read »


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    • Zeeman energy

    • Zeeman energy, or the external field energy, is the potential energy of a magnetised body in an external magnetic field. It is named after the Dutch physicist Pieter Zeeman, primarily known by the Zeeman effect. In SI units, it is given by where HExt is the external field, M the local magnetisation, and the integral i ... Read »


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