Main

  • Occupational safety and health

    Occupational safety and health

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Occupational safety and health

    • Category:Environmental health

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Environmental health


      Wikipedia
    • Agricultural health and safety

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Agricultural health and safety


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational safety and health awards

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Occupational safety and health awards


      Wikipedia
    • Chemical safety

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Chemical safety


      Wikipedia
    • Construction safety

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Construction safety


      Wikipedia
    • Deaths from laboratory accidents

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Deaths from laboratory accidents


      Wikipedia
    • Electrical safety

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Electrical safety


      Wikipedia
    • Environmental law

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Environmental law


      Wikipedia
    • Environmental toxicology

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Environmental toxicology


      Wikipedia
    • Ergonomics

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ergonomics


      Wikipedia
    • Factory inspectors

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Factory inspectors


      Wikipedia
    • Globally Harmonized System

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Globally Harmonized System


      Wikipedia
    • Hazard analysis

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Hazard analysis


      Wikipedia
    • Human reliability

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Human reliability


      Wikipedia
    • Industrial accidents and incidents

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Industrial accidents and incidents


      Wikipedia
    • Industrial hygiene

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Industrial hygiene


      Wikipedia
    • Industrial safety devices

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Industrial safety devices


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational safety and health journals

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Occupational safety and health journals


      Wikipedia
    • Laser safety and standards

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Laser safety and standards


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational safety and health law

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Occupational safety and health law


      Wikipedia
    • Members of Trinity House

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Members of Trinity House


      Wikipedia
    • Mine safety

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Mine safety


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational diseases

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Occupational diseases


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational safety and health organizations

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Occupational safety and health organizations


      Wikipedia
    • Space medicine

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Space medicine


      Wikipedia
    • STDs in the sex industry

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about STDs in the sex industry


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational therapy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Occupational therapy


      Wikipedia
    • Toxicology

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Toxicology


      Wikipedia
    • Underwater diving safety

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Underwater diving safety


      Wikipedia
    • Health and safety in the United Kingdom

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Health and safety in the United Kingdom


      Wikipedia
    • Welding safety

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Welding safety


      Wikipedia
    • Work–life balance


    • Occupational safety and health

    • Occupational safety and health (OSH), also commonly referred to as occupational health and safety (OHS), occupational health, or workplace health and safety (WHS), is a multidisciplinary field concerned with the safety, health, and welfare of people at work. These terms of course also refer to the goals of this field, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Agricultural safety and health

    • Agricultural safety and health is an aspect of occupational safety and health in the agricultural workplace. It specifically addresses the health and safety of farmers, farm workers, and their families. The agriculture industry is one of the most dangerous occupations and has led to thousands of deaths due to work ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

    • American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine is a United States-based professional society which promotes health care professionals in the field of occupational safety and health. In the early 1990s the ACOEM expressed concern about a shortage of physicians in its field. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Asbestos

    • Asbestos

      Asbestos is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals, which all have in common their eponymous asbestiform habit: long (roughly 1:20 aspect ratio), thin fibrous crystals, with each visible fiber composed of millions of microscopic "fibrils" that can be released by abrasion and other processes. They are common ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Asbestos and the law

    • Litigation related to asbestos injuries and property damages has been claimed to be the longest-running mass tort in U.S. history. Since asbestos-related disease has been identified by the medical profession in the late 1920s, workers' compensation cases were filed and resolved in secrecy, with a flood of litigation st ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Asbestos and the law (United States)

    • Abestos and the law (United States) have a complex relationship. The use of asbestos is controlled via civil litigation, criminal prosecution, and legislation at all levels of government, and administrative regulation. Mass torts have become central to the way that American law deals with asbestos. The Manville Co ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Asbestos-related diseases

    • Asbestos-related diseases

      Asbestos-related diseases are disorders of the lung and pleura caused by the inhalation of asbestos fibres. Asbestos-related diseases include non-malignant disorders such as asbestosis (pulmonary fibrosis due to asbestos), diffuse pleural thickening, pleural plaques, pleural effusion, rounded atelectasis and malignanci ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Association of Certifying Factory Surgeons

    • The Association of Certifying Factory Surgeons was founded in 1888 and was based in Manchester, with branches in other cities. Certifying surgeons were first appointed under the Factory Act of 1833 which required that a child between the ages of nine and eleven required a certificate from a doctor stating that they we ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • B reader

    • A "B" reader is a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) as demonstrating proficiency in classifying radiographs of the pneumoconioses. In 1974, after studies of surveillance programs for coal miners revealed unacceptable degrees of reader variability, NIOSH began ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Basic Occupational Health Services

    • The Basic Occupational Health Services are an application of the primary health care principles in the sector of occupational health. Primary health care definition can be found in the World Health Organization Alma Ata declaration from the year 1978 as the “essential health care based on practical scientifically ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Benzene

    • Benzene

      Benzene is an important organic chemical compound with the chemical formula C6H6. The benzene molecule is composed of 6 carbon atoms joined in a ring with 1 hydrogen atom attached to each. Because it contains only carbon and hydrogen atoms, benzene is classed as a hydrocarbon. Benzene is a natural constituent of crude ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Beryllium

    • Beryllium,  4Be

      Beryllium is a chemical element with symbol Be and atomic number 4. It is a relatively rare element in the universe, usually occurring as a product of the spallation of larger atomic nuclei that have collided with cosmic rays. Within the cores of stars beryllium is depleted as it is fused and creates larger elements. I ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Bleed air

    • Bleed air produced by gas turbine engines is compressed air that is taken from the compressor stage of those engines, which is upstream of the fuel-burning sections. In modern airliner engines, two regulator valves (high stage and low stage) turn on and off automatically and are controlled by at least "...two air suppl ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cadmium

    • Cadmium,  48Cd

      Cadmium is a chemical element with symbol Cd and atomic number 48. This soft, bluish-white metal is chemically similar to the two other stable metals in group 12, zinc and mercury. Like zinc, it demonstrates oxidation state +2 in most of its compounds, and like mercury, it has a lower melting point than other transitio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Canadian Registered Safety Professional

    • The Canadian Registered Safety Professional (CRSP)/ Professionnel en sécurité agréé du Canada (PSAC) is a certification offered by the Board of Canadian Registered Safety Professionals for an Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) professional. The CRSP/PSAC is accredited in Canada to ISO 17024 by the Standar ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cancer

    • Cancer

      Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. Not all tumors are cancerous; benign tumors do not spread to other parts of the body. Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss an ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • CANOSH

    • CANOSH is a web portal of links to Canadian occupational health and safety information that is provided by federal, provincial and territorial government agencies, Workers' Compensation Boards and the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS). The information is organized by jurisdiction and is availa ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Carbonless copy paper

    • Carbonless copy paper (CCP), non-carbon copy paper, or NCR paper (No Carbon Required, taken from the initials of its creator, National Cash Register) is a type of coated paper designed to transfer information written on the front onto sheets beneath. It was developed by chemists Lowell Schleicher and Barry Green, as an ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Causes of cancer

    • Most cancers are related to environmental, lifestyle, or behavioral exposures. The term "environmental", as used by cancer researchers, refers to everything outside the body that interacts with humans. In this sense, the environment is not limited to the biophysical environment (e.g. exposure to factors such as air pol ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Certified safety professional

    • The Certified Safety Professional (CSP) is a certification offered by the Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP). The CSP is accredited in the United States by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies and internationally by the International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Chemical accident

    • A chemical accident is the unintentional release of one or more hazardous substances which could harm human health or the environment. Chemical hazards are systems where chemical accidents could occur under certain circumstances. Such events include fires, explosions, leakages or releases of toxic or hazardous material ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Chemical hazard

    • A chemical hazard is a type of occupational hazard caused by exposure to chemicals in the workplace. Exposure to chemicals in the workplace can cause acute or long-term detrimental health effects. There are many types of hazardous chemicals, including neurotoxins, immune agents, dermatologic agents, carcinogens, reprod ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Chemical protective clothing

    • Chemical protective clothing (CPC) is clothing worn to shield those who work with chemicals from the effects of chemical hazards that can cause injuries on the job. It provides a last line of defense for chemical safety; it does not replace more proactive measures like engineering controls. There are some consideratio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Chilean Safety Association

    • The Chilean Safety Association (Spanish: Asociación Chilena de Seguridad, also known as ACHS) is a Chilean private non-profit organization, focused in development of risk prevention programs, and occupational accidents coverage. ACHS was created on November 13, 1957, after Ladislao Lira presented a project to the D ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Chlorine

    • Chlorine,  17Cl

      Chlorine is a chemical element with symbol Cl and atomic number 17. The second-lightest of the halogens, it appears between fluorine and bromine in the periodic table and its properties are mostly intermediate between them. Chlorine is a yellow-green gas at room temperature. It is an extremely reactive element an ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Chromium

    • Chromium,  24Cr

      Chromium is a chemical element with symbol Cr and atomic number 24. It is the first element in Group 6. It is a steely-grey, lustrous, hard and brittle metal which takes a high polish, resists tarnishing, and has a high melting point. The name of the element is derived from the Greek word χρῶμα, chrÅ ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Closed system drug transfer device

    • A closed system drug transfer device or "CSTD" is a drug transfer device that mechanically prohibits the transfer of environmental contaminants into a system and the escape of hazardous drug or vapor concentrations outside the system. In response to the initial reports of occupationally linked cancer within the sc ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • CLP Regulation

    • The CLP Regulation (for "Classification, Labelling and Packaging") is a European Union regulation from 2008, which aligns the European Union system of classification, labelling and packaging of chemical substances and mixtures to the Globally Harmonised System (GHS). It is expected to facilitate global trade and the ha ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Code of safe working practices

    • The Code of Safe Working Practices (COSWP) is published by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) of the UK. The code details the regulatory framework for health and safety aboard ship, safety management and statutory duties underlying to the advice in the code and the areas that should be covered when introducing a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Comcare

    • Comcare is a statutory authority of the Australian Federal Government established under the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (SRC Act) and covered by the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act). Comcare administers the Commonwealth's workers' compensation scheme under the SRC Act; and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Community resilience

    • Community resilience is the sustained ability of a community to utilize available resources (e.g. energy, communication, food, etc.) to respond to, withstand, and recover from adverse situations (e.g. economic collapse to global catastrophic risks. This allows for the evolution and growth of a community after disaster ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Compensation scheme for radiation-linked diseases

    • The Compensation scheme for radiation-linked diseases is a workers compensation scheme administered by the UK government. It was established in November 1982 by British Nuclear Fuels Limited and its trade unions following legal actions brought against the company by nuclear industry workers in the late 1970s. At the ti ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Confined space

    • A confined space is an enclosed area with limited space and accessibility. An example is the interior of a storage tank, which may be occasionally entered by workers for maintenance but is otherwise not a habitable space. Hazards in a confined space often include harmful dust or gases, asphyxiation, submersion in liqui ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Construction site safety

    • Construction work is a dangerous land-based job. Some construction site jobs include: building houses, roads, workplaces and repair and maintain infrastructures. This work includes many hazardous task and conditions such as working with height, excavation, noise, dust, power tools and equipment. The most common fatalit ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Control banding

    • Control banding is a qualitative or semi-quantitative risk assessment and management approach to promoting occupational health and safety. It is intended to minimize worker exposures to hazardous chemicals and other risk factors in the workplace and to help small businesses by providing an easy-to-understand, practical ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cytotoxic hazard symbol

    • The Cytotoxic hazard symbol is a triangle with the letter "C" inside it and is used to label biomedical waste bags and containers. The symbol is generally used as a warning, so that those potentially exposed to the substances will know to take precautions. Cytotoxic waste, the by-product of cytotoxic drug therapy admi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dangerous Goods Safety Advisor

    • A Dangerous Goods Safety Advisor (DGSA) is a consultant or an owner or employee of an organization appointed by an organization that transports, loads, or unloads dangerous goods in the European Union and other countries. This include 48 countries : Albania, Andorra, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dead man's switch


    • Defensible space (fire control)

    • Defensible Space, (sometimes called 'firescaping'), in the context of fire control, is a natural and/or landscaped area, around a structure, that has been maintained and designed to reduce fire danger. The practice is sometimes called 'Firescaping'. "Defensible space" is also used in the context of wildfires, especiall ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Contact dermatitis

    • Contact dermatitis

      Contact dermatitis is a type of inflammation of the skin. It results from either exposure to allergens (allergic contact dermatitis) or irritants (irritant contact dermatitis). Phototoxic dermatitis occurs when the allergen or irritant is activated by sunlight. Diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis can often be sup ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Diacetyl

    • Diacetyl

      Diacetyl (IUPAC systematic name: butanedione or butane-2,3-dione) is an organic compound with the chemical formula (CH3CO)2. It is a yellow/green liquid with an intensely buttery flavor. It is a vicinal diketone (two C=O groups, side-by-side) with the molecular formula C4H6O2. Diacetyl occurs naturally in alcoholic bev ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Diamond plate

    • Diamond plate, also known as checker plate, tread plate and Durbar floor plate, is a type of metal stock with a regular pattern of raised diamonds or lines on one side, with the reverse side being featureless. Diamond plate is usually steel, stainless steel or aluminum. Steel types are normally made by hot rolling, alt ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane

    • 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane

      1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane, (dibromochloropropane) better known as DBCP, is the active ingredient in the nematicide Nemagon, also known as Fumazone. It is a soil fumigant formerly used in American agriculture. In mammals it causes male sterility at high levels of exposure. After discovery of its deleterious health ef ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dry cleaning

    • Dry cleaning is any cleaning process for clothing and textiles using a chemical solvent other than water. It is used to clean fabrics that degrade in water, and delicate fabrics that cannot withstand the rough and tumble of a washing machine and clothes dryer. It can eliminate labor-intensive hand washing. Unlike what ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Earthquake preparedness

    • Earthquake preparedness is a set of measures taken at the individual, organisational and societal level to minimise the effects of an earthquake. Preparedness measures can range from securing heavy objects, structural modifications and storing supplies, to having insurance, an emergency kit, and evacuation plans. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Effective safety training

    • Effective safety training is an unofficial phrase used to describe the training materials designed to teach occupational safety and health standards developed by the United States government labor organization, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA has produced many standards and regulations that a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Effects of overtime

    • Employees who work overtime hours can be have many different physical, mental, and social effects. Significant effects include stress, lack of free time, poor work-life balance, and health risks. Employee performance levels could also be lowered. Long work hours could lead to tiredness, fatigue, and lack of attentivene ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • EHS Today

    • EHS Today

      EHS Today is an award-winning occupational safety and health magazine. Published monthly by Penton Media, it is the leading US magazine for environmental, health and safety management professionals in the manufacturing, construction, and service sectors. EHS Today was first published in 1938 as Occupational Hazard ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Electric shock

    • Electric shock

      Electric shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the (human) body. Typically, the expression is used to describe an injurious exposure to electricity. It occurs upon contact of a (human) body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Electrically conducting yarn

    • An electrically conducting yarn is a yarn that conducts electricity. Conducting yarns are used to manufacture carpets and other items that dissipate static electricity, such as work clothes in highly flammable environments, e.g., in the petrochemistry industry. There are several methods known to manufacture electrica ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Emergency management

    • Disaster management (or emergency management) is the creation of plans through which communities reduce vulnerability to hazards and cope with disasters. Disaster management does not avert or eliminate the threats; instead, it focuses on creating plans to decrease the effect of disasters. Failure to create a plan could ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance

    • Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance (ERHMS) is a health monitoring and surveillance framework developed by the National Response Team, an organization of 15 federal departments and agencies responsible for coordinating emergency preparedness and response. The framework includes recommendations, guide ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Employee assistance program

    • An employee assistance program (EAP) is an employee benefit program that assists employees with personal problems and/or work-related problems that may impact their job performance, health, mental and emotional well-being. EAPs generally offer free and confidential assessments, short-term counseling, referrals, and fol ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program

    • The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) was passed in 2000 and is designed to compensate individuals who worked in nuclear weapons production and as a result of occupational exposures contracted certain illnesses. The law was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on December 7, 2000. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Environment, health and safety

    • Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) is an umbrella term for the laws, rules, guidance and processes designed to help protect employees, the public and the environment from harm. In the workplace, the responsibilities for designing and implementing appropriate procedures is often assigned to a specific department, ofte ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Epidemiology data for low-linear energy transfer radiation

    • Epidemiological studies of the health effects of low levels of ionizing radiation, in particular the incidence and mortality from various forms of cancer, have been carried out in different population groups exposed to such radiation. These have included survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 194 ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ergonomic hazard

    • Ergonomic hazards are physical occupational conditions that may pose risk of injury to various parts of the musculoskeletal system, such as the muscles or ligaments of the lower back, tendons or nerves of the hands/wrists, or bones surrounding the knees. Ergonomic hazards include things such as awkward or extreme postu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ethylene oxide

    • Ethylene oxide

      Ethylene oxide, properly called oxirane by IUPAC, is the organic compound with the formula C 2H 4O. It is a cyclic ether. (A cyclic ether consists of an alkane with an oxygen atom bonded to two carbon atoms of the alkane, forming a ring.) Ethylene oxide is a colorless flammable gas at room temperature, with a faintly s ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Examinetics

    • Examinetics, Inc. is the largest provider of mobile and on-site occupational health screening and data management services in the United States. The company was established in 2004 following the consolidation of a number of small businesses providing occupational health screening and compliance services with over thirt ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Exposure action value

    • An Exposure Action Value (EAV) or Action Value (AV) is a limit set on occupational exposure to noise where, when those values are exceeded, employers must take steps to monitor the exposure levels. These levels are measured in decibels. The American Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) set the EAV to 85 ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Factories Act (Northern Ireland) 1965

    • Factories Act 1961

      The Factories Act 1961 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. At the time of its passage, the Act consolidated much legislation on workplace health, safety and welfare in Great Britain. Though as of 2008[update] some of it remains in force, it has largely been superseded by the Health and Safety at Work etc ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Fall protection

    • Fall protection is the use of controls designed to protect personnel from falling or in the event they do fall, to stop them without causing severe injury. Typically, fall protection is implemented when working at height, but may be relevant when working near any edge, such as near a pit or hole, or performing work on ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Falling (accident)

    • Falling (accident)

      Falling is the second leading cause of accidental death worldwide and is a major cause of personal injury, especially for the elderly.Falls in older adults are an important class of preventable injuries. Builders, electricians, miners, and painters are occupations with high rates of fall injuries. About 155 million ne ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952

    • The Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 is a U.S. law authorizing the federal government to conduct annual inspections of underground coal mines with more than 15 workers, and gave the United States Bureau of Mines the authority to shut down a mine in cases of "imminent danger." The Act authorized the assessment of ci ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • First aid room

    • A first aid room or medical room is a room in an establishment (e.g. a school, factory, sports venue or airport) to which someone who is injured or taken ill on the premises can be taken for first aid and to await the arrival of professional emergency medical services. According to guidance issued in 1981 in the UK, a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Flame arrester

    • A flame arrester (also spelled arrestor), deflagration arrester, or flame trap is a device that stops fuel combustion by extinguishing the flame. Flame arresters are used: They are commonly used on: A flame arrester (also called a deflagration arrester) functions by absorbing the heat from a flame front travelin ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Formaldehyde

    • Formaldehyde

      ButyraldehydeDecanalHeptanalHexanalNonanalOctadecanalOctanalPentanalPropionaldehyde Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring organic compound with the formula CH2O (H-CHO). It is the simplest of the aldehydes (R-CHO) and is also known by its systematic name methanal. The common name of this substance comes from its simil ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Gas leak

    • In common usage, a gas leak refers to a leak of natural gas or other gaseous product from a pipeline or other containment into a living area or any other area where the gas should not be present. Because flammable gases may explode when exposed to flame or sparks, this situation is very dangerous to the general public. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves

    • The Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves is a non-profit organization operating under the support of the United Nations Foundation. Their work focuses on improving health and environment through encouraging changes in cooking methods and types of stoves used in developing countries to pollute less and reduce indoor air ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Global road safety for workers

    • Worker road safety refers to the economic, societal, and legal ramifications of protecting workers from automobile-related injury, disability, and death. Road traffic crashes are a leading cause of occupational fatalities throughout the world, especially in developing countries. In addition to the suffering of the work ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Grain facility occupational exposure

    • Grain Facility Occupation Exposure is the quantifiable expression of workplace health and safety hazards a grain handling facility employee is vulnerable to in performing his/her assigned duties. Exposure represents the probability that a given hazard will have some level of effect of a receptor of interest. This page ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Guardian24

    • Guardian24

      Guardian24 Ltd are a UK based solution provider for the safety of lone workers throughout the UK and Ireland. The company was founded in Belfast, Northern Ireland in 1998. In 2000, Guardian24 developed the UK’s first lone worker support solution with a sole focus on protecting those who work alone from injury ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Alice Hamilton

    • External video

      Alice Hamilton (February 27, 1869 – September 22, 1970) was a leading expert in the field of occupational health and the first woman appointed to the faculty of Harvard University. She was a pioneer in the field of toxicology, studying occupational illnesses and the dangerous effects of industrial metals and chemi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hazard analysis

    • Note: Parts of this article are written from the perspective of aircraft safety analysis techniques and definitions; these may not represent current best practice and the article needs to be updated to represent a more generic description of hazard analysis and discussion of more modern standards and techniques. A haz ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hazard symbol

    • Hazard symbols or warning symbols are recognisable symbols designed to warn about hazardous materials, locations, or objects, including electric currents, poisons, and radioactivity. The use of hazard symbols is often regulated by law and directed by standards organisations. Hazard symbols may appear with different col ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hazards (magazine)

    • Hazards

      Hazards is an independent, award-winning occupational safety and health magazine. Published quarterly, it is the trade union recommended magazine for UK union health and safety representatives. Hazards has also jointly developed a NewsWire with LabourStart which provides health and safety news headlines for union websi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health and safety law

    • Health and safety law is a body of law that protects the health, safety and welfare of the general public and certain defined sectors of the population such as employees. Most jurisdictions have a framework of health and safety law which will usually be enforced by the state using an inspectorate, regulatory control an ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health hazards in semiconductor manufacturing occupations

    • Health hazards in semiconductor manufacturing occupations is an issue in occupational hygiene due to the chemical hazard encountered in the semiconductor industry. Health manifestations due to low level exposure to toxins may take decades to surface. A Scientific Advisory Committee funded by the Semiconductor Indust ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Healthy Entreprise

    • Healthy environment is a standard whose registrar is the Bureau de Normalisation du Québec. The standard aims to recognize companies that have implemented actions of workplace health promotion and workplace wellness. The standard has 5 main requirements : To be recognized a company has to act in at least two of ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hearing conservation program

    • Hearing conservation programs are designed to prevent noise induced hearing loss. A written hearing conservation program is required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) "whenever employee noise exposures equal or exceed an 8-hour time-weighted average sound level (TWA) of 85 decibels measured on ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hearing loss

    • Hearing loss

      Hearing loss, also known as hearing impairment, is a partial or total inability to hear. A deaf person has little to no hearing. Hearing loss may occur in one or both ears. In children hearing problems can affect the ability to learn spoken language and in adults it can cause work related difficulties. In some people, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Herbert William Heinrich

    • Herbert William Heinrich (1886 – June 22, 1962 ) was an American industrial safety pioneer from the 1930s. He was an Assistant Superintendent of the Engineering and Inspection Division of Travelers Insurance Company when he published his book Industrial Accident Prevention, A Scientific Approach in 1931. One empir ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Helicopter Underwater Escape Training

    • Helicopter Underwater Egress Training in the United States, and Helicopter Underwater Escape Training in most other countries, (often abbreviated HUET, pronounced hue-wet, hue-way or you-way) is training provided to helicopter flight crews,offshore oil and gas industry staff law enforcement personnel, and military pers ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hexavalent chromium

    • Hexavalent chromium (chromium(VI), Cr(VI), chromium 6) refers to chemical compounds that contain the element chromium in the +6 oxidation state. Virtually all chromium ore is processed via hexavalent chromium, specifically the salt sodium dichromate. Approximately 136,000 tonnes (300,000,000 lb) of hexavalent chromi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hierarchy of hazard control

    • Hierarchy of hazard control is a system used in industry to minimize or eliminate exposure to hazards. It is a widely accepted system promoted by numerous safety organizations. This concept is taught to managers in industry, to be promoted as standard practice in the workplace. Various illustrations are used to depict ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hot work

    • Hot work is a process that can be a source of ignition when flammable material is present or can be a fire hazard regardless of the presence of flammable material in the . Common hot work processes involve welding, soldering, cutting, brazing burning and the use of powder-actuated tools or similar fire producing operat ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Human factors and ergonomics

    • Human factors and ergonomics (commonly referred to as HF&E), also known as comfort design, functional design, and systems, is the practice of designing products, systems, or processes to take proper account of the interaction between them and the people who use them. The field has seen some contributions from numerous ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Human Factors in Engineering and Design

    • Human Factors in Engineering and Design

      Human Factors in Engineering and Design is an engineering textbook, currently in its seventh edition. The book, first published in 1957, is considered a classic in human factors and ergonomics, and one of the best-established texts in the field. It is frequently taught in upper-level and graduate courses in the U.S., a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Donald Hunter (physician)

    • Donald Hunter CBE FRCP (11 February 1898 – 11 December 1978) was a British physician and author of a classic text on occupational medicine, The Diseases of Occupations. Hunter was born in the East End of London. His father was George Hunter, a deputy engineer in the General Post Office. He entered The London Hosp ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Impact of nanotechnology

    • The impact of nanotechnology extends from its medical, ethical, mental, legal and environmental applications, to fields such as engineering, biology, chemistry, computing, materials science, and communications. Major benefits of nanotechnology include improved manufacturing methods, water purification systems, energy ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Indicative limit value

    • In the law of the European Union, indicative limit values, more exactly indicative occupational exposure limit values (IOELVs), are human exposure limits to hazardous substances specified by the Council of the European Union based on expert research and advice. They are not binding on member states but must be taken i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Indoor air quality

    • Indoor air quality (IAQ) is a term which refers to the air quality within and around buildings and structures, especially as it relates to the health and comfort of building occupants. IAQ can be affected by gases (including carbon monoxide, radon, volatile organic compounds), particulates, microbial contaminants (mold ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Indoor Environmental Quality Global Alliance

    • The Indoor Environmental Quality Global Alliance (IEQ-GA) was initiated in 2014 aiming to improve the actual, delivered indoor environmental quality in buildings through coordination, education, outreach and advocacy. The alliance works to supply information, guidelines and knowledge on the indoor environmental qualit ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Industrial noise

    • Industrial noise, or occupational noise, is often a term used in relation to environmental health and safety, rather than nuisance, as sustained exposure can cause permanent hearing damage. Industrial noise or occupational noise is the amount of acoustical energy (noise) received by an employees auditory system while t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Inhalation exposure

    • Inhalation is a major route of exposure that occurs when an individual breathes in polluted air which enters the respiratory tract. Identification of the pollutant uptake by the respiratory system can determine how the resulting exposure contributes to the dose. In this way, the mechanism of pollutant uptake by the res ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Job safety analysis

    • A job safety analysis (JSA) is a procedure which helps integrate accepted safety and health principles and practices into a particular task or job operation. In a JSA, each basic step of the job is to identify potential hazards and to recommend the safest way to do the job. Other terms used to describe this procedure a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Job strain

    • Job strain is a form of psychosocial stress that occurs in the workplace. One of the most common forms of stress, it is characterized by a combination of high demands and low levels of control regarding one's job. A 2012 meta-analysis found a positive association between job strain and coronary heart disease risk. A 2 ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Jury stress

    • Jury stress or juror stress is physical and mental that affects members of juries. Its causes include "exhaustion, sequestration, the mountain of evidence, and the desire to do the right thing." ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Robert A. Kehoe

    • Robert A. Kehoe (November 18, 1893 – November 24, 1992) was an American toxicologist and leader in occupational health. Kehoe was the foremost medical apologist for the use of tetraethyllead as an additive in gasoline. Kehoe was born in Georgetown, Ohio, on November 18, 1893 to Jeremiah and Jessie Kehoe. Rob ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Kissing the shuttle

    • "Kissing the shuttle" is the term for a process by which weavers used their mouths to pull thread through the eye of a shuttle when the pirn was replaced. The same shuttles were used by many weavers, and the practice was unpopular. It was outlawed in the U.S. state of Massachusetts in 1911 but continued even after it h ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Kazutaka Kogi

    • Kazutaka Kogi (born 1933) is a Japanese academic known for his contributions to simple, low-cost interventions in small manufacturing enterprises that improve the working conditions for the employees and at the same time also improve the overall productivity of the workforce. The interventions are based on simple and l ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Laboratory safety

    • Many laboratories contain significant risks, and the prevention of laboratory accidents requires great care and constant vigilance. Examples of risk factors include high voltages, high and low pressures and temperatures, corrosive and toxic chemicals, and biohazards including infective organisms and their toxins. Meas ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Joseph LaDou

    • Joseph LaDou (born 1938) is an occupational and environmental medicine physician and founding editor of the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health. From 1992 to 2005, he was director of the International Center for Occupational Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He is curre ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Latex allergy

    • Latex allergy

      Latex allergy is a medical term encompassing a range of allergic reactions to the proteins present in natural rubber latex. Latex allergy generally develops after repeated exposure to products containing natural rubber latex. When latex-containing medical devices or supplies come in contact with mucous membranes, the m ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lead

    • Lead,  82Pb

      Lead (/lɛd/), from the Old English léad, is a chemical element with atomic number 82 and symbol Pb (after the Latin, plumbum). It has the second highest atomic number of all practically stable elements. As such, lead is located at the end of some decay chains of heavier elements, which in part accounts for ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lead safe work practices

    • Mandated by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) standard 24 CFR Part 1330 (a) (4), Lead-Safe Work Practices provide those performing remodeling tasks in homes built before 1978 with guidelines on procedures they should be using to prevent creating a lead hazard. Lead poisoning remains a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lift table bellows

    • A lift table bellows (also known as lift table skirting) is a safety device that forms a protective barrier between the lift table operator and the equipment's moving parts. The protective barrier is constructed from a wide range of material with 23oz vinyl being the most common in industrial applications. The pu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Light curtain

    • Safety Light curtains are opto-electronic devices that are used to safeguard personnel in the vicinity of moving machinery with the potential to cause harm such as presses, winders and palletisers. Safety Light curtains can be used as an alternative to mechanical barriers and other forms of traditional machine guarding ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of R-phrases

    • R-phrases (short for Risk Phrases) are defined in Annex III of European Union Directive 67/548/EEC: Nature of special risks attributed to dangerous substances and preparations. The list was consolidated and republished in Directive 2001/59/EC, where translations into other EU languages may be found. These risk phrases ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of S-phrases

    • S-phrases are defined in Annex IV of European Union Directive 67/548/EEC: Safety advice concerning dangerous substances and preparations. The list was consolidated and republished in Directive 2001/59/EC, where translations into other EU languages may be found. The list was subsequently updated and republished in Direc ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lockout-tagout

    • Lockout-tagout (LOTO) or lock and tag is a safety procedure which is used in industry and research settings to ensure that dangerous machines are properly shut off and not able to be started up again prior to the completion of maintenance or servicing work. It requires that hazardous energy sources be "isolated and ren ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • LOLI Database

    • The LOLI Database, also known as the The Registered Chemicals List of Lists is an international chemical regulatory database developed and maintained by ChemADVISOR, Inc. The LOLI database is one of the primary sources of information for the creation of safety data sheets and other hazard communication documents. The ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lone worker monitoring

    • Lone worker monitoring is the practice of monitoring the safety of employees who may be exposed to risk due to work conditions in which they are located out of sight and sound from a person who may be able to offer aid in the event of an emergency. In some areas including the United Kingdom Australian States and c ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • LTIFR

    • LTIFR refers to Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate, the number of lost time injuries occurring in a workplace per 1 million man-hours worked. An LTIFR of 7, for example, shows that 7 lost time injuries occur on a jobsite every 1 million man-hours worked. The formula gives a picture of how safe a workplace is for its worke ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Manganese

    • Manganese,  25Mn

      Manganese is a chemical element with symbol Mn and atomic number 25. It is not found as a free element in nature; it is often found in minerals in combination with iron. Manganese is a metal with important industrial metal alloy uses, particularly in stainless steels. Historically, manganese is named for various black ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Manual handling of loads

    • Manual handling of loads (MHL), manual material handling (MMH) involves the use of the human body to lift, lower, fill, empty, or carry loads. The load can be animate (a person or animal) or inanimate (an object). Most manufacturing or distribution systems require some manual handling tasks. Though decreasing lately, t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Maquila Decree

    • The Maquila Decree, established in 1989, lays out the legal requirements for foreign operations in Mexico. As described by the Bancomext Mexican Showroom, an organization to promote foreign investment in Mexico, this program allows foreign companies to build and operate factories in virtually any Mexican location of th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mercury (element)

    • Mercury,  80Hg

      Mercury is a chemical element with symbol Hg and atomic number 80. It is commonly known as quicksilver and was formerly named hydrargyrum (/haɪˈdrɑːrdʒərəm/). A heavy, silvery d-block element, mercury is the only metallic element that is liquid at standard conditions for temperature and pressure; t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mine safety

    • Safety has long been a concern in the mining business, especially in underground mining. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, involved the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France on March 10, 1906. This disaster was surpassed only by the Benxihu Colliery accident in China on April 26, 1942, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mining

    • Mining is extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth usually from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposits. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mold indoor growth, assessment, and remediation

    • Mold (American English) or mould (British English) is part of the natural environment. Outdoors, molds play a part in nature by breaking down dead organic matter such as fallen leaves and dead trees; indoors, mold growth should be avoided. Molds reproduce by means of tiny spores. The spores are invisible to the naked e ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mold health issues

    • Mold health issues are potentially harmful effects of molds. Molds (US usage; British English "moulds") are ubiquitous in the biosphere, and mold spores are a common component of household and workplace dust. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in its June 2006 report, 'Mold Preventio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mr. Ouch

    • Mr. Ouch is a hazard symbol developed by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) to represent electrical hazards. Unlike other high-voltage warning symbols, Mr. Ouch was specifically designed with young children in mind. Mr. Ouch is similar in name, purpose, and appearance to the Children's Hospital o ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health

    • The National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) was established under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to advise the Secretaries of Labor and Health and Human Services on occupational safety and health programs and policies. Members of the twelve-person advisory committee are ch ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National Agricultural Safety Database

    • The National Ag Safety Database (NASD) was developed with funding from the United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the USDA Cooperative Extension Service (CES). The information contained in NASD was contributed by safety profess ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National Day of Mourning (Canadian observance)

    • The National Day of Mourning, or Workers’ Mourning Day is observed in Canada on 28 April. It commemorates workers who have been killed, injured or suffered illness due to workplace related hazards and incidents. Workers' Memorial Day was started in Sudbury, Ontario in 1984, and the Canadian Labour Congress offici ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National Farm Safety & Health Week


    • National Fire Fighter Near-Miss Reporting System

    • The National Fire Fighter Near-Miss Reporting System was launched on August 12, 2005 by the International Association of Fire Chiefs. It was announced at a press conference in Denver, Colorado, after having completed a pilot program involving 38 fire departments across the country. The Near-Miss Reporting System aims t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Neil George Safety System

    • The Neil George Safety System (or 5-Point Safety System) is an occupational health and safety program developed, used in underground mining. The system was developed in 1942 by Canadian engineer Neil George, who at the time was an employee of Inco Limited in Sudbury, Ontario. The program is used throughout Canada and i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • North American Occupational Safety and Health Week

    • North American Occupational Safety and Health (NAOSH) week is held every year during the first full week of May to raise awareness about occupational safety, health and the environment (SH&E) in an effort to prevent work injuries and illnesses. The American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) partners with the Canadian ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Nutec

    • Nutec AS is a Norwegian company working with security and preparedness for emergency exits, fire on oil rigs. Among the activities are education for oil rig workers. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational burnout

    • Burnout is a type of psychological stress. Occupational burnout or job burnout is characterized by exhaustion, lack of enthusiasm and motivation, feelings of ineffectiveness, and also may have the dimension of frustration or cynicism, and as a result reduced efficacy within the workplace. The term burnout in psycholog ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational cardiovascular disease

    • Occupational cardiovascular disease is disease of the heart or blood vessels that are caused by working conditions, making them a form of occupational illness. Little is known about occupational risks for heart disease, but links have been established between cardiovascular disease and certain toxins (including carbon ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational dust exposure

    • Occupational dust exposure can occur in various settings, including agriculture, forestry, and mining. Dust hazards include those that arise from handling grain and cotton, as well as from mining coal. Without proper safety precautions, dust exposure can lead to occupational lung diseases. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational epidemiology

    • Occupational epidemiology is one of the sub-disciplines of epidemiology that focus on investigations on workers and the workplace. Occupational epidemiologic studies examine a variety of health outcomes among workers and their potential association with a variety of conditions in the workplace (such as noise, chemical ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational exposure limit

    • An occupational exposure limit is an upper limit on the acceptable concentration of a hazardous substance in workplace air for a particular material or class of materials. It is typically set by competent national authorities and enforced by legislation to protect occupational safety and health. It is an important tool ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational fatality

    • An occupational fatality is a death that occurs while a person is at work or performing work related tasks. Occupational fatalities are also commonly called “occupational deaths” or “work-related deaths/fatalities” and can occur in any industry or occupation. Common causes of occupational fatal ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational hazard

    • Occupational hazard

      Occupational Hazard is Unsane's fourth studio album, released on January 27, 1998 through Relapse Records. The song "Committed" is featured on the Tony Hawk's Pro Skater soundtrack. Bake Butler from Allmusic described the album as "getting hit by a semi, kicked in the teeth, and thrown down three flights of stairs ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational health nursing

    • Occupational health nursing is a specialty nursing practice that provides for and delivers health and safety programs and services to workers, worker populations, and community groups. The practice focuses on promotion, maintenance and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, and protection from workâ ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational health psychology

    • Occupational health psychology (OHP) is an interdisciplinary area of psychology that is concerned with the health and safety of workers. OHP addresses a number of major topic areas including the impact of occupational stressors on physical and mental health, the impact of involuntary unemployment on physical and mental ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational hearing loss

    • Occupational hearing loss (OHL) is hearing loss that occurs as a result of occupational hazards. OHL, damage to one or both ears from exposures related to one's occupation, is a large but preventable problem. Organizations such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Institute for O ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational heat stress

    • Occupational heat stress is the net load to which a worker is exposed from the combined contributions of metabolic heat, environmental factors, and clothing worn which results in an increase in heat storage in the body. Heat stress can result in heat-related illnesses, such as heat stroke (hyperthermia), heat exhaustio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational hygiene

    • Occupational (or "industrial" in the U.S.) hygiene (IH) is the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, control and prevention of hazards from work that may result in injury, illness, or affect the well being of workers. These hazards or stressors are typically divided into the categories biological, chemical, physical, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational injury

    • An occupational injury is bodily damage resulting from working. The most common organs involved are the spine, hands, the head, lungs, eyes, skeleton, and skin. Occupational injuries can result from exposure to occupational hazards (physical, chemical, biological, or psychosocial), such as temperature, noise, insect or ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational medicine

    • Occupational medicine, especially until 1960 called industrial medicine, is the branch of medicine which deals with the maintenance of health in the workplace, including the prevention and treatment of diseases and injuries, and also promotes productivity and social adjustment. It is thus the branch of clinical medici ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational rehabilitation

    • Occupational rehabilitation is the science and practices of returning injured workers to a level of work activity that is appropriate to their functional and cognitive capacity, both of which are influenced by the severity of a worker's injuries. Many workers have an increased risk of developing common mental diso ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational safety and health in Tanzania

    • Tanzania has a number of laws and regulations that govern occupational safety and health (OSH) protections for workers. The International Labour Organization reports that due to insufficient statistics and consistent reporting, it is impossible to determine the number of workplace accidents that occur in the country. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational Safety and Health Professional Day

    • Occupational Safety and Health Professional (OSHP) Day recognizes the efforts and commitment of occupational safety, health and environmental professionals to protect people, property and the environment. The American Society of Safety Engineers’ Board of Directors approved the creation of Occupational Safety and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational skin diseases

    • Occupational skin diseases are ranked among the top five occupational diseases in many countries. Contact Dermatitis due to irritation is inflammation of the skin which results from a contact with an irritant. It has been observed that this type of dermatitis does not require prior sensitization of the immune system. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational stress

    • Occupational stress is stress related to one's job. Occupational stress often stems from unexpected responsibilities and pressures that do not align with a person's knowledge, skills, or expectations, inhibiting one's ability to cope. Occupational stress can increase when workers do not feel supported by supervisors or ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Occupational toxicology

    • Occupational toxicology or Industrial toxicology is the application of the principles and methodology of toxicology to understanding and managing chemical and biological hazards encountered at work. The objective of the occupational toxicologist is to prevent adverse health effects in workers that arise from exposures ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Participatory ergonomics

    • Industrial Ergonomics programs seek to identify and correct factors that negatively impact the physical health of their workers. Participatory ergonomics programs seek to maximize the involvement of the workers in this process based on the simple fact that a worker is an expert on his or her job. The participatory appr ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Patient-initiated violence

    • Patient-initiated violence is a specific form of workplace violence that affects healthcare workers that is the result of verbal, physical, or emotional abuse from a patient or family members of whom they have assumed care. Nurses represent the highest percentage of affected workers however other roles include physicia ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Person–environment fit


    • Personal protective equipment

    • Personal protective equipment (PPE) refers to protective clothing, helmets, goggles, or other garments or equipment designed to protect the wearer's body from injury or infection. The hazards addressed by protective equipment include physical, electrical, heat, chemicals, biohazards, and airborne particulate matter. Pr ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Phenol-soluble modulin

    • Phenol-soluble modulins (PSM) are a family of protein toxins that are soluble in phenols, that are produced by CA-MRSA, and which are thought to be a possible cause of severe infections. PSM toxins are encoded by the genome meaning, unlike virulence genes encoded on mobile genetic elements, all species of Staphylococc ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Physical hazard

    • A physical hazard is a type of occupational hazard that involves environmental hazards that can cause harm with or without contact. Physical hazards include ergonomic hazards, radiation, heat and cold stress, vibration hazards, and noise hazards.Engineering controls are often used to mitigate physical hazards. Physica ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • PIACT

    • PIACT is an acronym for programme developed by the International Labor Organization for improvement of occupational health and safety. The acronym is derived from its French name Programme international pour l'amélioration des conditions et du milieu de travail (PIACT), but it is also widely known under its English ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • PIMEX

    • PIMEX is one of the so-called video exposure monitoring methods which are used in occupational hygiene practise since their introduction in the mid-1980s. The name PIMEX is an acronym from the words PIcture Mix EXposure, and implies that the method is based on mixing pictures, in this case from a video camera, with dat ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pointing and calling

    • Pointing and calling is a method in occupational safety for avoiding mistakes by pointing at important indicators and calling out the status. It is common in Japan and is sometimes referred to by its Japanese terms, shisa kanko (指差喚呼), shisa kakunin kanko (指差確認喚呼) or yu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Police officer safety and health

    • There are numerous issues affecting the safety and health of police officers, including line of duty deaths and occupational stress. Line of duty deaths are deaths which occur while an officer is conducting his or her appointed duties. Despite the increased risk of being a victim of a homicide, automobile accident ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Portable appliance testing

    • Portable appliance testing (commonly known as "PAT", "PAT Inspection" or (redundantly) as "PAT Testing") is the name of a process in the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand and Australia by which electrical appliances are routinely checked for safety. The formal term for the process is "in-service insp ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Positive psychology in the workplace

    • Implementing positive psychology in the workplace means creating an environment that is relatively enjoyable and productive. This also means creating a work schedule that does not lead to emotional and physical distress. According to information provided by The United States Department of Labor, “In 2009 empl ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Prevention through design

    • Prevention through design (PtD) is the concept of mitigating occupational hazards by "designing them out". This method for reducing workplace safety risks lessens workers' reliance on personal protective equipment. Each year in the U.S., 55,000 people die from work-related injuries and diseases, 294,000 are made sick, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Principles of motion economy

    • The principles of motion economy form a set of rules and suggestions to improve the manual work in manufacturing and reduce fatigue and unnecessary movements by the worker, which can lead to the reduction in the work related trauma. The principles of motion economy can be classified into four groups: ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Psychosocial hazard

    • A psychosocial hazard is any occupational hazard that affects the psychological well-being of workers, including their ability to participate in a work environment among other people. Psychosocial hazards are related to the way work is designed, organized and managed, as well as the economic and social contexts of work ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Quantitative risk assessment software

    • Quantitative risk assessment (QRA) software and methodologies give estimates of risks, given the parameters defining them. They are used in the financial sector, the chemical process industry, and other areas. In financial terms, quantitative risk assessments include a calculation of the single loss expectancy of mon ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Radiation dose reconstruction

    • Radiation dose reconstruction refers to the process of estimating radiation doses that were received by individuals or populations in the past as a result of particular exposure situations of concern. The basic principle of radiation dose reconstruction is to characterize the radiation environment to which individuals ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Radiation Exposure Compensation Act

    • Radiation Exposure Compensation Act

      The United States Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) is a federal statute providing for the monetary compensation of people, including atomic veterans, who contracted cancer and a number of other specified diseases as a direct result of their exposure to atmospheric nuclear testing undertaken by the United Stat ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Bernardino Ramazzini

    • Bernardino Ramazzini

      Bernardino Ramazzini (4 October 1633 – 5 November 1714) was an Italian physician. (Italian pronunciation: ['bernardino ramat'tsini]) Ramazzini, along with Francesco Torti, was an early proponent of the use of cinchona bark (from which quinine is derived) in the treatment of Malaria. His most important contributio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ramboll Environ

    • Ramboll Environ, Inc.

      Ramboll Environ, Inc., is a privately held, international environmental, safety and health sciences consulting firm headquartered in Arlington, Virginia. Formed by the December 2014 acquisition of ENVIRON by Danish-based Ramboll the firm has operations across 128 offices in 26 countries, with more than 2,100 consultant ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Risk and Safety Statements

    • Risk and Safety Statements, also known as R/S statements, R/S numbers, R/S phrases, and R/S sentences, is a system of hazard codes and phrases for labeling dangerous chemicals and compounds. The R/S statement of a compound consists of a risk part (R) and a safety part (S), each followed by a combination of numbers. Eac ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Risk Information Exchange

    • The Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) is an Internet database created in 2007 by Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA). The database provides in-progress and recently completed chemical risk assessments, and is open for anyone to upload relevant information. By allowing for user input of projects, RiskIE is ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Robens Report

    • Robens Report

      Alfred "Alf" Robens, Baron Robens of Woldingham, PC (18 December 1910 – 27 June 1999), was an English trade unionist, Labour politician and industrialist. His political ambitions, including an aspiration to become Prime Minister, were frustrated by bad timing; but his energies were diverted into industry: he spent ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Rope access

    • Rope access is a form of work positioning, initially developed from techniques used in climbing and caving, which applies practical ropework to allow workers to access difficult-to-reach locations without the use of scaffolding, cradles or an aerial work platform. Rope access technicians descend, ascend, and traverse ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Safe Work Procedure

    • The term Safe Work Procedure (SWP) originated in Victoria, Australia, and is predominantly used as a risk management tool by industries throughout Australia, particularly in the mining sector. SWPs are also referred to using other terms, such as Standard Operating Procedure (SOPre) (SOP). A Safe Work Procedure is a ste ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Safeguard (magazine)

    • Safeguard

      Safeguard is a New Zealand magazine devoted to occupational health and safety. It features articles and information on managing health and safety in the workplace and is aimed at employers in all industries and at health and safety professionals. The magazine was launched as a quarterly in 1988 by the Occupational Safe ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Safety data sheet

    • A safety data sheet (SDS),material safety data sheet (MSDS), or product safety data sheet (PSDS) is an important component of product stewardship, occupational safety and health, and spill-handling procedures. SDS formats can vary from source to source within a country depending on national requirements. SDSs are a wi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Safety Jackpot

    • Safety Jackpot is a commercially available gamecard based incentive program created in 1991 aimed at reducing workplace accidents. The program works by rewarding gamecards to employees for weekly safe behavior. The scratchoff gamecards reveal points which employees collect and redeem for merchandise items in the progra ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Safety statement

    • Safety statement is the name given to the document that outlines how a company manages their health and safety in the Republic of Ireland, based upon the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act, 2005. The requirement to have a written safety statement is outlined in Section 20 of the above Act, although it was also a re ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Send for Help Group

    • Send for Help Ltd

      Send for Help Group (founded in 2010) is the parent company of Skyguard Ltd and Guardian24 Ltd; two established lone worker protection providers. Send for Help Group was founded by James and William Murray in 2010 and backed by Jan Murray, the technology entrepreneur widely known for establishing PC World Plc in 1 ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • SENSOR-Pesticides

    • Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR)-Pesticides is a U.S. state-based surveillance program that monitors pesticide-related illness and injury. It is administered by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), twelve state health agencies participate. NIOSH provides t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Seoul Declaration on Safety and Health at Work

    • On June 29, 2008, the XVIII World Congress on Safety and Health at Work signed the Seoul Declaration on Safety and Health at Work. The declaration included statements concerning national governments' responsibility for perpetuating a "national preventative safety and health culture", for improving their national safe-w ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Sheri Sangji case

    • The Sheri Sangji case is the first criminal case resulting from an academic laboratory accident. The case arose from a fatal accident that occurred in the chemistry laboratory of Patrick Harran at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Research assistant Sheharbano "Sheri" Sangji suffered severe burns fro ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Sifa

    • Sifa or the deadman's control system is a safety device in a train intended to bring the train automatically to a stop if the driver becomes incapacitated. Sifa is short for Sicherheitsfahrschaltung, German for "safety driving switch". It is usually a pedal and/or large press button, which monitors the alertness o ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Sleeping while on duty

    • Sleeping while on duty or sleeping on the job refers to falling asleep while on the time clock or equivalent, or else while responsible for performing some active or passive job duty. While in some jobs, this is a minor transgression or not even worthy of sanctioning, in other workplaces, this is considered gross misco ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Specific inhalation challenge

    • The Specific Inhalation Challenge (SIC) is defined as a diagnosis tool to assess airway responsiveness to "sensitizing" substances as opposed to nonspecific stimuli such as pharmacological agents (i.e. histamine, methacholine), cold air and exercise. Subjects are exposed to a suspected occupational agent in a controlle ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • STDs in the porn industry

    • STDs in the porn industry deals with the outbreak of cases of transmission in the sex industry of sexually transmitted infections (STIs/STDs), especially HIV/AIDS, which became a major cause of concern since the 1980s, especially for pornographic film actors. As of 2009[update], there had been twenty-two reported HIV c ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • John Stoke (doctor)

    • John Charles Jamieson Stoke FFOM, FAFOM, FAFPHM, MCCM MBBS, DIH (1928–2000) was a pioneer in Occupational Medicine in New Zealand, with influence in the Asia/Pacific region. He was Director of Public Health in New Zealand from 1986 to 1987. Some of the details in this article are drawn from notes that he had made ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Substitution of dangerous chemicals

    • Substitution of hazardous chemicals in the working environment is a method to a fundamental and continued improvement of occupational health by selection and development of alternative technical processes using less hazardous chemicals or no chemicals at all. In a substitution the chemicals in the final situation must ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Thermal work limit

    • Thermal Work Limit (TWL) is defined as the limiting (or maximum) sustainable metabolic rate that well-hydrated, acclimatized individuals can maintain in a specific thermal environment, within a safe deep body core temperature (< 38.2 °C or 100.8 °F) and sweat rate (< 1.2 kg or 2.6 lb per hour). ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Threshold limit value

    • The threshold limit value (TLV) of a chemical substance is a level to which it is believed a worker can be exposed day after day for a working lifetime without adverse effects. Strictly speaking, TLV is a reserved term of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). TLVs issued by the ACGIH ar ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Total Worker Health

    • Total Worker Health is a trademarked strategy defined as policies, programs, and practices that integrate protection from work-related safety and health hazards with promotion of injury and illness prevention efforts to advance worker well-being. It was conceived and is funded by the National Institute for Occupational ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Voluntary Protection Program

    • Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP is an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) initiative that encourages private industry and federal agencies to prevent workplace injuries and illnesses through hazard prevention and control, worksite analysis, training; and cooperation between management and workers. V ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Wellbeing at Work conference

    • The International Wellbeing at Work (WAW) series of academic conferences is relatively new in the field of occupational safety and health. In 2014, it was hosted by NRCWE. WAW has been held biannually since 2010 and attracts researchers and practitioners of the field. WAW 2012 was held in Manchester, Great Britain and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Wet-bulb globe temperature

    • The wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) is a type of apparent temperature used to estimate the effect of temperature, humidity, wind speed (wind chill), and visible and infrared radiation (usually sunlight) on humans. It is used by industrial hygienists, athletes, and the military to determine appropriate exposure levels ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Wildfire

    • A wildfire or wildland fire is a fire in an area of combustible vegetation that occurs in the countryside or rural area. Depending on the type of vegetation where it occurs, a wildfire can also be classified more specifically as a brush fire, bush fire, desert fire, forest fire, grass fire, hill fire, peat fire, vegeta ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Wildfire suppression

    • Wildfire suppression is a range of firefighting tactics used to suppress wildfires. Firefighting efforts in wild land areas require different techniques, equipment, and training from the more familiar structure fire fighting found in populated areas. Working in conjunction with specially designed aerial firefighting ai ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Work accident

    • A work accident, workplace accident, occupational accident, or accident at work is a "discrete occurrence in the course of work" leading to physical or mental occupational injury. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), more than 337 million accidents happen on the job each year, resulting, together w ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    Wikipedia
  • What Else?

    • Occupational safety and health

Extras