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  • Naval architecture

    Naval architecture

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Naval architecture

    • Naval architects

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Naval architects


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    • Ship design

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ship design


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    • Ship measurements

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ship measurements


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    • Shipbuilding

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Shipbuilding


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    • Submarine design

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Submarine design


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    • Bilge

    • The bilge (IPA: /bɪldʒ/) is the lowest compartment on a ship or seaplane, below the waterline, where the two sides meet at the keel. The first known use of the word is from 1513. The word is sometimes also used to describe the water that collects in this area. Water that does not drain off the side of the de ... Read »


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    • Catamaran

    • A catamaran (/ˌkætəməˈræn/) (informally, a "cat") is a multi-hulled watercraft featuring two parallel hulls of equal size. It is a geometry-stabilized craft, deriving its stability from its wide beam, rather than from a ballasted keel as with a monohull sailboat. Being ballast-free and therefore light ... Read »


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    • Chine (boating)

    • A chine in boating refers to a sharp change in angle in the cross section of a hull. A hull without chines has a gradually curving cross section. The term hard chine indicates an angle with little rounding, where a soft chine would be more rounded, but still involve the meeting of distinct planes. Chine log constructio ... Read »


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    • Glossary of nautical terms

    • This is a partial glossary of nautical terms; some remain current, while many date from the 17th to 19th centuries. See also , Category:Nautical terms, and Nautical metaphors in English. See the Further reading section for additional words and references. Various measures of the size or cargo carrying capacity of a sh ... Read »


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    • Keel

    • On boats and ships, keel can refer to either of two parts: a structural element that sometimes resembles a fin and protrudes below a boat along the central line, or a hydrodynamic element. These parts overlap. As the laying down of the keel is the initial step in the construction of a ship, in British and American ship ... Read »


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    • Naval architecture

    • Naval architecture also known as naval engineering, is an engineering discipline dealing with the engineering design process, shipbuilding, maintenance, and operation of marine vessels and structures. Naval architecture involves basic and applied research, design, development, design evaluation and calculations during ... Read »


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    • Panting (ship construction)

    • Panting refers to the tendency of steel hull plating to flex in and out like an oil can being squeezed when a ship is pitching. This occurs when a ship is making headway in waves. Panting creates significant stress on a ship's hull. It is potentially dangerous and can result in flooding and the separation of the hull a ... Read »


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    • Scantling length

    • Scantling Length is a distance slightly less than the waterline length of a ship, and generally less than the overall length of a ship. In the ABS Rules for Building and Classing Steel Vessels, it is defined as the distance on the summer load line from the fore side of the stem to the centerline of the rudder stock. S ... Read »


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    • Skeg

    • A skeg, (skegg or skag) is a sternward extension of the keel of boats and ships which have a rudder mounted on the centre line. The term also applies to the lowest point on an outboard motor or the outdrive of an inboard/outboard. In more recent years, the name has been used for a fin on a surfboard which improves dire ... Read »


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    • Smooth curve hull

    • Smooth curve hulls are hulls that are rounded and don't usually have any chines or corners. They can be moulded, round-bilged or soft-chined. Examples are the round bilge, semi-round bilge and s-bottom hull. A round bilge hull Semi-round bilge hull S-bottom hull ... Read »


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    • Air cavity system

    • Air cavity system (or ACS) is a modern marine hull design concept based upon capturing air beneath a vessel's hull to reduce drag and increase speed and fuel efficiency. ... Read »


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    • John Alden (naval architect)

    • John Gale Alden (1884–1962) was an American naval architect and the founder of Alden Designs. Alden was born in Troy, New York in 1884, one of eight children, only four of whom survived. His family's summer holidays were spent on the Sakonnet in Rhode Island and on the Narragansett Bay, where he first learned ... Read »


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    • American Bureau of Shipping

    • American Bureau of Shipping

      The American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) is a classification society, with a mission to promote the security of life, property and the natural environment, primarily through the development and verification of standards for the design, construction and operational maintenance of marine-related facilities. At the end of 20 ... Read »


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    • American Society of Naval Engineers

    • The American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE) is a professional association of American naval engineers. Naval Engineering includes all arts and sciences as applied in the research, development, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and logistic support of surface and subsurface ships and marine craft; naval a ... Read »


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    • Angle of list

    • The angle of list is the degree to which a vessel heels (leans or tilts) to either port or starboard. A listing vessel is stable and at equilibrium, but the distribution of weight aboard (often caused by uneven loading or flooding) causes it to heel to one side. By contrast roll is the dynamic movement from side to s ... Read »


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    • Angle of loll

    • Angle of loll is the state of a ship that is unstable when upright (i.e. has a negative metacentric height) and therefore takes on an angle of heel to either port or starboard. When a vessel has negative metacentric height (GM) i.e., is in unstable equilibrium, any external force applied to the vessel will cause it to ... Read »


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    • Anti-torpedo bulge

    • The anti-torpedo bulge (also known as an anti-torpedo blister) is a form of passive defence against naval torpedoes occasionally employed in warship construction in the period between the First and Second World Wars. It involved fitting (or retrofitting) partially water-filled compartmentalized sponsons on either side ... Read »


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    • Armoured flight deck

    • An armoured flight deck is an aircraft carrier flight deck that incorporates substantial armour in its design. Comparison is often made between the carrier designs of the Royal Navy (RN) and the United States Navy (USN). The two navies followed differing philosophies in the use of armour on carrier flight decks, start ... Read »


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    • Bow wave

    • A bow wave is the wave that forms at the bow of a ship when it moves through the water. As the bow wave spreads out, it defines the outer limits of a ship's wake. A large bow wave slows the ship down, is a risk to smaller boats, and in a harbor can damage shore facilities and moored ships. Therefore, ship hulls are gen ... Read »


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    • Bureau of Construction and Repair

    • The Bureau of Construction and Repair (BuC&R) was the part of the United States Navy which from 1862 to 1940 was responsible for supervising the design, construction, conversion, procurement, maintenance, and repair of ships and other craft for the Navy. The bureau also managed shipyards, repair facilities, laboratorie ... Read »


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    • Bureau of Ships

    • The United States Navy's Bureau of Ships (BuShips) was established by Congress on 20 June 1940, by a law which consolidated the functions of the Bureau of Construction and Repair (BuC&R) and the Bureau of Engineering (BuEng). The new bureau was to be headed by a chief and deputy-chief, one selected from the Engineering ... Read »


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    • Butterworth Cover

    • A Butterworth cover (also Butterworth hatch and Butterworth plate) is a hatch on the deck of a cargo vessel that is used to seal a small opening that admits to the space below. In oil tankers and other marine vessels used for transporting fluid products, there are small service openings though the deck into each tank ... Read »


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    • Camber (ship)

    • The camber is a measure of lateral main deck curvature in naval architecture. The curve is applied to a deck transversely, measured as the height of deck at centreline above the height of deck at side. The practice of adding camber to a ship's deck originated in the era of small sailing ships. These vessels were built ... Read »


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    • Capsize screening formula

    • The capsize screening formula (CSF) is a somewhat controversial figure. It is defined for sailboats as: CSF = Beam / (Displacement/64.2)1/3 It came into being after the 1979 Fastnet race in England where a storm shredded the race fleet. The Cruising Club of America (CCA) put together a technical committee that analyz ... Read »


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    • Chalmers Naval Architecture Students' Society


    • Classification society

    • A classification society is a non-governmental organization that establishes and maintains technical standards for the construction and operation of ships and offshore structures. The society will also validate that construction is according to these standards and carry out regular surveys in service to ensure complian ... Read »


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    • Cofferdam

    • A cofferdam (also called a coffer) is a temporary enclosure built within, or in pairs across, a body of water and constructed to allow the enclosed area to be pumped out. This pumping creates a dry work environment for the major work to proceed. Enclosed coffers are commonly used for construction and repair of oil plat ... Read »


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    • Compartment (ship)

    • A compartment is a portion of the space within a ship defined vertically between decks and horizontally between bulkheads. It is analogous to a room within a building, and may provide watertight subdivision of the ship's hull important in retaining buoyancy if the hull is damaged. Subdivision of a ship's hull into wate ... Read »


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    • Concord Naval Weapons Station

    • Concord Naval Weapons Station

      Coordinates: 37°59′39″N 121°58′58″W / 37.99417°N 121.98278°W / 37.99417; -121.98278 Concord Naval Weapons Station was a military base established in 1942 north of the city of Concord, California at the shore of the Sacramento River where it widens into Suisun Bay. The ... Read »


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    • Cooks Yard

    • Walter Cook established a Thames sailing barge building business in 1894 on the bank of the River Blackwater at Maldon, Essex, England. The business, known as Walter Cook and Son, operated until the 1980s - at which time, it was the last remaining barge yard in Britain. In 1999, Topsail Charters took on the lease of t ... Read »


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    • Dromon Bureau of Shipping

    • Dromon Bureau of Shipping is an International Classification Society, providing classification and statutory certification services to ships and other marine structures, based on International Conventions, Rules and Regulations. DBS maintains a Quality Management System applicable to Classification of Ships and Vessels ... Read »


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    • Flare (ship)

    • Flare is the angle at which a ship's hull plate or planking departs from the vertical in an outward direction with increasing height. A flared hull typically has a deck area larger than its cross-sectional area at the waterline. Most vessels have some degree of flare above the waterline. Advantages of hull flare can in ... Read »


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    • Float-out

    • Float-out is the process in modern shipbuilding that follows the keel laying and precedes the fitting-out process. It is analogous to launching a ship, a specific process that has largely been discontinued in modern shipbuilding. Both floating-out and launching are the times when the ship leaves dry land and becomes wa ... Read »


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    • Floating airport

    • A floating airport is an airport built and situated on a very large floating structure (VLFS) located many miles out at sea utilizing a flotation type of device or devices such as Pneumatic Stabilized Platform (PSP) technology. As the population increases and land becomes more expensive and scarce, very large floating ... Read »


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    • Flush deck

    • Flush deck is a term in naval architecture. It can refer to any deck of a ship which is continuous from stem to stern. It has two specific common referents: "Flush deck" with "flush" in its generic meaning of "even or level; forming an unbroken plane", is sometimes applied to vessels, as in describing yachts lacking a ... Read »


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    • Forces on sails

    • Forces on sails result from movement of air that interacts with sails and gives them motive power for sailing craft, including sailing ships, sailboats, windsurfers, ice boats, and sail-powered land vehicles. Similar principles in a rotating frame of reference apply to wind mill sails and wind turbine blades, which are ... Read »


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    • Free surface effect

    • The free surface effect is a mechanism which can cause a watercraft to become unstable and capsize. It refers to the tendency of liquids — and of unbound aggregates of small solid objects, like seeds, gravel, or crushed ore, whose behavior approximates that of liquids — to move in response to changes in the ... Read »


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    • Froude–Krylov force


    • George Steers and Co

    • George Steers & Co was a shipyard company at Greenpoint, Long Island, New York. In 1850, James Rich Steers and George Steers started the George Steers & Co. inheriting from a naval architecture tradition. The father Henry Steers was already a naval architect in England. The company was located in Greenpoint, Long ... Read »


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    • Germanischer Lloyd

    Performance-Orientated Industry Shipbuilding, Offshore, Oil & Gas, Wind Energy Genre Classification Society & Consultancy Founded 1867 Headquarters 18, Brooktorkai,
  • Germanischer Lloyd SE

Executive Board: Erik van der Noordaa, Dr. J. Segatz, P. Paasivaara. The Germanischer Lloyd SE was a classification society based in the city of Hamburg, Germany. It ceased to exist as an independent entity on September 2013 as a result of its merger with Norway's DNV (Det Norske Veritas) to become the present-day DNV ... Read »


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  • Hodgdon Yachts

  • Hodgdon Yachts

    Hodgdon Yachts (incorporated as Hodgdon Shipbuilding, LLC and previously known as "Hodgdon Brothers" yard ) is a builder of yachts and specialized military vessels, based in East Boothbay, Maine. It is a family-run business that was founded in 1816—reputedly the oldest continuously operating family boatbuilder in ... Read »


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  • Hull (watercraft)

  • The hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. Above the hull is the superstructure and/or deckhouse, where present. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline. The structure of the hull varies depending on the vessel type. In a typical modern steel ship, the structure consists of wate ... Read »


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  • International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea

  • The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972 (Colregs) are published by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and set out, among other things, the "rules of the road" or navigation rules to be followed by ships and other vessels at sea to prevent collisions between two or more vessels. CO ... Read »


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  • John Elder Professor of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering

  • The John Elder Professor of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering at Glasgow University, in Scotland, was founded in 1883 and endowed by Isabella Elder (1828-1905) in memory of her husband, John Elder, marine engineer and shipbuilder of Randolph, Elder & Co., (1824-1869). ... Read »


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  • Maxime Laubeuf

  • Maxime Laubeuf was a French maritime engineer of the late nineteenth century. He was born on 23 November 1864 at Poissy, Yvelines, and died on 23 December 1939 in Cannes, Alpes-Maritimes. Laubeuf was a pioneer in the design and building of submarines, and was responsible for a number of the innovations that led to mod ... Read »


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  • Limit of positive stability

  • The limit of positive stability (LPS) is the angle from the vertical at which a boat will no longer stay upright but will capsize, becoming , or turtled. It is also known as the angle of vanishing stability (AVS). For example, if a boat with an LPS of 120 degrees rolls past this point, i.e. its mast is already at an a ... Read »


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  • Lyon's Whelp


  • Mare Island Naval Shipyard

  • Mare Island Naval Shipyard

    The Mare Island Naval Shipyard (MINSY) was the first United States Navy base established on the Pacific Ocean. It is located 25 miles northeast of San Francisco in Vallejo, California. The Napa River goes through the Mare Island Strait and separates the peninsula shipyard (Mare Island, California) from the main portion ... Read »


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  • Maritime Research Institute Netherlands

  • MARIN, the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands, is one of the leading institutes in the world for hydrodynamic research and maritime technology. The services incorporate a unique combination of simulation, model testing, full-scale measurements and training programmes. MARIN provides services to the shipbuilding an ... Read »


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  • Noise and vibration on maritime vessels

  • Noise and vibration on maritime vessels are not the same but they have the same origin and come in many forms. The methods to handle the related problems are similar, to a certain level, where most shipboard noise problems are reduced by controlling vibration. The main producers of mechanically created noise and v ... Read »


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  • Padded V-hull

  • A padded v-hull is a type of high performance watercraft. They can come in many different configurations from that of a pure race boat to that of a recreational craft. A padded v-hull is very similar in basic shape to the popular v-hull which simply forms a vee when looking at the back of the watercraft. The diffe ... Read »


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  • Pneumatic stabilized platform

  • A Pneumatic stabilized platform (PSP) is a technology used to float a very large floating structure (VLFS). PSP utilizes indirect displacement, in which a platform rests on trapped air that displaces the water. The primary buoyancy force is provided by air pressure acting on the underside of the deck. The PSP is a dis ... Read »


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  • Pontoon effect

  • The pontoon effect refers to the tendency of a vessel whose flotation depends on lateral pontoons to capsize without warning when a lateral force is applied. The effect can be sudden and dramatic because the vessel is stable and self-righting as greater lateral force is applied, up to the point that the pontoon(s) on o ... Read »


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  • Response amplitude operator

  • In the field of ship design and design of other floating structures, a response amplitude operator (RAO) is an engineering statistic, or set of such statistics, that are used to determine the likely behavior of a ship when operating at sea. Known by the acronym of RAO, response amplitude operators are usually obtained ... Read »


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  • Royal Corps of Naval Constructors

  • The Royal Corps of Naval Constructors is an institution of the British Royal Navy and Admiralty for training in naval architecture, marine, electrical and weapon engineering. It was established by Order in Council in August 1883, on the recommendation of the naval architect Sir William White. Its precursor was the Roya ... Read »


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  • Royal Institution of Naval Architects

  • Royal Institution of Naval Architects

    The Royal Institution of Naval Architects (also known as RINA) is an international organisation representing naval architects. It is an elite international professional institution based in London. Its members are involved worldwide at all levels in the design, construction, repair and operation of ships, boats and mar ... Read »


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  • Royal School of Naval Architecture

  • Royal School of Naval Architecture

    The first School of Naval Architecture opened in 1811 in Portsmouth and closed in 1832. The Royal School of Naval Architecture or Royal School of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering was an institution founded in South Kensington in 1864 to train naval architects. It was founded by Joseph Woolley, who had been Pri ... Read »


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  • School of Mathematics and Naval Construction

  • School of Mathematics and Naval Construction

    The Central School of Mathematics and Naval Construction was a short-lived shipbuilding college at Portsmouth Dockyard on the south coast of England. It was founded in 1848 but only lasted five years, until 1853. The first Principal was Joseph Woolley, who in 1864 would found the Royal School of Naval Architecture and ... Read »


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  • Sheer (ship)

  • The sheer is a measure of longitudinal main deck curvature, in naval architecture. The sheer forward is usually twice that of sheer aft. Increases in the rise of the sheer forward and aft builds volume into the hull, and in turn increases its buoyancy forward and aft, thereby keeping the ends from diving into an oncomi ... Read »


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  • Ship and Offshore Structural Mechanics Laboratory

  • The Ship and Offshore Structural Mechanics Laboratory (SSML) is a laboratory in the Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering of Pusan National University. The SSML develops methods useful for strength analysis and structural design of marine structures. The methods developed should be helpful for achievem ... Read »


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  • Ship resistance and propulsion

  • A ship must be designed to move efficiently through the water with a minimum of external force. For thousands of years ship designers and builders of sailing vessels used rules of thumb based on the midship-section area to size the sails for a given vessel. The hull form and sail plan for the clipper ships, for example ... Read »


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  • Shipbuilding

  • Shipbuilding is the construction of ships and other floating vessels. It normally takes place in a specialized facility known as a shipyard. Shipbuilders, also called shipwrights, follow a specialized occupation that traces its roots to before recorded history. Shipbuilding and ship repairs, both commercial and milita ... Read »


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  • Worshipful Company of Shipwrights

  • Worshipful Company of Shipwrights

    The Worshipful Company of Shipwrights is one of the ancient livery companies of the City of London. The Shipwrights' Company, unlike other livery companies, has not received a Royal Charter because maritime trade by definition was never confined within the boundaries of the Square Mile; instead a corporate body of Lon ... Read »


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  • Significant wave height

  • In physical oceanography, the significant wave height (SWH or Hs) is defined traditionally as the mean wave height (trough to crest) of the highest third of the waves (H1/3). Nowadays it is usually defined as four times the standard deviation of the surface elevation – or equivalently as four times the square root ... Read »


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  • Simpson's Rules (Ship Stability)


  • Slamming

  • Slamming is the impact of the bottom structure of a ship onto the sea surface. It is mainly observed while sailing in waves, when the bow raises from the water and subsequently impacts on it. Slamming induces extremely high loads to ship structures and is taken into consideration when designing ships. ... Read »


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  • Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

  • The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

    The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) is a global professional society that provides a forum for the advancement of the engineering profession as applied to the marine field. Although it particularly names the naval architecture and marine engineering specialties, the society includes all types o ... Read »


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  • Springing

  • Springing as a nautical term refers to global vertical resonant hull girder vibration due to oscillating wave loads along the hull of the ship. The hydrodynamic theory of springing is not yet fully understood due to the complex description of the surface waves and structure interaction. It is, however, well known that ... Read »


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  • Squat effect

  • The squat effect is the hydrodynamic phenomenon by which a vessel moving quickly through shallow water creates an area of lowered pressure that causes the ship to be closer to the seabed than would otherwise be expected. This phenomenon is caused when water that should normally flow under the hull encounters resistance ... Read »


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  • Stability conditions

  • The Stability conditions of watercraft are the various standard loading configurations to which a ship, boat, or offshore platform may be subjected. They are recognized by classification societies such as Det Norske Veritas, Lloyd's Register and American Bureau of Shipping (ABS). Classification societies follow rules a ... Read »


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  • Henry Steers

  • Henry Steers (1779 Dartmouth, England - 1852 New York, USA) was a prominent nineteenth-century American shipbuilder of English descent, and the ancestor of a line of important businessmen in various boatbuilding and maritime construction concerns. Born "Henry Steer" in Dartmouth, England in 1779, Steers apprenticed fo ... Read »


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  • James Rich Steers

  • James Rich Steers (1808 – April 16, 1896) was an American yacht builder and politician. Steers was born in Plymouth, England. His father, Henry Steers, was connected to the Construction Department of the Royal Naval Dockyards at Plymouth until 1815, and moved the family to the United States in 1817, including Jam ... Read »


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  • Submarine hull

  • A light hull (casing in British usage) of a submarine is the outer non-watertight hull which provides a hydrodynamically efficient shape. The pressure hull is the inner hull of a submarine; this holds the difference between outside and inside pressure. Modern submarines are usually cigar-shaped. This design, alrea ... Read »


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  • David W. Taylor Medal

  • The David W. Taylor Medal is a medal presented by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers for "notable achievement in naval architecture and/or marine engineering." The medal was named in honor of Rear Admiral David W. Taylor, USN. It is gold-plated bronze approximately 2.5 inches (6.25 cm) in diame ... Read »


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  • Frederick H. Todd

  • Dr. Frederick Henry Todd (August 20, 1903 – January 6, 1992) was a British naval architect, a member of the United States National Academy of Engineering, and a recipient of Gibbs Brothers Medal from the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Todd was born in Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom in 1903. He graduated ... Read »


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  • Transom stern

  • The stern is the back or aft-most part of a ship or boat, technically defined as the area built up over the sternpost, extending upwards from the counter rail to the taffrail. The stern lies opposite of the bow, the foremost part of a ship. Originally, the term only referred to the aft port section of the ship, but eve ... Read »


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  • Tribon

  • Tribon is a naval architecture program originally developed by Kockum Computer Systems (KCS) for designing commercial and naval vessels. KCS was spun off from Kockums shipyards as an independent company, later renamed Tribon Systems, which was in turn acquired by AVEVA in 2004. Tribon is actually a family of programs ... Read »


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  • Very large floating structure

  • Very large floating structures (VLFSs) or very large floating platforms (VLFPs) are manmade islands, which may be constructed to create floating airports, bridges, breakwaters, piers and docks, storage facilities (for oil & natural gas), wind and solar power plants, for military purposes, to create industrial space, em ... Read »


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  • Watercraft

  • Watercraft are water-borne vehicles including ships, boats, hovercraft and submarines. Watercraft usually have propulsive capability (whether by sail, oar or engine) and hence are distinct from a simple device that merely floats, such as a log raft. Most watercraft would be described as either a ship or a boat. Ho ... Read »


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  • Wave-making resistance

  • Wave-making resistance is a form of drag that affects surface watercraft, such as boats and ships, and reflects the energy required to push the water out of the way of the hull. This energy goes into creating the wave. For small displacement hulls, such as sailboats or rowboats, wave-making resistance is the major ... Read »


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  • Wave-piercing hull

  • A wave-piercing boat hull has a very fine bow, with reduced buoyancy in the forward portions. When a wave is encountered, the lack of buoyancy means the hull pierces through the water rather than riding over the top, resulting in a smoother ride than traditional designs, and in diminished mechanical stress on the vess ... Read »


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  • Way (vessel)

  • Way, (sometimes Weigh) in a nautical context of a ship or vessel, is a noun that refers to her speed or momentum. As an example the Oxford English Dictionary, sense 14, has "She ran into the Nio before her way could be stopped." (Taken from an Admiralty report of a collision at sea). The Practice of Navigation and Na ... Read »


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  • Wetted area

  • In maritime use, the wetted area is the area of the hull (watercraft) which is immersed in water. In aeronautics, the wetted area is the area which is in contact with the external airflow. This has a direct relationship on the overall aerodynamic drag of the aircraft. See also Wetted aspect ratio. ... Read »


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