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  • Music psychology

    Music psychology

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Music psychology

    • Auditory illusions

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Auditory illusions


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    • Cognitive musicology

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Cognitive musicology


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    • Music cognition

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Music cognition


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    • Music psychologists

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Music psychologists


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    • Psychoacoustics

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Psychoacoustics


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    • Music psychology

    • Music psychology, or the psychology of music, may be regarded as a branch of both psychology and musicology. It aims to explain and understand musical behavior and experience, including the processes through which music is perceived, created, responded to, and incorporated into everyday life. Modern music psychology is ... Read »


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    • Absolute pitch

    • Absolute pitch (AP), widely referred to as perfect pitch, is a rare auditory phenomenon characterized by the ability of a person to identify or re-create a given musical note without the benefit of a reference tone. AP can be demonstrated via linguistic labeling ("naming" a note), auditory imagery, or sensorimotor res ... Read »


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    • Amusia

    • Amusia is a musical disorder that appears mainly as a defect in processing pitch but also encompasses musical memory and recognition. Two main classifications of amusia exist: acquired amusia, which occurs as a result of brain damage, and congenital amusia, which results from a music-processing anomaly present since bi ... Read »


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    • Auditory arrhythmia

    • Auditory arrhythmia is the inability to rhythmically perform music, to keep time, and to replicate musical or rhythmic patterns. It has been caused by damage to the cerebrum or rewiring of the brain. An individual with this condition has an especially difficult time maintaining a steady beat, and even has difficul ... Read »


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    • Auditory illusion

    • An auditory illusion is an illusion of hearing, the aural equivalent of an optical illusion: the listener hears either sounds which are not present in the stimulus, or "impossible" sounds. In short, auditory illusions highlight areas where the human ear and brain, as organic, makeshift tools, differ from perfect audio ... Read »


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    • Auditory imagery

    • Auditory imagery is a form of mental imagery that is used to organize and analyze sounds when there is no external auditory stimulus present. This form of imagery is broken up into a couple of auditory modalities such as verbal imagery or musical imagery. This modality of mental imagery differs from other sensory image ... Read »


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    • Background music

    • Background music refers to various styles of music or soundscapes primarily intended to be passively listened to. It is not meant to be the main focus of an audience, but rather to supplement that which is meant to be focused upon. Music that is played at a low volume and is not the main focus of an audience is also re ... Read »


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    • Beat deafness

    • Beat deafness is a form of congenital amusia characterized by a person's inability to feel musical rhythm or move in time to it. Generally, humans have the ability to hear musical beat and rhythm beginning in infancy. Some people however, are unable to move in sync with the beat and rhythm of music, suffering from ... Read »


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    • Biomusicology

    • Biomusicology is the study of music from a biological point of view. The term was coined by Nils L. Wallin in 1991 to encompass several branches of music psychology and musicology, including evolutionary musicology, neuromusicology, and comparative musicology. Evolutionary musicology studies the "origins of music, the ... Read »


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    • Cognitive musicology

    • Cognitive musicology is a branch of cognitive science concerned with computationally modeling musical knowledge with the goal of understanding both music and cognition. Cognitive musicology can be differentiated from other branches of music psychology via its methodological emphasis, using computer modeling to study m ... Read »


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    • Cognitive neuroscience of music

    • The cognitive neuroscience of music is the scientific study of brain-based mechanisms involved in the cognitive processes underlying music. These behaviours include music listening, performing, composing, reading, writing, and ancillary activities. It also is increasingly concerned with the brain basis for musical aest ... Read »


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    • Consonance and dissonance

    • In music, consonance and dissonance form a structural dichotomy in which the terms define each other by mutual exclusion: a consonance is what is not dissonant, and reciprocally. However, a finer consideration shows that the distinction forms a gradation, from the most consonant to the most dissonant. Consonance is ass ... Read »


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    • Culture in music cognition

    • Culture in music cognition refers to the impact that a person's culture has on their music cognition, including their preferences, emotion recognition, and musical memory. Musical preferences are biased toward culturally familiar musical traditions beginning in infancy, and adults' classification of the emotion of a mu ... Read »


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    • Deutsch's scale illusion


    • Earworm

    • An earworm, sometimes known as a brainworm,sticky music, or stuck song syndrome, is a catchy piece of music that continually repeats through a person's mind after it is no longer playing. Phrases used to describe an earworm include "musical imagery repetition", "involuntary musical imagery", and "stuck song syndrome". ... Read »


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    • Embodied music cognition

    • Embodied music cognition is a direction within systematic musicology interested in studying the role of the human body in relation to all musical activities. It considers the human body as the natural mediator between mind (focused on musical intentions, meanings, significations) and physical environment (containing m ... Read »


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    • Entrainment (biomusicology)

    • Entrainment in the biomusicological sense refers to the synchronization of organisms (only humans as a whole, with some particular instances of a particular animal) to an external perceived rhythm, such as human music and dance such as foot tapping. Beat induction is the process in which a regular isochronous puls ... Read »


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    • Evolutionary musicology

    • Evolutionary musicology is a subfield of biomusicology that grounds the psychological mechanisms of music perception and production in evolutionary theory. It covers vocal communication in non-human animal species, theories of the evolution of human music, and cross-cultural human universals in musical ability and proc ... Read »


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    • Exercise and music

    • The interplay of exercise and music have been long-discussed, crossing the disciplines of biomechanics, neurology, physiology and sport psychology. People "automatically feel the beat" of the music they listen to and instinctively adjust their walking pace and heart rate to the tempo of the music . Listening to music w ... Read »


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    • Eye movement in music reading

    • Eye movement in music reading is the scanning of a musical score by a musician's eyes. This usually occurs as the music is read during performance, although musicians sometimes scan music silently to study it. The phenomenon has been studied by researchers from a range of backgrounds, including cognitive psychology and ... Read »


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    • Focal dystonia

    • Focal dystonia is a neurological condition that affects a muscle or group of muscles in a specific part of the body, causing involuntary muscular contractions and abnormal postures. For example, in focal hand dystonia, the fingers either curl into the palm or extend outward without control. In musicians, the condition ... Read »


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    • Generative theory of tonal music

    • A generative theory of tonal music (GTTM) is a theory of music conceived by American composer and music theorist Fred Lerdahl and American linguist Ray Jackendoff and presented in the 1983 book of the same title. It constitutes a "formal description of the musical intuitions of a listener who is experienced in a musica ... Read »


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    • Hedonic music consumption model

    • The hedonic music consumption model was created by music researchers Kathleen Lacher and Richard Mizeski in 1994. Their goal was to use this model to examine the responses that listening to rock music creates, and to find if these responses influenced the listener's intention to later purchase the music. The article be ... Read »


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    • Illusory discontinuity

    • Illusory discontinuity is an auditory illusion in which a continuous ongoing sound becomes inaudible during a brief, non-masking noise. The illusion is perceived only by some listeners, but not by others, reflecting individual variation in hearing abilities. It has been estimated that among young adults 24% are suscept ... Read »


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    • Levitin effect

    • The Levitin effect refers to the phenomenon, first documented by Dr. Daniel J. Levitin in 1994, that people – even those without musical training – tend to remember songs in the correct key. The finding stood in contrast to the large body of laboratory literature suggesting that such details of perceptual exp ... Read »


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    • Melodic expectation

    • In music cognition and musical analysis, the study of melodic expectation considers the engagement of the brain's predictive mechanisms in response to music. For example, if the ascending musical partial octave "do-re-mi-fa-sol-la-ti-..." is heard, listeners familiar with Western music will have a strong expectation to ... Read »


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    • Melodic fission

    • In music cognition, melodic fission (also known as melodic or auditory streaming, or stream segregation), is a phenomenon in which one line of pitches (an auditory stream) is heard as two or more separate melodic lines. This occurs when a phrase contains groups of pitches at two or more distinct registers or with two o ... Read »


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    • Mozart effect

    • The Mozart effect can refer to: The term was first coined by Alfred A. Tomatis who used Mozart's music as the listening stimulus in his work attempting to cure a variety of disorders. The approach has been popularized in Don Campbell's book, The Mozart Effect, which is based on an experiment published in Nature sugges ... Read »


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    • Music Acquisition

    • Music acquisition is a theory or a term that has not yet been clearly or concisely defined, although there has been research done and attempts to prove that acquiring music, like language, is cognitively possible over time. Furthermore, the process of actually and gradually acquiring music has been carefully looked at ... Read »


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    • Music and emotion

    • The study of music and emotion seeks to understand the psychological relationship between human affect and music. It is a branch of music psychology with numerous areas of study, including the nature of emotional reactions to music, how characteristics of the listener may determine which emotions are felt, and which co ... Read »


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    • Music in psychological operations

    • Music has been used in psychological operations. The term music torture is sometimes used by critics of the practice of playing loud music incessantly to prisoners or people besieged. The United Nations and the European Court of Human Rights have banned the use of loud music in interrogations. The term torture is some ... Read »


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    • Music-related memory

    • Musical memory refers to the ability to remember music-related information, such as melodic content and other progressions of tones or pitches. The differences found between linguistic memory and musical memory have led researchers to theorize that musical memory is encoded differently from language and may constitute ... Read »


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    • Music-specific disorders

    • Neuroscientists have learned a lot about the role of the brain in numerous cognitive mechanisms by understanding corresponding disorders. Similarly, neuroscientists have come to learn a lot about music cognition by studying music-specific disorders. Even though music is most often viewed from a "historical perspective ... Read »


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    • Musicae Scientiae (journal)

    • Musicae Scientiae  

      Musicae Scientiae is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal covering the field of music psychology. The editor-in-chief is Reinhard Kopiez (Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien Hannover). It was established 1997 and is published by Sage Publications on behalf of the European Society for the Cognitive Science ... Read »


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    • Musical gesture

    • In music, gesture is any movement, either physical (bodily) or mental (imaginary). As such "gesture" includes both categories of movements required to produce sound and categories of perceptual moves associated with those gestures. The concept of musical gestures has received much attention in various musicological dis ... Read »


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    • Musical hallucinations

    • Musical hallucinations fall under the category of auditory hallucinations and describe a disorder in which a sound is perceived as instrumental music, sounds, or songs. It is a very rare disorder, reporting only 0.16% in a cohort study of 3,678 individuals. According to Oliver Sacks' Hallucinations, the first know ... Read »


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    • Musical semantics

    • Music semantics refers to the ability of music to convey semantic meaning. Semantics are a key feature of language, and whether music shares some of the same ability to prime and convey meaning has been the subject of recent study. Primate vocalizations are mainly determined by music-like features (such as pitch, ... Read »


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    • Musical syntax

    • When analysing the regularities and structure of music as well as the processing of music in the brain, certain findings lead to the question of whether music is based on a syntax that could be compared with linguistic syntax. To get closer to this question it is necessary to have a look at the basic aspects of syntax ... Read »


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    • Psychoacoustics

    • Psychoacoustics is the scientific study of sound perception. More specifically, it is the branch of science studying the psychological and physiological responses associated with sound (including speech and music). It can be further categorized as a branch of psychophysics. Psychoacoustics received its name from a fiel ... Read »


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    • Psychology of music preference

    • The psychology of music preference refers to the psychological factors behind peoples' different music preferences. Music is heard by people daily in many parts of the world, and affects people in various ways from emotion regulation to cognitive development, along with providing a means for self-expression. Music trai ... Read »


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    • Relative pitch

    • Relative pitch is the ability of a person to identify or re-create a given musical note by comparing it to a reference note and identifying the interval between those two notes. Relative pitch implies some or all of the following abilities: This last definition, which applies not only to singers but also to players of ... Read »


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    • Spiral array model

    • In music theory, the spiral array model is an extended type of pitch space. A mathematical model involving concentric helices (an "array of spirals"), it represents human perceptions of pitches, chords and keys in the same geometric space. It was proposed in 2000 by Prof. Elaine Chew in her MIT doctoral thesis Toward a ... Read »


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    • Temporal dynamics of music and language

    • The temporal dynamics of music and language describes how the brain coordinates its different regions to process musical and vocal sounds. Both music and language feature rhythmic and melodic structure. Both employ a finite set of basic elements (such as tones or words) that are combined in ordered ways to create compl ... Read »


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    • Tonal memory

    • In music, tonal memory or "aural recall" is the ability to recall a previously sounded tone. Tonal memory assists with staying in tune and may be developed through ear training. Extensive tonal memory may be recognized as an indication of potential compositional ability. Tonal memory may be used as a strategy for lear ... Read »


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    • Tone deafness

    • Amusia is a musical disorder that appears mainly as a defect in processing pitch but also encompasses musical memory and recognition. Two main classifications of amusia exist: acquired amusia, which occurs as a result of brain damage, and congenital amusia, which results from a music-processing anomaly present since bi ... Read »


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