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    Military terminology

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    • Military slang and jargon

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    • Ancient Greek military terminology

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    • Cold War terminology

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    • Glossaries of the military

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    • Net-centric

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    • Military terminology of Pakistan

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    • States by power status

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    • Military terminology of the United States

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    • Military

    • The military, also called the armed forces, are forces authorized to use deadly force, and weapons, to support the interests of the state and some or all of its citizens. The task of the military is usually defined as defense of the state and its citizens, and the prosecution of war against another state. The military ... Read »


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    • Military terminology

    • Military terminology refers to the terms and language of military organizations and personnel as belonging to a discrete category, as distinguishable by their usage in military doctrine, as they serve to depoliticise, dehumanise, or otherwise abstract discussion about its operations from an actual description thereof. ... Read »


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    • List of established military terms

    • This is a list of established military terms which have been in use for at least 50 years. Since technology has changed, not all of them are in current use, or they may have been superseded by more modern terms. However, they are still in current use in articles about previous military periods. Some of them like camouf ... Read »


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    • Acceptable loss

    • An acceptable loss, also known as acceptable damage, is a military euphemism used to indicate casualties or destruction inflicted by the enemy that is considered minor or tolerable. In combat situations, leaders have to often choose between options where no one solution is perfect and all choices will lead to casualtie ... Read »


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    • Air Command

    • Air Command is a term used to refer to the command structure of some air forces. Examples include: ... Read »


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    • Air Observation Post

    • Air Observation Post (AOP) is the term used by the Royal Air Force and other services of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth air forces, for an aeroplane or helicopter used in the role of artillery spotter. In this role, either the pilot of the aircraft or a passenger acts as an observer watching for targets on the gro ... Read »


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    • Airborne early warning and control

    • An airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) system is an airborne radar picket system designed to detect aircraft, ships and vehicles at long ranges and perform command and control of the battlespace in an air engagement by directing fighter and attack aircraft strikes. AEW&C units are also used to carry out surveill ... Read »


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    • Allotment Annie

    • An Allotment Annie was a special type of US war bride, that marries a soldier just for the pay allocated (or allotted - hence the name) by the government to wives of servicemen. Some of them married several soldiers at the same time to get more pay. Elvira Taylor was a notorious Allotment Annie during World War II who ... Read »


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    • Antestature

    • An antestature is an archaic term for a fortification made of sandbags. They were historically hastily established by a retreating force to slow the progress of the enemy. The word comes from the Latin ante ("before"), and statÅ«ra ("a standing").  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the pub ... Read »


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    • Anti-submarine drone

    • Anti-submarine drones are Unmanned surface vehicles designed to stalk and hunt submarines. They are an emerging technology with a prototype ACTUV being designed by DARPA as a potentially smaller, more efficient Anti-submarine warfare capability for the United States Navy. Unmanned aerial vehicle ... Read »


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    • Armchair general

    • "Armchair general" is a derogatory term for a person who regards himself or herself as an expert on military matters, despite possessing little to no actual experience in the military. The most common usage of the term refers to "[a] person without military experience who regards himself or herself as an expert mi ... Read »


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    • Arms race

    • An arms race, in its original usage, is a competition between two or more parties to have the best armed forces. Each party competes to produce larger numbers of weapons, greater armies, superior military technology, etc. in a technological escalation. International conflict specialist Theresa Clair Smith, defines the ... Read »


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    • Awkward squad

    • An awkward squad is a group of individuals, normally within an existing organisation or structure, who resist or obstruct change, either through incompetence or by deliberate association. It is commonly accepted that shortly before his death in 1796 Robert Burns uttered the words "Don't let the awkward squad fire ... Read »


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    • Base of fire

    • In military terminology, a base of fire is a supporting force that provides overwatch and covering fire to other advancing units while they are executing fire and movement tactics. A base of fire can be a platoon during company fire and movement, by individual armoured fighting vehicles (esp. tanks) or infantry section ... Read »


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    • Battle command

    • Battle command (BC) is the art and science of visualizing, describing, directing, and leading forces in operations against a hostile, thinking, and adaptive enemy. Battle command applies leadership to translate decision into actions, by synchronizing forces and warfighting functions in time, space, and purpose, to acco ... Read »


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    • Battle cry

    • A battle cry is a yell or chant taken up in battle, usually by members of the same combatant group. Battle cries are not necessarily articulate, although they often aim to invoke patriotic or religious sentiment. Their purpose is a combination of arousing aggression and esprit de corps on one's own side and causing int ... Read »


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    • Battlespace

    • Battlespace is a term used to signify a unified military strategy to integrate and combine armed forces for the military theatre of operations, including air, information, land, sea, and space to achieve military goals. It includes the environment, factors, and conditions that must be understood to successfully apply c ... Read »


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    • Body count

    • Body count

      Body Count is an American heavy metal band formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1990. The group is fronted by Ice-T, who co-founded the group with lead guitarist Ernie C out of their interest in heavy metal music. Ice-T took on the role of vocalist and writing the lyrics for most of the group's songs. Lead guitarist E ... Read »


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    • Brevet (military)

    • In many of the world's military establishments, a brevet (i/brəˈvɛt/ or i/ˈbrɛvɪt/) was a warrant giving a commissioned officer a higher rank title as a reward for gallantry or meritorious conduct, but without receiving the authority, precedence, or pay of real rank. An officer so promoted was referre ... Read »


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    • Brevet d'état-major


    • Multiservice tactical brevity code

    • Multiservice tactical brevity codes are codes used by various military forces. The codes' procedure words, a type of voice procedure, are designed to convey complex information with a few words. This is a list of American standardized brevity code words. The scope is limited to those brevity codes used in multiservice ... Read »


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    • Bridgehead

    • A bridgehead (or bridge-head) is the strategically important area of ground around the end of a bridge or other place of possible crossing over a body of water which at time of conflict is sought to be defended/taken over by the belligerent forces. Bridgeheads typically exist for only a few days, the invading forces e ... Read »


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    • Cadre (military)

    • A cadre (UK: /ˈkɑːdər/ or US: /ˈkædreɪ/) is the complement of commissioned officers and non-commissioned officers of a military unit responsible for training the rest of the unit. The cadre may be the permanent skeleton establishment of a unit, around which the full unit can be built if needed. In ... Read »


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    • Capabilities exercise

    • A capabilities exercise (CAPEX) is a form of military or emergency response exercise. Examples include capabilities exercises conducted for the low-altitude parachute-extraction system, the VMA-542 fixed wing attack squadron, or to demonstrate a capability such as deployment of emergency response assets, and so on. ... Read »


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    • Casualty (person)

    • A casualty in military usage is a person in military service, combatant or non-combatant, who becomes unavailable for duty due to several circumstances, including death, injury, illness, capture and desertion. In civilian usage, a casualty is a person who is killed, wounded or injured by some event, and is usually use ... Read »


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    • Catastrophic kill

    • A catastrophic kill, K-Kill or complete kill is damage inflicted on an armored vehicle that amounts to complete destruction of the vehicle, rendering it both permanently non-functional and irreparable. The term knocked out refers to a vehicle which has been damaged to the point of inoperability and abandoned by its cr ... Read »


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    • CENTRIXS

    • The Combined Enterprise Regional Information Exchange System (CENTRIXS) is a collection of classified coalition networks, called enclaves, that enable information sharing through the use of email and Web services, instant messaging or chat, the Common Operational Picture service, and Voice over IP. CENTRIXS supports co ... Read »


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    • CB military symbol

    • Chemical, biological (CB) — and sometimes radiological — warfare agents were assigned what is termed a military symbol by the U.S. military until the American chemical and biological weapons programs were terminated (in 1990 and 1969, respectively). Military symbols applied to the CB agent fill, and not to th ... Read »


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    • Circular error probable

    • In the military science of ballistics, circular error probable (CEP) (also circular error probability or circle of equal probability) is a measure of a weapon system's precision. It is defined as the radius of a circle, centered on the mean, whose boundary is expected to include the landing points of 50% of the rounds. ... Read »


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    • Collateral damage

    • Collateral damage is a general term for deaths, injuries, or other damage inflicted on an unintended target. In American military terminology, it is used for the incidental killing or wounding of non-combatants or damage to non-combatant property during an attack on a legitimate military target. In US military terminol ... Read »


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    • Combat air patrol

    • Combat air patrol (CAP) is a type of flying mission for fighter aircraft. A combat air patrol is an aircraft patrol provided over an objective area, over the force protected, over the critical area of a combat zone, or over an air defense area, for the purpose of intercepting and destroying hostile aircraft before the ... Read »


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    • Combined Anti-Armor Team

    • A Combined Anti-Armor Team is a concept of operations in the United States Marine Corps where a platoon in a weapons company is employed to combat armored vehicles with heavy machine guns and TOW missiles, in addition to providing security for convoys. CAAT platoons are one form of employment for heavy weapons in an in ... Read »


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    • Command and control

    • Command generally refers to the ability to "dominate an area of situation". There are several definitions of command and control (C2). According to older versions of U.S. Army FM 3-0, C2 in a military organization is the exercise of authority and direction by a properly designated commanding officer over assigned and a ... Read »


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    • Common operational picture

    • A common operational picture (COP) is a single identical display of relevant (operational) information (e.g. position of own troops and enemy troops, position and status of important infrastructure such as bridges, roads, etc.) shared by more than one Command. A COP facilitates collaborative planning and combined execu ... Read »


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    • Communications Zone

    • Communications Zone is a US Army and NATO term which describes a part of the theater of war operations. The Communications Zone is the rear part of theater of operations (behind but contiguous to the combat zone) which contains the lines of communications, establishments for supply and evacuation, and other agencies r ... Read »


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    • Company-grade officer

    • Junior officer, company officer or company grade officer refers to the lowest operational commissioned officer category of ranks in a military or paramilitary organization, ranking above non-commissioned officers and below senior officers. The terms company officer or company-grade officer are used more in the Army, A ... Read »


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    • Conquest (military)

    • Conquest involves the act of military of an enemy by force of arms. The Norman conquest of England provides an example: it led to the subjugation of the Kingdom of England to Norman control and brought William the Conqueror to the English throne in 1066. Military history provides many other examples of conquest: the R ... Read »


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    • Cooking off

    • Cooking off (or thermally induced firing) is ammunition exploding prematurely due to heat in the surrounding environment. A fast cook-off is a cook-off caused by fire. A slow cook-off is caused by a sustained thermal event less intense than fire. A cooked-off round may cause a sympathetic detonation of adjacent round ... Read »


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    • Copenhagenization (naval)

    • Copenhagenization refers to the practice of confiscating the warships of a defeated enemy. It first occurred when the British fleet under Admiral Gambier landed Army units equipped with phosphorus loaded Congreve rockets for the Second Battle of Copenhagen in 1807. After the British Navy stole a part of the Dano-Norwe ... Read »


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    • Council of war

    • A council of war is a term in military science that describes a meeting held to decide on a course of action, usually in the midst of a battle. Under normal circumstances, decisions are made by a commanding officer, optionally communicated and coordinated by staff officers, and then implemented by subordinate officers. ... Read »


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    • Counter-battery fire

    • Counter-battery fire (sometimes called counter-fire) is a battlefield military activity to defeat the enemy's indirect fire elements (guns, rocket launchers, artillery and mortars), including their target acquisition, command and control components. Counter-battery arrangements and responsibilities vary between nations ... Read »


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    • Counter-offensive

    • A counter-offensive is the term used by the military to describe large-scale, usually strategic offensive operations by forces that had successfully halted the enemy's offensive, while occupying defensive positions. The counter-offensive is executed after exhausting the enemy's front line troops and after the enemy re ... Read »


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    • Counter-proliferation

    • Counterproliferation refers to diplomatic, intelligence, and military efforts to combat the proliferation of weapons, including both weapons of mass destruction (WMD), long-range missiles, and certain conventional weapons. Nonproliferation and arms control are related terms. In contrast to nonproliferation, which focus ... Read »


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    • Counterattack

    • A counterattack is a tactic employed in response to an attack, with the term originating in "war games". The general objective is to negate or thwart the advantage gained by the enemy during attack, while the specific objectives typically seek to regain lost ground or destroy the attacking enemy (this may take the form ... Read »


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    • Countersign (military)

    • In military terminology, a countersign is a sign, word, or any other signal previously agreed upon and required to be exchanged between a or guard and anybody approaching his or her post. The term usually encompasses both the sign given by the approaching party as well as the sentry's reply. However, in some armies, t ... Read »


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    • Coup d'œil


    • Cover (military)

    • In military combat, the concept of cover refers to anything which is capable of physically protecting an individual from enemy fire. This differentiates it from the similar concept of , in that an object or area of concealment only affords the benefit of stealth, not actual protection from small arms fire or artillery ... Read »


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    • Crémaillère


    • Military crest

    • Military crest is a term in military science that refers to, "An area on the forward or reverse slope of a hill or ridge just below the topographical crest from which maximum observation and direct fire covering the slope down to the base of the hill or ridge can be obtained." The military crest is used in maneuvering ... Read »


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    • Crossing the T

    • Crossing the T or capping the T is a classic naval warfare tactic used from the late 19th to mid 20th centuries, in which a line of warships crosses in front of a line of enemy ships, allowing the crossing line to bring all their guns to bear while receiving fire from only the forward guns of the enemy. It became poss ... Read »


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    • Culminating point

    • The culminating point in military strategy is the point at which a military force no longer is able to perform its operations. On the offensive, the culminating point marks the time when the attacking force can no longer continue its advance, because of supply problems, the opposing force, or the need for rest. The ta ... Read »


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    • Cultural Factors

    • In a synthetic environment, Synthetic Psychological Environment (SPE) (or rules of behavior) refers to the representation (i.e. modeling) of influences to individuals and groups as a result of culture (e.g. demography, law, religion)). SPE is known by many names including: A few models that represent aspects of S ... Read »


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    • Cultural features

    • In a synthetic environment, the synthetic human-made environment (SHME) is the representation (i.e. modeling) of buildings, bridges, roads, and other man-made structures. ... Read »


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    • Cultural Features

    • In a synthetic environment, the synthetic human-made environment (SHME) is the representation (i.e. modeling) of buildings, bridges, roads, and other man-made structures. ... Read »


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    • DADMS

    • DADMS is a military acronym for Deputy Assistant Director of Medical Services, an Australian military classification ... Read »


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    • Debouch

    • In the geography of rivers, streams, and glaciers, a debouch, or debouche, is a place where runoff from a small, confined space emerges into a larger, broader space. The term is of French origin and means to cause to emerge. The term also has a military usage. In fluvial geomorphology a debouch is a place where ru ... Read »


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    • Defection

    • In politics, a defector is a person who gives up allegiance to one state in exchange for allegiance to another, in a way which is considered illegitimate by the first state. More broadly, it involves abandoning a person, cause or doctrine to which one is bound by some tie, as of allegiance or duty. This term is also a ... Read »


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    • Demilitarized zone

    • A demilitarized zone, DMZ or DZ is an area in which treaties or agreements between nations, military powers or contending groups forbid military installations, activities or personnel. A DMZ often lies along an established frontier or boundary between two or more military powers or alliances. A DMZ may sometimes form a ... Read »


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    • Demonstration (military)

    • In military terminology, a demonstration is an attack or show of force on a front where a decision is not sought, made with the aim of deceiving the enemy. An example of a demonstration in the American Civil War was at the Battle of Gettysburg where, on July 2, 1863, General Robert E. Lee ordered Lt. Gen. Richard S. E ... Read »


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    • Denied area

    • A denied area is an intelligence term of art describing an extremely hostile operational environment with heavy surveillance. The United States Department of Defense defines a denied area as "an area under enemy or unfriendly control in which friendly forces cannot expect to operate successfully within existing operat ... Read »


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    • Detachment (military)

    • A detachment (from the French détachement) is a military unit. It can either be detached from a larger unit for a specific function or (particularly in United States Military usage) be a permanent unit smaller than a battalion. The term is often used to refer to a unit that is assigned to a different base from the p ... Read »


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    • Direct fire

    • Direct fire refers to the launching of a projectile directly at a target within the line-of-sight of the firer. The firing weapon must have a sighting device and an unobstructed view to the target, which means no objects or friendly units can be between it and the target. A weapon engaged in direct fire exposes itself ... Read »


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    • Eingreif division

    • Eingreif division is a term for a type of German Army formation of World War I, which developed in 1917, which was responsible for engaging in immediate counter-attacks (Gegenstoße) against enemy troops who broke through a defensive position being held by a front-holding division (Stellungsdivision). Attacks by the ... Read »


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    • Dogsbody

    • A dogsbody, or less commonly dog robber in the Royal Navy, is a junior officer, or more generally someone who does drudge work. A rough American equivalent would be a "gofer," "grunt" or "lackey". The Royal Navy used dried peas and eggs boiled in a bag (pease pudding) as one of their staple foods circa the early 19th ... Read »


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    • Dynamic terrain

    • A Dynamic terrain is the representation of terrain (e.g. mountains, hills, valleys) together with the capability for modification during a simulation (e.g. a constructive soldier (i.e. battlespace entity) digging a trench). Dynamic terrain has been supported in military training simulations since the mid-1990s in ... Read »


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    • Dynamic Weather


    • Economic militarism

    • Economic militarism is the ideology surrounding the use of military expenditure to prop up an economy, or the use of military power to gain control or access to territory or other economic resources. The first important use dates from 1939 with Germany Rampant: A Study in Economic Militarism by Ernest Hambloch, a long ... Read »


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    • Écorcheurs


    • Enfilade and defilade

    • Enfilade and defilade are concepts in military tactics used to describe a military formation's exposure to enemy fire. A formation or position is "in enfilade" if weapons fire can be directed along its longest axis. A unit or position is "in defilade" if it uses natural or artificial obstacles to shield or conceal itse ... Read »


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    • European Union as an emerging superpower

    • European Union as an emerging superpower

      The European Union (EU) has been called an emerging superpower by academics. Many scholars and academics like T. R. Reid,Andrew Reding,Andrew Moravcsik,Mark Leonard,Jeremy Rifkin,John McCormick, and some politicians like Romano Prodi and Tony Blair, either believe that the EU is, or will become, a superpower in the 21s ... Read »


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    • Fatigue duty

    • Fatigue duty is the labor assigned to military men that does not require the use of armament. Parties sent on fatigue duty were known in English by the French term "detachemens" according to an 1805 military dictionary. The term is recorded in America in 1776, and in an 1805 British military dictionary. In the United ... Read »


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    • Field officer

    • A field officer, field grade officer, or senior officer is an army, marine, or air force commissioned officer senior in rank to a company officer but junior to a general officer. In most armies this corresponds to the ranks of major, lieutenant colonel and colonel, or their equivalents. Some countries also include brig ... Read »


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    • Final protective fire

    • Final protective fire refers to a tactical plan for a military unit, set up by the forward observer in support of the infantry, to protect itself against overwhelming attack. A final protective fire is an immediately available preplanned barrier of direct and indirect fire designed to provide close protection to friend ... Read »


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    • Fingerspitzengefühl


    • Fire for effect

    • Fire for effect is a military term. According to NATO doctrine: According to United States Department of Defense: Artillery firing is often calibrated with spotting rounds and a process of adjustment of fire. Once calibrated upon the desired target or bracketed area, a call for "fire for effect" is made - requesting ... Read »


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    • Fire support

    • Fire support is long-range firepower provided to a front-line military unit. Typically, fire support is provided by artillery or close air support (usually directed by a forward observer), and is used to shape the battlefield or, more optimistically, define the battle. Warships, for example, have long provided naval gu ... Read »


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    • Fire Support Coordinating Measure

    • A Fire Support Coordination Measure (FSCM) is one of any number of means to facilitate planning and executing rapid engagement of targets with the appropriate weapon or group of weapons, while simultaneously providing safeguards for everything else on the battlefield. ... Read »


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    • Flag officer

    • A flag officer is a commissioned officer in a nation's armed forces senior enough to be entitled to fly a flag to mark the position from which the officer exercises command. The term is used differently in different countries: The generic title of flag officer is used in several modern navies and coast guards to ... Read »


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    • For but not with

    • In military hardware, fit to receive or fitting "for but not with" is where a weapon or system called for in a design is not installed or is only partially installed during construction, and the installation completed later as needed. This is done to reduce the vehicle's build cost by not purchasing the system at the t ... Read »


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    • Free company

    • A free company (sometimes called a great company or grande companie) was a late medieval army of mercenaries acting independently of any government, and thus "free". They regularly made a living by plunder when they were not employed; in France they were the routiers and écorcheurs who operated outside the highly st ... Read »


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    • Free-fire zone

    • A free-fire zone in U.S. military parlance is a fire control measure, used for coordination between adjacent combat units. The definition used in the Vietnam War by U.S. troops may be found in field manual FM 6-20: General Chuck Yeager in his autobiography describes his (and his associates) disapproval of shoot-an ... Read »


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    • Friendly fire

    • Friendly fire is an attack by a military force on non-enemy, own, allied or neutral, forces while attempting to attack the enemy, either by misidentifying the target as hostile, or due to errors or inaccuracy. Fire not intended to attack the enemy, such as negligent discharge and deliberate firing on one's own troops f ... Read »


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    • List of friendly fire incidents

    • There have been many thousands of friendly fire incidents in recorded military history, accounting for an estimated 2% to 20% of all casualties in battle. The examples listed below illustrate their range and diversity, but this does not reflect increasing frequency. The rate of friendly fire, once allowance has been ma ... Read »


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    • Furphy

    • A furphy is Australian slang for an erroneous or improbable story that is claimed to be factual. Furphies are supposedly 'heard' from reputable sources, sometimes secondhand or thirdhand, and widely believed until discounted. The word is said to derive from water carts designed and made by a company established by John ... Read »


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    • Garret

    • A garret is a habitable attic or small and often dismal or cramped living space at the top of a house or larger residential building. In the days before lifts (elevators) this was the least prestigious position in a building. In this era, the garret often had sloping ceilings. The word entered Middle English via O ... Read »


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    • General Orders for Sentries

    • Orders to Sentry is the official title of a set of rules governing sentry (guard or watch) duty in the United States Armed Forces. While any guard posting has rules that may go without saying ("Stay awake," for instance), these orders are carefully detailed and particularly stressed in the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, ... Read »


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    • German Luftwaffe and Navy Radar Equipment (Funkgerat) Of World War II

    • During World War II, the German Luftwaffe and Navy relied on an increasingly diverse array of communications, IFF and RDF equipment. Most of this equipment received the generic prefix FuG for Funkgerät, meaning "radio equipment". During the war the Germans renumbered their radars. From using the year of introduction ... Read »


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    • Wireless Communications of the German Army WW2

    • During World War II, the German Army relied on an diverse array of communications to maintain contact with its mobile forces and in particular with its armoured forces. Most of this equipment received the generic prefix FuG for Funkgerät, meaning "radio equipment". Occasionally the shorted Fu designation were used a ... Read »


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    • Glossary of Russian and USSR aviation acronyms: Organisations

    • This is a glossary of acronyms and initials used for organisations in the Russian federation and formerly the USSR. The Latin-alphabet names are phonetic representations of the Cyrillic originals, and variations are inevitable. Russian: ЦБПиПЛС - Центры боевогР... Read »


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    • Glossary of Russian and USSR aviation acronyms: Weapons and armament

    • This is a glossary of acronyms and initials used for aircraft weapons in the Russian federation and formerly the USSR. The Latin-alphabet names are phonetic representations of the Cyrillic originals, and variations are inevitable. ... Read »


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    • Grandes companies

    • The grandes compagnies were mercenary companies recruited between the 12th and 14th centuries by private employers during wars. During peacetime, these mercenaries formed bands called grandes compagnies (big companies) and lived by plunder and ransom in the countryside. Grandes compagnies first appeared in the 12t ... Read »


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    • Gueules cassées


    • High-value target

    • In United States military terminology, a high-value target (HVT) is a target (a person or resource) that an enemy commander requires to complete a mission. The term has been widely used in the news media for Osama Bin Laden and high-ranking officers of Al-Qaeda who are considered essential for completing enemy operatio ... Read »


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    • Hotwash

    • A hotwash is the immediate "after-action" discussions and evaluations of an agency's (or multiple agencies') performance following an exercise, training session, or major event, such as Hurricane Katrina. The main purpose of a hotwash session is to identify strengths and weaknesses of the response to a given event, wh ... Read »


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    • Human-in-the-loop

    • Human-in-the-loop or HITL is defined as a model that requires human interaction. HITL is associated with modeling and simulation (M&S) in the live, virtual, and constructive taxonomy. HITL models may conform to human factors requirements as in the case of a mockup. In this type of simulation a human is always part of t ... Read »


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    • Hyperpower

    • A hyperpower is a state that dominates all other states in every sphere of activity, and is considered to be a step higher than a superpower. British journalist Peregrine Worsthorne first coined the term in The Sunday Telegraph's the "Bush doctrine" on 3 March 1991. After the end of the Cold War with the Soviet Union, ... Read »


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    • India as an emerging superpower

    • India as an emerging superpower

      The Republic of India is considered as one of the possible emerging superpowers of the world. This potential is attributed to several indicators, the primary ones being its demographic trends and a rapidly expanding economy and by GDP India became world's fastest growing economy in 2015 with 7.3% GDP rate. The country ... Read »


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    • Initial operating capability

    • Initial operating capability or Initial operational capability (IOC) is the state achieved when a capability is available in its minimum usefully deployable form. The term is often used in government or military procurement. The United States Department of Defense chooses to use the term Initial Operational Capability ... Read »


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    • Junior officer

    • Junior officer, company officer or company grade officer refers to the lowest operational commissioned officer category of ranks in a military or paramilitary organization, ranking above non-commissioned officers and below senior officers. The terms company officer or company-grade officer are used more in the Army, A ... Read »


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    • Kill zone

    • In military tactics, the kill zone, also known as killing zone, is an area entirely covered by defensive fire, an element of ambush within which an approaching enemy force is trapped and destroyed. The objective of the defensive force is to quickly kill or capture all enemy soldiers inside the kill zone. The trapped so ... Read »


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    • Killed in action

    • Killed in action (KIA) is a casualty classification generally used by militaries to describe the deaths of their own combatants at the hands of hostile forces. The United States Department of Defense, for example, says that those declared KIA need not have fired their weapons but have been killed due to hostile attack. ... Read »


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    • Landing area

    • Landing area is an official designation of specialized Earth surface region by the international standard publication describing airfields and airports to aviators, the Aeronautical Information Publication. As such, it is directly translated into dozens of languages, wherever an AIP publication exists, which is one for ... Read »


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    • Lawful enemy combatant

    • The term lawful enemy combatant is defined in the Military Commissions Act of 2006; the term is used as an exclusionary term to prevent most of those who qualify under the definition from being an unlawful enemy combatant. The definition given in the act seems to face several difficulties. Firstly it is to a subst ... Read »


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    • Lethality

    • Lethality (also called deadliness or perniciousness) is how capable something is of causing death. Most often it is used when referring to chemical weapons, biological weapons, or their toxic chemical components. The use of this term denotes the ability of these weapons to kill, but also the possibility that they may n ... Read »


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    • Levée en masse


    • Line officer

    • In the United States Armed Forces, the term line officer or officer of the line refers to a U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine, U.S. Air Force or U.S. Coast Guard commissioned officer who exercises general command authority and is eligible for operational command positions, as opposed to officers who normally exercise authority wi ... Read »


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    • Live, virtual, and constructive

    • Live, Virtual, and Constructive (LVC) Simulation is a broadly used taxonomy for classifying Models and Simulation (M&S). However, categorizing a simulation as a live, virtual, or constructive environment is problematic since there is no clear division between these categories. The degree of human participation in a sim ... Read »


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    • Local operational picture

    • A local operational picture (LOP) is a single identical display of relevant (operational) information of the battlespace (e.g. position of own troops and enemy troops, position and status of important infrastructure such as bridges, roads, etc.) constructed for local use. A LOP is an emerging military concept. Althoug ... Read »


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    • Loss exchange ratio

    • Loss exchange ratio is a figure of merit in attrition warfare. It is usually relevant to a condition or state of war where one side depletes the resources of another through attrition. Specifically and most often used as a comparator in aerial combat, where it is known as a kill-ratio. For example, during the Korean Wa ... Read »


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    • Low rate initial production

    • Low rate initial production (LRIP) is a term commonly used in military weapon projects/programs to designate the phase of initial, small-quantity production. The prospective first buyer and operator (i.e., a country's defense authorities and the relevant military units) gets to thoroughly test the weapons system over s ... Read »


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    • Luftwaffe radio equipment (Funkgerät) of World War II


    • Y-Control for fighters

    • By late 1943 the Luftwaffe was facing multiple problems in navigation and control of its assets in the European airspace. Allied jamming of existing VHF voice radio links and MF navigation beacons was becoming extremely effective, At the same time training of pilots was being curtailed by the lack of fuel. This resulte ... Read »


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    • Mad minute

    • The Mad Minute is best known as a bolt-rifle speed shooting event, which was derived from a pre-World War I rapid-fire exercise used by British Army riflemen, using the Lee–Enfield service rifle. The exercise (Practice number 22, Rapid Fire, ‘The Musketry Regulations, Part I, 1909) required the rifleman to fi ... Read »


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    • Manning the rail

    • Manning the rail is a method of saluting or rendering honors used by naval vessels. The custom evolved from that of manning the yards, which dates from the days of sail. On sailing ships, men stood evenly spaced on all the yards (the spars holding the sails) and gave three cheers to honor distinguished persons. Today t ... Read »


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    • Marching fire

    • Marching fire, also known as walking fire, is a military tactic; a form of suppressive fire used during an infantry assault or combined arms assault. Advancing units fire their weapons without stopping to aim, in an attempt to pin down enemy defenders. Marching fire usually ends with an infantry charge to engage the en ... Read »


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    • Military brat

    • A military brat (colloquial or military slang) is the child of a person in the military. Military brats are associated with a unique subculture and cultural identity. A military brat's childhood or adolescent life may be immersed in military culture to the point where the mainstream culture of their home country may se ... Read »


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    • Military capability

    • Military capability is defined by the Australian Defence Force as "the ability to achieve a desired effect in a specific operating environment". It is defined by three interdependent factors: combat readiness, sustainable capability and force structure. In terms of technologies, weapons and equipment use, it represent ... Read »


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    • Military dependent

    • Military dependents are the spouse(s), children, and possibly other familial relationship categories of a sponsoring military member for purposes of pay as well as special benefits, privileges and rights. This generic category is enumerated in great detail for U.S. military members. The term "military brat" is also co ... Read »


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    • Military deployment

    • Military deployment is the movement of armed forces and their logistical support infrastructure around the world. The United States Military defines the term as follows: Deployment encompasses all activities from origin or home station through destination, specifically including intra-continental United States, ... Read »


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    • Military designation of days and hours

    • The military designation of days and hours within the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), is specified in AAP-6 (STANAG 3680), NATO Glossary of Terms and Definitions, and marked (NATO) in what follows. Those entries marked (US) are specific to the U.S., and defined only in Joint Publication JP 1-02, Department o ... Read »


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    • Military operations other than war

    • Military operations other than war (MOOTW) focus on deterring war, resolving conflict, promoting peace, and supporting civil authorities in response to domestic crises. The phrase and acronym were coined by the United States military during the 1990s, but it has since fallen out of use. The UK military has crafted an e ... Read »


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    • Military parlance

    • Military parlance is the vernacular used within the military and embraces all aspects of service life; it can be described as both a "code" and a "classification" of something. Like many close and closed communities, the language used can often be full of jargon and not readily intelligible to outsiders—sometimes ... Read »


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    • Military supply chain management

    • Military supply chain management is a cross-functional approach to procuring, producing and delivering products and services for military applications. The broad management scope includes sub-suppliers, suppliers, internal information and funds flow. A supply is the procurement, distribution, maintenance while in ... Read »


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    • Unmanned Aircraft System Simulation

    • Unmanned aircraft system simulation focuses on training pilots (or operators) to control an unmanned aircraft or its payload from a control station. Flight simulation involves a device that artificially re-creates aircraft flight and the environment in which it flies for pilot training, design, or other purposes. It in ... Read »


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    • Military urbanism

    • Military urbanism is the militarization of urban spaces. This can include changes to built environments in military conflict areas or modifications of cityscapes to strengthen or subvert control by authorities. Military urbanism concerns the planning and implementation processes by which areas are fortified and militar ... Read »


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    • Missing in action

    • Missing in action (MIA) is a casualty classification assigned to combatants, military chaplains, combat medics, and prisoners of war who are reported missing during wartime or ceasefire. They may have been killed, wounded, captured, or deserted. If deceased, neither their remains nor grave has been positively identifie ... Read »


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    • Mobility (military)

    • Mobility in military terms refers to the ability of a weapon system, combat unit or armed force to move toward a military objective. Combat forces with a higher mobility are able to move more quickly, and/or across more hostile terrain, than forces with lower mobility. Mobility is regarded as a vital component of the ... Read »


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    • Mobility kill

    • A mobility kill (or M-kill) in armoured warfare is a weapon or vehicle that is immobilized, or the act of immobilizing such a target. This is often caused by the vehicle triggering an anti-tank mine by driving over it, though it may also result from being hit by an rocket propelled grenade or anti-tank missile. Tanks ... Read »


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    • Model–test–model


    • Modeling and simulation

    • Modeling and simulation (M&S) refers to using models – physical, mathematical, or otherwise logical representation of a system, entity, phenomenon, or process – as a basis for simulations – methods for implementing a model (either statically or) over time – to develop data as a basis for managerial ... Read »


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    • Mokusatsu

    • Mokusatsu (黙殺?) is a Japanese noun literally meaning "kill" with "silence", and is used with a verb marker idiomatically to mean "ignore", "take no notice of" or "treat with silent contempt". It is composed of two kanji characters: 黙 (moku "silence") and 殺 (satsu "killing"). Despite being a word of ... Read »


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    • Murder board

    • A murder board, also known as a "scrub-down", is a committee of questioners set up to critically review a proposal and/or help someone prepare for a difficult oral examination. The term originated in the U.S. military, specifically from the Pentagon, but is also used in academic and government appointment contexts. NA ... Read »


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    • Muster (military)

    • The term muster designates the process or event of accounting for members in a military unit. This practice of inspections led to the coining of the English idiom , meaning being sufficient. When a unit is created, it is "mustered in," and when it is disbanded, it is "mustered out." In Tudor England, musters were peri ... Read »


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    • Naval base

    • A naval base or navy base (military port) is a military base, where warships (navy ships) and naval ships are docked when they have no mission at sea or want to restock. Usually ships may also perform some minor repairs. Some naval bases are temporary homes to aircraft that usually stay on the ships but are undergoing ... Read »


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    • Naval rating

    • A naval rating is an enlisted member of a country's navy, subordinate to warrant officers and officers hence not conferred by commission or warrant. The naval term comes from the general nautical usage of rating - a seaman's class or grade as recorded in the ship's books, whilst in the United States it is currently use ... Read »


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    • Net-centric

    • Net-centric or netcentric refers to participating as a part of a continuously-evolving, complex community of people, devices, information and services interconnected by a communications network to achieve optimal benefit of resources and better synchronization of events and their consequences. In military connotation ... Read »


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    • Non-Cooperative Target Recognition

    • Radar MASINT is one of the subdisciplines of Measurement and signature intelligence (MASINT) and refers to intelligence gathering activities that bring together disparate elements that do not fit within the definitions of Signals intelligence (SIGINT), Imagery intelligence (IMINT), or human intelligence (HUMINT). Acco ... Read »


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    • Paper command

    • A paper command is a military term for an officially established military formation that lacks the manpower or staffing normally befitting such an organization. Such commands are similar to those that are under-strength—however, a paper command generally refers to a unit that military authorities have no intention ... Read »


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    • Paramilitary

    • A paramilitary is a semi-militarized force whose organizational structure, tactics, training, subculture, and (often) function are similar to those of a professional military, but which is not included as part of a state's formal armed forces. Under the law of war, a state may incorporate a paramilitary organization o ... Read »


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    • Plausible deniability

    • Plausible deniability is the ability for persons (typically senior officials in a formal or informal chain of command) to deny knowledge of or responsibility for any damnable actions committed by others (usually subordinates in an organizational hierarchy) because of a lack of evidence that can confirm their participat ... Read »


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    • Plot (radar)

    • In naval terminology a Plot is a graphic display that shows all collated data from a ship's on-board sensors i.e. radar, sonar and EW systems. They also displayed information from external sources i.e. other vessel or aircraft reports. There are four different types of plot, each with varying capabilities i.e. range, d ... Read »


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    • Point target

    • A point target is: Targets such as city buildings, and targets in the midst of many non-targets are considered to be point targets. When attacking point targets, weapons with only the necessary amount of spread and power are employed. Point targets are often located near other buildings which contain civilians and ot ... Read »


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    • Potential superpowers

    • Potential superpowers

      A potential superpower is a state or a political and economic entity that is speculated to be, or is in the process of becoming, a superpower at some point during the 21st century. Currently, only the United States fulfills the criteria to be considered a superpower. States most commonly described as being potential ... Read »


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    • Progressive war

    • Progressive war is a military strategy where only enemy combatants are targeted and non-combatants killed or wounded due to collateral damage are kept to a minimum. The principles for Progressive War were established by Dutch jurist Hugo Grotius who is consider a founder of international law in his book De jure belli a ... Read »


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    • Psc (British Army)

    • PSC stands for Passed Staff College in Commonwealth militaries of Britain, Bangladesh, Indian, Sri Lanka and Pakistan. Used as post-nominal letters it indicates that the officer has undertake the staff officer course at a Staff College. The practice originated in the British Army where the initial psc appeared in ... Read »


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    • Pyrrhic victory

    • A Pyrrhic victory (English pronunciation: //ˌpɪɹ.ɪk ˈvɪk.t(ə)ɹ.i// or PEER-ik VIK-tree) is a victory that inflicts such a devastating toll on the victor that it is tantamount to defeat. Someone who wins a Pyrrhic victory has been victorious in some way. However, the heavy toll negates any sense ... Read »


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    • Relief (military)

    • Relief, as a military term, refers to the breaking of a siege or an encirclement by an outside force. Relief may occur in conjunction with a breakout. It is one of four possible conclusions of investment, the others being a breakout, surrender or reduction. The force that effects relief is known as the "relieving force ... Read »


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    • Relief in place

    • A relief in place is a military operation whereby the relieving unit or formation replaces the force being relieved on a more or less one-for-one basis in situ and takes over its mission and assigned zone of operations. Once the relieving forces have been briefed on the situation and ground, the relieved troops then wi ... Read »


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    • Reset (military)

    • Reset is an evolving military term currently used to describe the equipment refurbishment process. In current U.S. military terms, "reset" refers to "a series of actions to restore units to a desired level of combat capability commensurate with future mission requirements." The military term is somewhat like the f ... Read »


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    • Round-robin (document)

    • Round-robin is a document signed by multiple parties in a circle to make it more difficult to determine the order in which it was signed, thus preventing a ringleader from being identified. The term dates from the 17th-century French ruban rond (round ribbon). This described the practice of signatories to petitions ag ... Read »


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    • Roving commission

    • A roving commission details the duties of a commissioned officer or other official whose responsibilities are neither geographically nor functionally limited. Where an individual in an official position is given more freedom than would regularly be afforded to a person in the same role, they are described as having a ... Read »


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    • Salients, re-entrants and pockets

    • A salient is a battlefield feature that projects into enemy territory. The salient is surrounded by the enemy on three sides, making the troops occupying the salient vulnerable. The enemy's line facing a salient is referred to as a re-entrant (an angle pointing inwards). A deep salient is vulnerable to being "pinched o ... Read »


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    • Scorched earth

    • A scorched-earth policy is a military strategy that targets anything that might be useful to the enemy while advancing through or withdrawing from an area. Specifically, all of the assets that are used or can be used by the enemy are targeted, such as food sources, transportation, communications, industrial resources, ... Read »


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    • Search and destroy

    • Search and Destroy, Seek and Destroy, or even simply S&D, refers to a military strategy that became a large component of the Malayan Emergency and the Vietnam War. The idea was to insert ground forces into hostile territory, search out the enemy, destroy them, and withdraw immediately afterward. The strategy was the re ... Read »


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    • Shoulder mark

    • A shoulder mark, also called an epaulette, shoulder board, rank slide, or slip-on , is a flat cloth sleeve worn on the shoulder strap of a uniform. It may bear rank or other insignia. The newer Auscam uniform design lacks shoulder marks, instead opting for a vertical strap in the middle of the chest region of the ... Read »


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    • Signal operating instructions

    • Signal operating instructions (SOI) or Communications-Electronics Operation Instructions (CEOI) are U.S. military terms for a type of combat order issued for the technical control and coordination of communications within a command. They include current and up-to-date information covering radio call signs and frequenci ... Read »


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    • Simulation-based acquisition

    • In the USA the Director for Test Systems Engineering and Evaluation (DTSE&E) commissioned in 1995 a one-year study to assess the effectiveness of the use of M&S in weapon systems acquisition and support processes. The DTSE&E study developed an approach to acquisition which was named simulation-based acquisition (SBA). ... Read »


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    • Site Exploitation

    • Site Exploitation is a military term used by the United States to describe "collecting information, material, and persons from a designated location and analyzing them to answer information requirements, facilitate subsequent operations, or support criminal prosecution." Also called tactical site exploitation or sensi ... Read »


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    • Soft target

    • A "soft target" is "a person or thing that is relatively unprotected or vulnerable, especially to military or terrorist attack." The terms "soft target" and "hard target" are flexible in nature and the distinction between the two is not always clear. However, typical "soft targets" are civilian sites where people cong ... Read »


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    • Sortie

    • A sortie (from the French word meaning ) is a deployment or dispatch of one military unit, be it an aircraft, ship, or troops, from a strongpoint. The sortie, whether by one or more aircraft or vessels, usually has a specific mission. The sortie rate is the number of sorties that a given unit can support in a given tim ... Read »


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    • Special Mission Unit

    • The term Special Mission Unit or Special Missions Unit (SMU) is used to describe some elitespecial operations forces around the world. The term has been applied to the Australian Defence Force's Special Air Service Regiment and five United States special operations forces units. Special mission units have been involved ... Read »


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    • Staff ride

    • The term staff ride describes three different types of exercise, each of which is conducted on a particular piece of ground: The classic staff ride (a direct translation of the German term Stabs-Reise) is a technique made famous by Helmuth von Moltke the Elder in the second half of the nineteenth century. While se ... Read »


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    • Standard operating procedure

    • A standard operating procedure, or SOP, is a set of step-by-step instructions compiled by an organization to help workers carry out routine operations. SOPs aim to achieve efficiency, quality output and uniformity of performance, while reducing miscommunication and failure to comply with industry regulations. The mili ... Read »


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    • Static Weather

    • A Static Weather is the representation of weather (e.g. Precipitation (meteorology), fog, wind) that is uniform through the simulation battlespace (e.g. the entire simulation battlespace has fog). ... Read »


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    • Stomach division

    • In military terminology, a stomach division is a unit created for the purpose of containing combatants of disuse in the front lines. Its name originates from its original conception, in which men suffering from stomach illnesses were moved to a single division to avoid spreading disease further. The German 70th Infant ... Read »


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    • Strategic communication

    • Strategic communication can mean either communicating a concept, a process, or data that satisfies a long term strategic goal of an organization by allowing facilitation of advanced planning, or communicating over long distances usually using international telecommunications or dedicated global network assets to coordi ... Read »


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    • Strike off Strength

    • Taken on Strength is a British and British Commonwealth term referring to a person being added to a military organization, or in some cases becoming an employee of a government department, agency or statutory corporation. For an aircraft or a vessel, it is the date put into operational service. To Strike off Strengt ... Read »


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    • Superpower

    • Superpower is a term used to describe a state with a dominant position, which is characterised by its extensive ability to exert influence or project power on a global scale. This is done through the combined-means of technological, cultural, military and economic strength, as well as diplomatic international relations ... Read »


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    • Suppressive fire

    • In military science, suppressive fire (commonly called covering fire) is "fire that degrades the performance of an enemy force below the level needed to fulfill its mission". Suppression is usually only effective for the duration of the fire". It is one of three types of fire support, which is defined by NATO as "the a ... Read »


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    • Surgical strike

    • A surgical strike is a military attack which results in, was intended to result in, or is claimed to have resulted in only damage to the intended legitimate military target, and no or minimal collateral damage to surrounding structures, vehicles, buildings, or the general public infrastructure and utilities. A swi ... Read »


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    • Sustainment (military)

    • Military logistics is the discipline of planning and carrying out the movement and maintenance of military forces. In its most comprehensive sense, it is those aspects or military operations that deal with: The word "logistics" is derived from the Greek adjective logistikos meaning "skilled in calculating". The fi ... Read »


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    • Synthetic natural environment

    • A Synthetic Natural Environment (SNE) is the representation in a synthetic environment of the physical world within which all models of military systems exist and interact (i.e. climate, weather, terrain, oceans, space, etc.). It includes both data and models representing the elements of the environment, their effects ... Read »


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    • Synthetic psychological environment

    • In a synthetic environment, Synthetic Psychological Environment (SPE) (or rules of behavior) refers to the representation (i.e. modeling) of influences to individuals and groups as a result of culture (e.g. demography, law, religion)). SPE is known by many names including: A few models that represent aspects of S ... Read »


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    • Tactical Air Control Party

    • The Tactical Air Control Party, commonly abbreviated TACP, is a small team of Air Force or Marine personnel who provide airspace deconfliction and terminal control of close air support at battle group level or below. It usually consists of an officer Forward Air Controller (FAC), a senior non-commissioned officer (SNCO ... Read »


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    • Tactical bombing

    • Tactical bombing is aerial bombing aimed at targets of immediate military value, such as combatants, military installations, or military equipment. This is in contrast to strategic bombing, or attacking enemy cities and factories to cripple future military production and enemy civilians' will to support the war effort, ... Read »


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    • Take point

    • In modern military parlance, to take point, walk point, be on point, or be a point man means to assume the first and most exposed position in a combat military formation, that is, the leading soldier or unit advancing through hostile or unsecured territory. The term can be applied to infantry or mechanized columns. The ... Read »


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    • Taken on Strength

    • Taken on Strength is a British and British Commonwealth term referring to a person being added to a military organization, or in some cases becoming an employee of a government department, agency or statutory corporation. For an aircraft or a vessel, it is the date put into operational service. To Strike off Strengt ... Read »


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    • Target acquisition

    • Target acquisition is the detection, identification, and location of a target in sufficient detail to permit the effective employment of lethal and non-lethal means. The term is used for a broad area of applications. A "target" here is an entity or object considered for possible engagement or other action (see Targeti ... Read »


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    • CARVER matrix

    • The CARVER matrix was developed by the United States special operations forces during the Vietnam War. CARVER is an acronym that stands for Criticality, Accessibility, Recuperability, Vulnerability, Effect and Recognizability and is a system to identify and rank specific targets so that attack resources can be efficien ... Read »


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    • Target of opportunity

    • A target of opportunity is a target "visible to a surface or air sensor or observer, which is within range of available weapons and against which fire has not been scheduled or requested." A target of opportunity comes in two forms; "unplanned and unanticipated". In preparation for most ordinary combat military op ... Read »


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    • Terminate with extreme prejudice

    • In military and other covert operations, terminate with extreme prejudice is a euphemism for aggressive execution (playing on the expression "termination with prejudice" of an employment contract). In a military intelligence context, it is generally understood as an order to assassinate. Its meaning was explained in a ... Read »


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    • Test and Training Enabling Architecture

    • Test and Training Enabling Architecture (TENA) is an architecture designed to bring interoperability to United States Department of Defense test and training systems. TENA is designed to promote integrated testing and simulation-based acquisition through the use of a large-scale, distributed, real-time synthetic enviro ... Read »


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    • Three Block War

    • The Three Block War is a concept described by U.S. Marine General Charles Krulak in the late 1990s to illustrate the complex spectrum of challenges likely to be faced by Marines on the modern battlefield. In Krulak's example, Marines may be required to conduct full scale military action, peacekeeping operations and hum ... Read »


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    • Time-late

    • Time-late is a term used primarily in naval warfare that refers to the time lag between some datum's generation and actions taken based on it. In other words, it is something that is not It is often used in the context of a weapon's time of flight: the time between launch and (intended) contact with a target results ... Read »


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    • Tour of duty

    • For military soldiers, a tour of duty is usually a period of time spent in combat or in a hostile environment. For example, in World War II a tour of duty for a Royal Air Force (RAF) bomber crewman was 30 flights. That number could take up to 12 months. In navies, a tour of duty is a period of time spent performing op ... Read »


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    • Transition to war

    • Transition to war (TTW) is a North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) military term referring to a period of international tension during which government and society move to an open (but not necessarily declared) war footing. The period after this is considered to be war, conventional or otherwise, but the term TTW f ... Read »


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    • Traverse (trench warfare)

    • A traverse in trench warfare is an adaptation to reduce casualties to defenders occupying a trench. One form of traverse is a U-shaped detour in the trench with the trench going around a protrusion formed of earth and sandbags. The fragments or shrapnel, or shockwave from a shell landing and exploding within a trench t ... Read »


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    • Urban terrain

    • Urban terrain is a military term for the representation of the urban environment within the context of urban warfare. Urban terrain includes buildings, roads, highways, ports, rails, airports, subways, and sewage lines. Mouse-holing is one military technique used to overcome some of the physical barriers within the ur ... Read »


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    • Vallon Man

    • Vallon Man is a term used by the British Army waging war in Afghanistan to denote the soldier in a patrol who carries the mine detector. The term originated from "Vallon Machine", another word used for mine detector (the Vallon mine detector VMR3 was widely used in Afghanistan because of its unique ground penetrating r ... Read »


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    • Wapenshaw

    • A wapenshaw, or wapinshaw,(from the Old English for "weapon show") was originally a gathering and review of troops formerly held in every district in Scotland. The object was to satisfy the military chiefs that the arms of their retainers were in good condition and that the men were properly trained in their use. ... Read »


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    • War bond

    • War bonds are debt securities issued by a government to finance military operations and other expenditure in times of war. In practice, modern governments finance war by putting additional money into circulation, and the function of the bonds is to remove money from circulation and help to control inflation. War bonds ... Read »


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    • Warning shot

    • Warning shot

      Warning Shot is a 1967 film about a police sergeant who kills a man while on a stakeout, then must prove that it was self-defense. It is based on the novel 711 - Officer Needs Help by Whit Masterson. David Janssen stars as the accused officer, with supporting performances from Ed Begley, Keenan Wynn, Joan Collins, Ste ... Read »


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    • Wartime reserve mode

    • Wartime reserve modes abbreviated as WARM are military procedures held in reserve for wartime or emergency use. They concern the characteristics and operating procedures of sensor, communications, navigation aids, threat recognition, weapons, and countermeasures systems. Since the military effectiveness of these proced ... Read »


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    • Weapon storage area

    • Weapon storage areas (WSA), also known as special ammunition storage (SAS), were extremely well guarded and well defended locations where United States and NATO nuclear weapons were stored during the Cold War era. In most situations, the WSA or SAS areas were located inside the perimeter of an army barracks or an air ... Read »


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    • Weapons Tight

    • Weapons Tight is a NATO brevity code "weapon control order" used in anti-aircraft warfare, imposing a status whereby weapons systems may only be fired at targets confirmed as hostile. Compare to Weapons Hold, whereby it is ordered that weapons may only be fired at targets (especially aircraft or missiles) when under a ... Read »


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    • World War II Allied names for Japanese aircraft

    • The World War II Allied names for Japanese aircraft were reporting names, often described as codenames, given by Allied personnel to Imperial Japanese aircraft during the Pacific campaign of World War II. The names were used by Allied personnel to identify aircraft operated by the Japanese for reporting and descriptive ... Read »


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    • Wounded in action

    • Wounded in action (WIA) describes combatants who have been wounded while fighting in a combat zone during wartime, but have not been killed. Typically it implies that they are temporarily or permanently incapable of bearing arms or continuing to fight. For the U.S. military, becoming WIA in combat generally results in ... Read »


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  • What Else?

    • Military terminology

Extras