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  • Military life

    Military life

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    • Barracks

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    • Battle cries

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    • Bugle calls

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    • Military food

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    • Military memoirs

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    • Militaria

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    • Military brats

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    • Military chapels

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    • Military education and training

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    • Military humor

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    • Military parades

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    • Military pidgins

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    • Military slang and jargon

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    • Military oaths

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    • Military pay and benefits

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    • Military traditions

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    • United States Army physical fitness

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    • 21-gun salute

    • A 21-gun salute is the most commonly recognized of the customary gun salutes that are performed by the firing of cannons or artillery as a military honor. The custom stems from naval tradition, where a warship would fire its cannons harmlessly out to sea, until all ammunition was spent, to show that it was disarmed, s ... Read »


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    • Airman's coin


    • Alert state

    • The phrase alert state is used in more than one professional discipline. The phrase alert state is used in milieu variously, although in a capitalized form the reference is of an indication of the state of readiness of the armed forces for military action or a State against terrorism or military attack. The term f ... Read »


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    • Armed Forces Day (United Kingdom)

    • Armed Forces Day (United Kingdom)

      Armed Forces Day (formerly Veterans' Day) in the United Kingdom is an annual event celebrated in late June to commemorate the service of men and women in the British Armed Forces. Veterans' Day was first observed in 2006. Although an official event, it is not a public holiday in the UK. The name was changed to Armed Fo ... Read »


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    • Assembly (bugle call)

    • Assembly is a bugle call that signals troops to assemble at a designated place. "Assembly and "Adjutant's Call" are the two bugle calls that make up the "formation" category of bugle call. ... Read »


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    • Ayers Kaserne

    • Ayers Kaserne at Kirch-Göns, Germany (coordinates: 50° 28' 46.08" N 8° 38' 41.83" E) was a U.S. Army installation built in 1952 as part of the major construction efforts under the U.S. Army troop augmentation program of the early 1950s, occupied by the 22nd Regimental Combat Team of the Fourth infantry Divisio ... Read »


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    • Military base

    • A military base is a facility directly owned and operated by or for the military or one of its branches that shelters military equipment and personnel, and facilitates training and operations. In general, a military base provides accommodations for one or more units, but it may also be used as a command center, a train ... Read »


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    • Batman (military)

    • A batman is a soldier or airman assigned to a commissioned officer as a personal servant. Before the advent of motorized transport, an officer's batman was also in charge of the officer's "bat-horse" that carried the pack saddle with his officer's kit during a campaign. The U.K. English term is derived from the obsole ... Read »


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    • Battle buddy

    • A battle buddy is a partner assigned to a soldier in the United States Army. Each battle buddy is expected to assist his or her partner both in and out of combat. Most participating soldiers have reported satisfaction and have agreed that the Army should implement the system fully, although there have been cons reporte ... Read »


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    • Battle drill

    • An Infantry battle drill describes how platoons and squads apply fire and maneuver to commonly encountered situations. They require leaders to make decisions rapidly and to issue brief oral orders quickly. "Battle Drill", according to the manual Fieldcraft and Battle Drill, means the reduction of military tactics to b ... Read »


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    • Bed-making

    • Bed-making is the act of arranging the bedsheets and other bedding on a bed, to prepare it for use. It is a household chore, but is also performed in establishments including hospitals, hotels, and military or educational residences. Bed-making is also a common childhood chore. Beds must sometimes be made to exacting ... Read »


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    • Boatswain's call


    • Bugle call

    • A bugle call is a short tune, originating as a military signal announcing scheduled and certain non-scheduled events on a military installation, battlefield, or ship. Historically, bugles, drums, and other loud musical instruments were used for clear communication in the noise and confusion of a battlefield. Naval bugl ... Read »


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    • Bullying in the military

    • In 2000, the UK Ministry of Defence (MOD) defined bullying as: "...the use of physical strength or the abuse of authority to intimidate or victimise others, or to give unlawful punishments." A review of a number of deaths, supposedly by suicide, at Princess Royal Barracks, Deepcut by Nicholas Blake QC indicated that wh ... Read »


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    • Canadian Forces Administrative Orders

    • Canadian Forces Administrative Orders (CFAOs) are issued to "supplement and amplify the Queen's Regulations and Orders (QR&O)...[they] contain administrative policy, procedures and information of continuing effect." CFAO 1-1 CFAOs are currently in the process of being superseded by Defence Administrative Orders and D ... Read »


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    • Canteen Stores Department (India)

    • Canteen Stores Department

      The Canteen Stores Department, (CSD), is a solely owned Government of India Enterprise under Ministry of Defence and has its depot in all major military bases operated by the Indian Armed Forces. CSD are the most profitable retail chain in India, ahead of Future & Reliance Retail and sell a wide variety of products li ... Read »


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    • Cashiering

    • Cashiering (or degradation ceremony), generally within military forces, is a ritual dismissal of an individual from some position of responsibility for a breach of discipline. From the Flemish 'Kasseren' the phrase entered the English language in the late 16th century, during the wars in the Low Countries. Although the ... Read »


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    • Celebratory gunfire

    • Celebratory gunfire (also called aerial firing or happy fire) is the shooting of a firearm into the air in celebration. It is culturally accepted in parts of the Balkans, the Middle East, the Central Asian region of Afghanistan, and the South Asian regions of Pakistan and Northern India. In regions such as Puerto Rico ... Read »


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    • Challenge coin

    • A challenge coin is a small coin or medallion (usually military), bearing an organization’s insignia or emblem and carried by the organization’s members. Traditionally, they are given to prove membership when challenged and to enhance morale. In addition, they are also collected by service members. In practic ... Read »


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    • Change of command (military)

    • A change of command is a military tradition that represents a formal transfer of authority and responsibility for a unit from one commanding or flag officer to another. The passing of colors, standards, or ensigns from an outgoing commander to an incoming one ensures that the unit and its soldiers is never without offi ... Read »


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    • Color guard

    • In military organizations, the Colour Guard (or Color Guard) refers to a detachment of soldiers assigned to the protection of regimental colours. This duty is so prestigious that the colour is generally carried by a young officer (Ensign), while experienced non-commissioned officers (Colour sergeants) are assigned to t ... Read »


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    • Command hierarchy

    • Command hierarchy

      A command hierarchy is a group of people who carry out orders based on authority within the group.. It can be viewed as part of a power structure, in which it is usually seen as the most vulnerable and also the most powerful part. In a military context, the chain of command is the line of authority and responsibil ... Read »


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    • Commissary (store)

    • A commissary is a for . The United States Defense Commissary Agency operates commissaries that are similar to supermarkets, providing service members with most of the same available in the United States regardless of where they are stationed abroad. Commissaries sell primarily grocery articles; other items can be purc ... Read »


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    • Defense Manpower Data Center

    • The Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) serves under the Office of the Secretary of Defense to collate personnel, manpower, training, financial, and other data for the Department of Defense. This data catalogues the history of personnel in the military and their family for purposes of healthcare, retirement funding and ... Read »


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    • Dog tag

    • "Dog tags" is an informal term for the identification tags worn by military personnel, because of their resemblance to animal registration tags. The tags are primarily used for the identification of dead and wounded soldiers; they have personal info about the soldiers and convey essential basic medical information, suc ... Read »


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    • Drill commands

    • Drill commands are generally used with a group that is marching, most often in military foot drill or marching band. All branches of the military use drill commands. Drill commands are best given in an excellent command voice. A command voice is characterized by DLIPS: Distinctness, Loudness, Inflection, Projectio ... Read »


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    • Drill instructor

    • A Drill Instructor is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces or police forces with specific duties that vary by country. For example, in the United States armed forces, they are assigned the duty of training new recruits entering the military. Drill instructors within the U.S. armed forces have different title ... Read »


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    • Drumming out

    • Drumming out is the historical act of being dishonorably dismissed from military service to the sound of a drum. In modern figurative usage, in which the term is sometimes altered to "drub[bing/bed/etc.] out," it may refer to any act of expulsion or dismissal in disgrace. One of the earliest recorded references to ... Read »


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    • Dumb insolence

    • Dumb insolence is an offence against military discipline in which a subordinate displays an attitude of towards a superior without open disagreement. It is also found in settings such as education in which obedience and deference to a teacher is expected but may be refused by unruly pupils. For example, a pupil may su ... Read »


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    • Duty officer

    • Duty officer is the name of a rotating position assigned to a junior military officer in a duty or watch system. The duty officer is charged with responsibility for a military unit and acts as the commanding officer's representative. The duty officer attends to menial tasks for the commanding officer such as being at t ... Read »


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    • Dwell time (military)

    • In the military, dwell time is the amount of time that service members spend in their home station between deployments to war zones, or to dependent restricted tours. Dwell time is designed to allow service members a mental and physical break from combat and to give them time with their families. It is an important com ... Read »


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    • End Of Active Service

    • End of Active Service (EAS) is the conclusion of the period of active duty commitment for a member of the United States military. This date can be changed by reenlistment, extension, retirement, renewal of active orders, and administrative separation, among other things. This is not to be confused with Expiration of C ... Read »


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    • Epaulette

    • Epaulette (/ˈɛpəlɛt/; also spelled epaulet) is a type of ornamental shoulder piece or decoration used as insignia of rank by armed forces and other organizations. In several European armies, epaulettes are also worn by all ranks of elite or ceremonial units when on parade. Epaulettes are fastened to the sh ... Read »


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    • Exceptional Family Member Program

    • The Exceptional Family Member Program or EFMP is a mandatory U.S. Department of Defense enrollment program that works with other military and civilian agencies to provide comprehensive and coordinated community support, housing, educational, medical, and personnel services worldwide to U.S. military families with speci ... Read »


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    • Exhibition drill

    • Exhibition drill is a variant of drill that involves complex marching sequences which usually deviate from drill used in the course of ordinary parades. Teams performing exhibition drill are often affiliated with military units, but the scope of exhibition drill is not limited to military drill teams. Exhibition drill ... Read »


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    • Family Readiness Group

    • Within the United States Army, the United States Army Reserve, and the Army National Guard communities, a Family Readiness Group (FRG) is a command-sponsored organization of family members, volunteers, soldiers and civilian employees associated with a particular unit. They are normally organized at company and battalio ... Read »


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    • Fatigue duty

    • Fatigue duty is the labor assigned to military men that does not require the use of armament. Parties sent on fatigue duty were known in English by the French term "detachemens" according to an 1805 military dictionary. The term is recorded in America in 1776, and in an 1805 British military dictionary. In the United ... Read »


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    • Feu de joie

    • A feu de joie (French: "fire of joy") is a celebratory rifle salute, described as a "running fire of guns." As soldiers fire into the air sequentially in rapid succession, the cascade of blank rounds produces a characteristic "rat-tat-tat" effect. It is used on rare landmark occasions of national rejoicing. During the ... Read »


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    • Flypast

    • FlyPast is an aircraft magazine, published monthly, edited by Chris Gilson and Steve Beebee. The magazine started as a bi-monthly edition in May/June 1981 and its first editor was the late Mike Twite. It is owned by Key Publishing Ltd of Stamford, Lincolnshire, and the magazine's main former editor until 2010 was ... Read »


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    • French leave

    • French leave is "leave of absence without permission or without announcing one's departure", including leaving a party without bidding farewell to the host. The intent behind this behaviour is to leave without disturbing or upsetting the host. The phrase is first recorded in 1771 and was born at a time when the Englis ... Read »


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    • High and tight

    • The high and tight is a military variant of the crew cut. It is a very short hairstyle most commonly worn by men in the armed forces of the U.S. It is also popular with law enforcement officers and other public safety personnel. Although "high and tight" is a term commonly used within the military and law enforcement c ... Read »


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    • Honor guard

    • An honor guard, or ceremonial guard, is a ceremonial unit, usually military in nature. A primary role for honor guards in the United States and some other countries is to provide funeral honors for fallen comrades and to guard national monuments. An honor guard may also serve as the "guardians of the colors" by displa ... Read »


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    • Hot racking

    • Hot racking (also known as hot bunking or hot bedding) is the sanctioned practice within military organizations of assigning more than one crew member to a bed or "rack" to reduce berthing (sleeping) space. The practice dates back at least to the sixteenth century, and today is particularly applied aboard submarines, w ... Read »


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    • Induction cut

    • An induction cut is the shortest possible hairstyle without shaving the head with a razor. The style is so named as it is traditionally the first haircut given to new male recruits during initial entry into many of the world's armed forces, but most particularly in the United States. The induction haircut has both pra ... Read »


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    • Kaserne

    • Kaserne is a loanword taken from the German word Kaserne (plural: Kasernen), which translates as "barracks". It is the typical term used when naming the garrison location for American and Canadian forces stationed in Germany. American forces were also sometimes housed in installations simply referred to as "barracks", ... Read »


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    • KP duty

    • KP duty is "kitchen police" or "kitchen patrol" work under the kitchen staff assigned to junior U.S. enlisted military personnel. "KP" can be either the work or the personnel assigned to perform such work. In the latter sense it can be used for either military or civilian personnel assigned or hired for duties in the m ... Read »


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    • Last Post

    • The "Last Post" is either a B♭ bugle call within British infantry regiments or an E♭ cavalry trumpet call in British cavalry and Royal Regiment of Artillery (Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Artillery) used at Commonwealth military funerals and ceremonies commemorating those who have been killed in war. Its du ... Read »


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    • Leave (military)

    • In military forces, leave is a permission to be away from one's unit, either for a specified or unspecified period of time. The term AWOL, standing for absent without leave, is a term for desertion used in armed forces of many English speaking countries. Various militaries have specific rules that regulate leaves. B ... Read »


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    • Marching

    • Marching refers to an organized, uniformed, steady and rhythmic walking forward, usually associated with military troops. Marching is often performed to march music, and often associated with military parades. Marching is part of basic training in the military in most countries. In most cases, marching uses a system ... Read »


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    • Marine Corps Key Volunteer Network

    • The Key Volunteer Network (KVN) was an official United States Marine Corps family readiness program. The network consists of Marine spouses called Key Volunteers and they serve in both active duty and reserve units. KVs receive formal training either from classes on base or on-line and are appointed by the unit Command ... Read »


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    • Mess

    • A mess or mess hall (also called a messdeck aboard ships) is an area where military personnel socialize, eat, and (in some cases) live. In some societies this military usage has extended to other disciplined services eateries such as civilian fire fighting and police forces. The root of mess is the Old French mes, "por ... Read »


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    • Mess dress

    • Mess dress is the military term for the formal worn by military officers in the mess or at other formal occasions. It is also known as mess uniform and, more informally, as mess kit. It frequently consists of a mess jacket and trousers worn with a formal shirt and other formal accessories, though the exact form varies ... Read »


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    • Military abuse

    • Abuse is the improper usage or treatment of an entity, often to unfairly or improperly gain benefit. Abuse can come in many forms, such as: physical or verbal maltreatment, injury, assault, violation, rape, unjust practices, crimes, or other types of aggression. Abuse of authority, in the form of political corruption, ... Read »


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    • Military brat

    • A military brat (colloquial or military slang) is the child of a person in the military. Military brats are associated with a unique subculture and cultural identity. A military brat's childhood or adolescent life may be immersed in military culture to the point where the mainstream culture of their home country may se ... Read »


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    • Military brat (U.S. subculture)

    • "Military brat" and various "brat" derivatives describe the child of a parent or parents serving full-time in the United States Armed Forces, and can also refer to the subculture and lifestyle of such families. The term refers to both current and former children of such families. The military brat lifestyle typically ... Read »


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    • Military courtesy

    • Military courtesy is one of the defining features of a professional military force. The courtesies form a strict and sometimes elaborate code of conduct. Military courtesy is an extension and a formalization of courtesies practiced in a culture's everyday life. It is intended to reinforce discipline and the chain of c ... Read »


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    • Military dependent

    • Military dependents are the spouse(s), children, and possibly other familial relationship categories of a sponsoring military member for purposes of pay as well as special benefits, privileges and rights. This generic category is enumerated in great detail for U.S. military members. The term "military brat" is also co ... Read »


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    • Military discharge

    • A military discharge is given when a member of the armed forces is released from his or her obligation to serve. Each country's military has different types of discharge. They are generally based on whether the person completed their training and then fully and satisfactorily completed their term of service or not. Oth ... Read »


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    • Military funeral

    • A military funeral is a memorial or burial rite given by a country's military for a soldier, sailor, marine or airman who died in battle, a veteran, or other prominent military figures or heads of state. A military funeral may feature guards of honor, the firing of volley shots as a salute, drumming and other military ... Read »


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    • Military funerals in the United States

    • A military funeral in the United States is a memorial or burial rite given by the U.S. military for a Soldier, Marine, Sailor, Coast Guardsman, or Airman who died in battle, a veteran, or other prominent military figures or a president. A military funeral may feature guards of honor, the firing of volley shots as a sal ... Read »


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    • Military OneSource

    • Military OneSource is a U.S. Department of Defense program that provides resources and support to active-duty, National Guard and Reserve service members and their families anywhere in the world. The program is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at no cost to users. Military OneSource services include: Milit ... Read »


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    • Military psychology

    • Military psychology is the research, design and application of psychological theories and empirical data towards understanding, predicting, and countering behaviours either in friendly or enemy forces or civilian population that may be undesirable, threatening or potentially dangerous to the conduct of military operati ... Read »


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    • Military town

    • A military town is a civilian municipality which is economically dependent upon or receives its greatest economic impetus from a nearby military installation, such as a military base or military academy. ... Read »


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    • Julia Compton Moore

    • Julia Compton Moore (February 10, 1929 – April 18, 2004) was the wife of Hal Moore, a United States Army officer. Her efforts and complaints in the aftermath of the Battle of Ia Drang prompted the U.S. Army to set up survivor support networks and casualty notification teams consisting of uniformed officers, whi ... Read »


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    • Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes

    • The Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes (NAAFI /ˈnæfiː/) is an organisation created by the British government in 1921 to run recreational establishments needed by the British Armed Forces, and to sell goods to servicemen and their families. It runs clubs, bars, shops, supermarkets, launderettes, restaurants, c ... Read »


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    • Non-commissioned officer

    • A non-commissioned officer or noncommissioned officer (NCO, colloquially non-com or noncom) is a military officer who has not earned a commission. Such is also called sub-officer in some countries. Non-commissioned officers, in the English-speaking world, usually obtain their position of authority by promotion through ... Read »


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    • Ode of Remembrance

    • The "Ode of Remembrance" is an ode taken from Laurence Binyon's poem, "For the Fallen", which was first published in The Times in September 1914. For the Fallen was specifically composed in honour of the casualties of the British Expeditionary Force, which by then already suffered severely at the Battle of Mons an ... Read »


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    • One Station Unit Training

    • One Station Unit Training, sometimes referred to as One Site Unit Training, is a term used by the United States Army to refer to a training program in which recruits remain with the same unit for both Basic Combat Training (BCT) and Advanced Individual Training (AIT). Immediately following Basic Training, the unit seam ... Read »


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    • Operation Military Kids

    • Operation Military Kids is a program targeted to the children of members of the United States Armed Forces who are deployed overseas. Operation Military Kids, through a cooperation with 4-H, the United States National Guard and the U.S. Army Reserve, was a program created a community support network for military youth ... Read »


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    • Military ordinariate

    • A military ordinariate is an ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Church, of the Latin or an Eastern Church, responsible for the pastoral care of Catholics serving in the armed forces of a nation. Until 1986, they were called "military vicariates" and had a status similar to that of apostolic vicariates, ... Read »


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    • Pace stick

    • A pace stick is a long stick usually carried by warrant officer and non-commissioned officer drill instructors in the British and Commonwealth armed forces and police forces as a symbol of authority and as an aid to military drill. A pace stick usually consists of two pieces of wood, hinged at the top, and tapering to ... Read »


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    • Platoon guide

    • A platoon guide is a position, but not a rank, in the United States Army and Marine Corps. The guide sets the direction and cadence of the march. In an infantry platoon the platoon guide is a non commissioned officer (by Table of Organization [TO] a sergeant in the US Marine Corps) who acts as an assistant platoon ser ... Read »


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    • Present arms (command)

    • Present arms is a two-part drill command used by many militaries in the world as a sign of respect. It comes from the old British command "Arms to the present!" This was used especially between 1700 and about the late nineteenth century in Great Britain and later the United Kingdom. Within the Australian Defence F ... Read »


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    • Presentation of the Flag

    • The Presentation of the Flag is a traditional practice of the rites of military funerals in the United States and several other countries. The flag which is to be presented is draped over the casket of the soldier or sailor being laid to rest, a practice dating back to the Napoleonic Wars when the dead were carrie ... Read »


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    • R&R (military)


    • Recall (bugle call)

    • Recall is a bugle call used to signal to soldiers that duties or drills are to cease, or to indicate that a period of relaxation should end. Outside of a military context, it is used to signal when a game should end, such as a game of capture the flag among scouts. Like other bugle calls, "recall" is a short tune that ... Read »


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    • Recruit training

    • Recruit training, more commonly known as basic training and colloquially called boot camp, is the initial instruction given to new military personnel, enlisted and officer. After completion of basic training, new recruits undergo Advanced Individual Training (AIT), where they learn the skills needed for their military ... Read »


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    • REDCON

    • In the U.S. military, the term REDCON is short for Readiness Condition and is used to refer to a unit's readiness to respond to and engage in combat operations. There are five REDCON levels, as described below in this excerpt from Army Field Manual 71-1. ... Read »


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    • Remembrance Day

    • Remembrance Day

      Remembrance Day (sometimes known informally as Poppy Day) is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth of Nations member states since the end of the First World War to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty. Following a tradition inaugurated by King George V in 1919, the day is also ... Read »


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    • Reveille

    • "Reveille" (US: /ˈrɛvəli/ REV-ə-lee; UK: /rəˈvæli/ rə-VAL-ee) is a bugle call, trumpet call or pipes call most often associated with the military and prisons; it is chiefly used to wake military personnel and prisoners at sunrise. The name comes from réveille (or réveil), the French word f ... Read »


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    • The Rouse

    • "The Rouse" is a bugle call most often associated with the military in Commonwealth countries. It is commonly played following "Last Post" at military services, and is often mistakenly referred to as "Reveille". Despite often being referred to by the name "Reveille", "The Rouse" is actually a separate piece of music f ... Read »


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    • Ruffles and flourishes

    • Ruffles and flourishes in the United States of America are preceding fanfare for honors music (ceremonial music for distinguished people). Ruffles are played on drums, and flourishes are played on bugles. For example, the President of the United States receives four ruffles and flourishes before "Hail to the Chief." F ... Read »


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    • Salute

    • A salute is a gesture or other action used to display respect. Salutes are primarily associated with armed forces, but other organisations and civilians also use salutes. In military traditions of various times and places, there have been numerous methods of performing salutes, using hand gestures, cannon or rifle ... Read »


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    • Scott Tattoo

    • "Scott Tattoo" is a bugle call entitled "The Tattoo" first published in 1835, and thought to be the source of the bugle call known as "Taps". The call was published in musical notation in an American military manual written by Major General Winfield Scott, first published in 1835. The term "Scott Tattoo" was coine ... Read »


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    • See Here, Private Hargrove

    • See Here, Private Hargrove (1942) is a book by journalist Marion Hargrove about the author's experiences as a soldier in the U.S. Army during World War II. The light-hearted book was a hit with readers, and spent 15 weeks atop the New York Times best-seller list. It was still in print 50 years after its original public ... Read »


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    • Service number

    • A service number is an identification code used to identify a person within a large group. Service numbers are most often associated with the military; however, they may be used in civilian term as well. Social Security Numbers may be seen as types of service numbers. The term "serial number" is often seen as synonym ... Read »


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    • Service number (United States Air Force)

    • United States Air Force service numbers were created in the spring of 1948, approximately six months after the Air Force's creation as separate branch of the armed forces. The first regulation of Air Force service numbers applied to numbers held by Air Force officers. In 1947, thousands of officers had automatical ... Read »


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    • Service number (United States Armed Forces)

    • Service numbers were used by the United States Armed Forces as the primary means of service member identification from 1918 until 1974. Service numbers are public information available under the Freedom of Information Act, unlike social security numbers which are protected by the Privacy Act of 1974. Each branch o ... Read »


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    • Service number (United States Army)

    • Service numbers were used by the United States Army from 1918 until 1969. Prior to this time, the Army relied on muster rolls as a means of indexing enlisted service members while officers were usually listed on yearly rolls maintained by the United States War Department. In the nineteenth century, the Army also used p ... Read »


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    • Service number (United States Coast Guard)

    • United States Coast Guard service numbers were first created in the later half of 1921. In 2004 the Coast Guard began using Employee Identification Numbers, or EMPLIDs, to replace the Social Security Number on official forms. Coast Guard officer service numbers were unique amongst the military branches in that the ... Read »


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    • Service number (United States Marine Corps)

    • United States Marine Corps service numbers were created in 1920, the same year as Navy service numbers, and were modeled after the same design. The first one hundred Marine Corps officer service numbers were intended for retroactive presentation to World War I veterans; the Marine Corps issued these early numbers ... Read »


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    • Service number (United States Navy)

    • United States Navy service numbers were created in 1920, one year after the close of the First World War. The creation of Navy service numbers coincided with those of the Marine Corps, as the Marines were under the authority of the Department of the Navy. Navy officer service numbers were simple in design since th ... Read »


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    • Serviceman

    • The term serviceman, alternatively service member, refers to non-commissioned members of armed forces. More generally, the term can be applied to officers as well. For more information see: ... Read »


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    • Sexual orientation and military service

    • LGBT personnel are able to serve in the armed forces of some countries around the world: the vast majority of industrialized, Western countries, in addition to Brazil, Chile,South Africa, Israel, and South Korea. This keeps pace with the latest global figures on acceptance of homosexuality, which suggest that toleranc ... Read »


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    • Sgt. MacKenzie

    • "Sgt. MacKenzie" is a lament written and sung by Joseph Kilna MacKenzie. It has been used in films and television, as well as covered on multiple albums. Joseph MacKenzie wrote the haunting lament after the death of his wife, Christine, and in memory of his great-grandfather, Charles Stuart MacKenzie, a sergeant i ... Read »


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    • Short-arm inspection

    • The term "short-arm inspection" is a military euphemism referring to the routine medical inspection of male soldiers' penises ("short arms") for signs of sexually-transmitted diseases and other medical problems. The precise origin of the term is uncertain; however, American and Australian troops are known to have used ... Read »


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    • Sideboy

    • A sideboy is a member of an even-numbered group of seamen posted in two rows at the quarterdeck when a visiting dignitary boards or leaves the ship, historically to help (or even hoist) him aboard, in a ceremony known as tending the Side. Presently, Sideboys are used only for ceremonial purposes and not always aboard s ... Read »


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    • Smoking in the United States military

    • Smoking in the United States military has been observed in previous wars, but smoking's close association with the United States military started in World War I when tobacco companies began to target military personnel through the distribution of cigarettes to servicemen and the eventual inclusion of cigarettes into ra ... Read »


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    • Social work in the military

    • Red Cross and similar corps of social work organizations shaped military social work. Role of military social workers were important during the World Wars. Over one million soldiers were admitted to American Army hospitals for neuro-psychiatric problems in each wars. Commissioned status for social workers were achieved ... Read »


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    • Soldier

    • Soldier

      A soldier is one who fights as part of an organised, land-based armed force. A soldier can be an enlisted person, a non-commissioned officer, or an officer. The word soldier derives from the Middle English word soudeour, from Old French soudeer or soudeour, meaning mercenary, from soudee, meaning shilling's worth ... Read »


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    • Soldiers poem

    • The Soldier's Poem is a common military saying, representing the hardships a military service member must endure. The Quote often refers to World War II, although now it has grown to represent any wartime fight. And When he gets to heaven, To Saint Peter he will tell; One more Soldier reporting, sir. I've served my ti ... Read »


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    • Sonnerie aux morts

    • "La Sonnerie aux Morts" is a bugle call of the French Armed Forces used at funerals and the commemoration of battles and wars. Struck by the impact that the Last Post, of the UK and the Commonwealth of Nations, and Taps, of the United States, had on ceremonies and their participants, General Gouraud took the initiativ ... Read »


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    • Staff ride

    • The term staff ride describes three different types of exercise, each of which is conducted on a particular piece of ground: The classic staff ride (a direct translation of the German term Stabs-Reise) is a technique made famous by Helmuth von Moltke the Elder in the second half of the nineteenth century. While se ... Read »


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    • Stick Orderly

    • A Stick Orderly is a junior-ranking soldier assigned to accomplish minor tasks for the highest-ranking officer stationed at the location. They are generally assigned to conveying messages, carrying out summons, clearing files, and maintaining the general tidyness of the officer's desk. They may also be expected to perf ... Read »


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    • Sunset (bugle call)

    • Sunset (bugle call)

      Sunset, also known as the Retreat Call, is a bugle call played in United Kingdom and British Commonwealth countries to signal the end of the official military day. It uses a slightly different melody to the US Retreat bugle call. In common with all bugle calls, it consists only of notes from a single overtone series. T ... Read »


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    • Taps

    • "Taps" is a bugle call played at dusk, during flag ceremonies, and at military funerals by the United States armed forces. The official military version is played by a single bugle or trumpet, although other versions of the tune may be played in other contexts (e.g., the U.S. Marine Corps Ceremonial Music site has reco ... Read »


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    • Three-volley salute

    • The three-volley salute is a ceremonial act performed at military funerals and sometimes also police funerals. The custom originates from the European dynastic wars, where the fighting ceased so the dead and wounded could be removed. Then, three shots were fired into the air to signal that the battle could resume. It ... Read »


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    • To Our Beloved Dead

    • "To Our Beloved Dead" is a poem by the Australian poet Professor Leslie Holdsworth Allen. A sandstone war memorial was designed by architect William Hardy Wilson for Newington College and was dedicated on 11 May 1922 by the Governor-General of Australia, Henry Forster, 1st Baron Forster. Allen wrote the poem in memory ... Read »


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    • United States Air Force Basic Military Training

    • United States Air Force Basic Military Training (also known as BMT or boot camp) is an eight-and-a-half-week program of physical and mental training required in order for an individual to become an Airman in the United States Air Force, United States Air Force Reserve, or Air National Guard. It is carried out at Lackla ... Read »


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    • United States Army Basic Training

    • United States Army Basic Combat Training or BCT (also known as Initial Entry Training or IET) is the program of physical and mental training required in order for an individual to become a soldier in the United States Army, United States Army Reserve, or Army National Guard. It is carried out at several different Army ... Read »


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    • Veterans benefits for post-traumatic stress disorder in the United States


    • Vine staff

    • The vine staff, vine-staff, or centurion's staff (Latin: vitis) was a vinewood rod of about 3 feet (1 m) in length used in the ancient Roman Army and Navy. It was the mark and tool of the centurion: both as an implement in the direction of drill and maneuvers; and to beat wayward or laggard soldiers or sailors under ... Read »


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    • Wingman Project

    • The Wingman Project (formerly 'Wingman For Life') is a layperson, peer-to-peer suicide intervention program that shows U.S. military members and their families how to intervene to save a life. By promoting a Wingman Ethos, whereby military families and members take personal accountability for the well being of each oth ... Read »


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  • What Else?

    • Military life

Extras