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    Law

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    • Law by issue

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    • Law by region

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    • Law by time

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    • Law by type

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    • Law lists

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    • Legal awards

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    • Legal communication

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    • Legal disputes

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    • Legal education

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    • Legal events

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    • Legal history

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    • Insolvency law

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    • Judicial cooperation

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    • Jurisprudence

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    • Law museums

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    • Legal organizations

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    • Legal categories of people

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    • Philosophy of law

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    • Politics

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    • Practice of law

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    • Religion and law

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    • Legal research

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    • Rights

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    • Science and law

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    • Sociology of law

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    • Veto

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    • Works about law

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    • Law stubs

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    • Law

    • Law is a system of rules that are enforced through social institutions to govern behavior. Laws can be made by a collective legislature or by a single legislator, resulting in statutes, by the executive through decrees and regulations, or by judges through binding precedent, normally in common law jurisdictions. Privat ... Read »


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    • Index of law articles

    • This collection of lists of law topics collects the names of topics related to law. Everything related to law, even quite remotely, should be included on the alphabetical list, and on the appropriate topic lists. All links on topical lists should also appear in the main alphabetical listing. The process of creating lis ... Read »


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    • Outline of law

    • The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to law: Law – is the set of rules and principles (laws) by which a society is governed, through enforcement by governmental authorities. Law is also the field which concerns the creation and administration of laws, and includes any and all lega ... Read »


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    • Legal anthropology

    • Legal anthropology, also known as the anthropology of laws, is a sub-discipline of anthropology which specializes in "the cross-cultural study of social ordering". The questions that Legal Anthropologists seek to answer concern how is law present in cultures? How does it manifest? How may anthropologists contribute to ... Read »


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    • Legal archaeology

    • Legal archaeology is an area of legal scholarship "involving detailed historical reconstruction and analysis of important cases." While most legal scholars confine their research to published opinions of court cases, legal archaeologists examine the historical and social context in which a court case was decided. The ... Read »


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    • Access to Justice Initiatives

    • Access to Justice Initiatives (AJI) are a cluster of projects carried out by the Sarhad Rural Support Programme (SRSP) in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, which aim at enhancing legal awareness and empowering citizens at the grass-roots level by enabling them to lobby for their rights and seek remedies for their legal pro ... Read »


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    • Actio

    • Actio is a term in rhetoric that means the delivery that is given to a speech. Hand gestures, voice variation, speaker to audience eye contact, and an engaging manner are all needed for an effective actio. ... Read »


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    • Administration of justice

    • The administration of justice is the process by which the legal system of a government is executed. The presumed goal of such administration is to provide justice for all those accessing the legal system. The phrase is also used commonly to describe a University degree (as in: a BA in Administration of Justice), which ... Read »


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    • Adoption law

    • Adoption law is the generic area of legal theory, policy making, legal practice and legal studies relating to law on adoption. National, or domestic, adoption laws deal with issues such as step-parent adoption, adoption by cohabitees, adoption by single parents and LGBT adoption. Adoption laws in some countries ma ... Read »


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    • Adverse abandonment

    • A petition for adverse abandonment is filed by a party other than the owner of a railroad asking a court or a state board to declare the land abandoned by the railroad. Most railroad rights of way are held in easement, so that the land must revert to the original owners if the tracks are removed. ... Read »


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    • Ambiguity (law)

    • In contract law, ambiguity is a term used to describe situations in which the terms of a contract have multiple definitions or refer to multiple subjects. Patent ambiguity is that ambiguity which is apparent on the face of an instrument to any one perusing it, even if he be unacquainted with the circumstances of t ... Read »


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    • Amministrazione delle Finanze dello Stato v Simmenthal SpA

    • Amministrazione delle Finanze v Simmenthal SpA (1978) Case 106/77 is an EU law case, concerning the conflict of law between a national legal system and European Union law. Simmenthal SpA imported beef from France into Italy. Italy imposed a public health inspection fee for the meat crossing the frontier under an I ... Read »


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    • Animo

    • Animo is a Latin term used in the law that means with intention or with purpose. ... Read »


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    • Association of Judicial Unity

    • Association of Judicial Unity (YBD) [jbd̪] is the largest association of judges and public prosecutors in Turkey. YBD’s origins date back to the Platform of the Judicial Unity created in 2014 by judges and prosecutors from all political horizons, philosophical convictions and religious beliefs. Ensuring the sam ... Read »


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    • Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment

    • Black Silent Majority

      Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment is a non-fiction book written by Michael Javen Fortner. A look into the role of how America's drug policies impact African Americans and crime in their own neighborhoods. The New York Times said in a review of the book, "The history of bl ... Read »


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    • Bridge law

    • Bridge law is the body of laws which apply to bridges in a particular jurisdiction. In the United States, legislative authority to erect a bridge is necessary in three cases: first, when toll is demanded for its use—the right to take toll being a franchise which cannot be claimed without express grant from th ... Read »


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    • Bullying in the legal profession

    • Bullying in the legal profession is believed to be more common than in some other professions. It is believed that its adversarial, hierarchical tradition contributes towards this. Women, trainees and solicitors who have been qualified for five years or less are more impacted, as are ethnic minority lawyers and lesbian ... Read »


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    • Canon (canon law)

    • For the legal system of canons, see Canon law and Canon law (Catholic Church). In Catholic canon law, a canon is a certain rule or norm of conduct or belief prescribed by the Catholic Church. The word "canon" comes from the Greek kanon, which in its original usage denoted a straight rod that was later the instrument u ... Read »


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    • Capital punishment

    • Capital punishment, also known as the death penalty, is a government sanctioned practice whereby a person is put to death by the state as a punishment for a crime. The sentence that someone be punished in such a manner is referred to as a death sentence, whereas the act of carrying out the sentence is known as an execu ... Read »


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    • Child pirate

    • In keeping with the Paris Principles definition of a child soldier, the Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative defines a child pirate' as any person below 18 years of age who is or who has been recruited or used by a pirate gang in any capacity, including children - boys and/or girls - used as gunmen in boarding p ... Read »


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    • Committee

    • A committee (or "commission") is a body of one or more persons that is subordinate to a deliberative assembly. Usually, the assembly sends matters into a committee as a way to explore them more fully than would be possible if the assembly itself were considering them. Committees may have different functions and the typ ... Read »


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    • Community sentence

    • Community sentence or alternative sentencing or non-custodial sentence is a collective name in criminal justice for all the different ways, in which courts can punish someone, convicted of committing an offence, other than the custodial sentence (serving a prison term) or capital punishment (death). Traditionally, the ... Read »


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    • Comparative law

    • Comparative law is the study of differences and similarities between the law of different countries. More specifically, it involves study of the different legal "systems" (or "families") in existence in the world, including the common law, the civil law, socialist law, Canon law, Jewish Law, Islamic law, Hindu law, and ... Read »


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    • Conservation Property Right

    • The ´conservation property right´ is a new institution of private law established in Chile by Law 20.930 enacted on June 10, 2016. In its article 2, this law establishes: ´The conservation property right is a real property interest that consists on the faculty to conserve the environment on a specified land o ... Read »


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    • Constitutional law

    • Constitutional law is the body of law which defines the relationship of different entities within a state, namely, the executive, the legislature, and the judiciary. Not all nation states have codified constitutions, though all such states have a jus commune, or law of the land, that may consist of a variety of impera ... Read »


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    • Constructive

    • Although the general English usage of the adjective constructive is "helping to develop or improve something; helpful to someone, instead of upsetting and negative," as in the phrase "constructive criticism," in legal writing constructive has a different meaning. In its usage in law, constructive means what the law co ... Read »


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    • Course of dealing

    • The term course of dealing is defined in the Uniform Commercial Code as follows: A "course of dealing" is a sequence of conduct concerning previous transactions between the parties to a particular transaction that is fairly to be regarded as establishing a common basis of understanding for interpreting their expressio ... Read »


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    • Course of performance

    • The term course of performance is defined in the Uniform Commercial Code as follows: (a) A "course of performance" is a sequence of conduct between the parties to a particular transaction that exists if: UCC § 1-303(a). "Course of dealing," as defined in [UCC § 1-303] subsection (b), is restricted, literally ... Read »


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    • Criminal responsibility in French law

    • Criminal responsibility is the obligation in French law to answer for infractions committed and to suffer the punishment provided by the legislation that governs the infraction in question. In a democracy citizens have rights but also duties: with freedom comes responsibility. Unlike civil liability, the obligation t ... Read »


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    • Customary law

    • Custom in law is the established pattern of behavior that can be objectively verified within a particular social setting. A claim can be carried out in defense of "what has always been done and accepted by law." Related is the idea of prescription; a right enjoyed through long custom rather than positive law. Customar ... Read »


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    • Duty of Prudence

    • In Trust Law, the Duty of Prudence traditionally includes the duty of a trustee to administer a trust with a degree of care, skill and caution. The degree of care required depends both on the jurisdiction on the trustee's actual or purported skill, for example if they have an accounting background (or claimed to have o ... Read »


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    • Enterprise legal management

    • Enterprise legal management (ELM) is a practice management strategy of corporate legal departments, insurance claims departments, and government legal and contract management departments. ELM developed during the 1990s in response to increased corporate demands for accountability, transparency, and predictability, and ... Read »


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    • European Pharmacopoeia

    • The European Pharmacopoeia (Pharmacopoeia Europaea, Ph. Eur.) is a major regional pharmacopoeia which provides common quality standards throughout the pharmaceutical industry in Europe to control the quality of medicines, and the substances used to manufacture them. It is a published collection of monographs which desc ... Read »


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    • Female empowerment in Nigeria

    • Female empowerment in Nigeria is an economic process that involves empowering Nigerian women as a poverty reduction measure. Empowerment is the development of women in term of politics, social and economic strength in nation development. It is also a way of reducing women vulnerability and dependency in all sphere of l ... Read »


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    • Framework law

    • Framework laws are laws that are more specific than constitutional provisions. They lay down general obligations and principles but leave to governing authorities the task of enacting the further legislation and other specific measures, as may be required. ... Read »


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    • Freemen on the land

    • "Freemen-on-the-land" are a loose group of individuals who believe in a conspiracy theory that they are bound by statute laws only if they consent to those laws. They believe that they can therefore declare themselves independent of the government and the rule of law, holding that the only "true" law is their own inter ... Read »


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    • Gender empowerment

    • Gender empowerment is the empowerment of people of any gender. While conventionally being reduced to its aspect of empowerment of women, the concept stresses the distinction between biological sex and gender as a role, also referring to other marginalized genders in a particular political or social context. Gender emp ... Read »


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    • GikII

    • GikII is a series of European workshops on the intersections between law, technology and popular culture. It is hosted at a different institution every year. The first conference was in 2006 and was held in Edinburgh, and was organised by Lilian Edwards and Andres Guadamuz. The conference has been held in several Euro ... Read »


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    • Harvard Negotiation Project

    • The Harvard Negotiation Project is a project created at Harvard University which deals with issues of negotiations and conflict resolution. The stated aims and goal of the project, according to the Harvard University Law School site is as follows: The mission of the Harvard Negotiation Project (HNP) to improve the th ... Read »


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    • Human rights

    • Human rights

      Human rights are moral principles or norms, which describe certain standards of human behaviour, and are regularly protected as legal rights in municipal and international law. They are commonly understood as inalienable fundamental rights "to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human be ... Read »


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    • Impact litigation

    • Impact litigation or strategic litigation is the practice of bringing lawsuits intended to effect societal change. Impact litigation cases may be class action lawsuits or individual claims with broader significance, and may rely on statutory law arguments or on constitutional claims. Such litigation has been widely and ... Read »


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    • Institute for International Law of Peace and Armed Conflict

    • The Institute for International Law of Peace and Armed Conflict (IFHV) at Ruhr University Bochum (Germany) is one of the leading research institutes on humanitarian law and humanitarian studies in Europe. It was founded in 1988 on the initiative of Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Knut Ipsen, then rector of Ruhr University Bo ... Read »


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    • International Council of Jurists

    • The International Council of Jurists is a professional body of jurists consisting of Senior legal practitioners across the globe with intent to promote legal professionalism. The council also provide legal aid to the less privilege entities. ... Read »


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    • International law

    • International law is the set of rules generally regarded and accepted as binding in relations between states and between nations. It serves as a framework for the practice of stable and organized international relations. International law differs from state-based legal systems in that it is primarily applicable to coun ... Read »


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    • Judicial system in the United Arab Emirates

    • The legal system of the United Arab Emirates is based on the Constitution of the United Arab Emirates; this system is dual in nature as it has local and federal courts with a Supreme Court Based at Abu Dhabi. Unlike Britain and other countries where previous court judgments are regularly used as legal precedents, the ... Read »


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    • Jurimetrics

    • Jurimetrics is the application of quantitative methods, and often especially statistics, to law. The subject has gained considerable currency in both the United States and Brazil. In the United States, the journal Jurimetrics is published by the American Bar Association and Arizona State University. In Brazil, the fie ... Read »


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    • Lawlessness

    • Lawlessness is a lack of law, in any of the various senses of that word. Lawlessness may describe various conditions. Anomie is a breakdown of social bonds between an individual and their community, in which individuals do not feel bound by the moral strictures of society. The term was popularized by French sociologis ... Read »


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    • Lawmaking

    • Lawmaking is the process of crafting legislation. In its purest sense, it is the basis of governance. Lawmaking in modern democracies is the work of legislatures, which exist at the local, regional, and national levels and make such laws as are appropriate to their level, and binding over those under their jurisdictio ... Read »


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    • Legal auditing

    • According to the National Association of Legal Fee Analysis (NALFA), legal auditing is a litigation management practice and risk management tool, used by insurance and other consumers of legal services, to determine if hourly billing errors, abuses, and inefficiencies exist by carefully examining and identifying unrea ... Read »


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    • Legal biography

    • Legal biography is the biography of persons relevant to law. In a preface dated October 1983, A. W. B. Simpson wrote that it was "a rather neglected field". Since then there as been a "resurgence of interest". ... Read »


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    • Legal case

    • A legal case is a dispute between opposing parties resolved by a court, or by some equivalent legal process. A legal case may be either civil or criminal. In each legal case there is an accuser and one or more defendants. A civil case, more commonly known as a lawsuit or controversy, begins when a plaintiff files ... Read »


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    • Legal consciousness

    • Legal consciousness is a 'collection' of understood and/or imagined to have understood, legal awareness of ideas, views, feelings and traditions imbibed through legal socialization; which reflects as legal culture among given individual, or a group, or a given society at large. The legal consciousness evaluates the exi ... Read »


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    • Legal cost finance

    • Legal cost finance (or legal cost credit) is an alternative funding solution to traditional legal financing (or litigation funding in United Kingdom). Unlike litigation funding, which is limited to contentious legal cases and claims a stake in the proceeds of a case outcome, legal cost finance is a funding alternative ... Read »


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    • Legal debate

    • A legal debate is a discussion between lawyers, legal academics, jurists, politicians, and others who might have an interest or expertise in the law, about a particular legal issue. Legal debates can take many forms, and do not necessarily need to be face-to-face debates. Most legal debates take place on paper†... Read »


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    • Legal mobilisation

    • Legal mobilisation is a tool available to paralegal and advocacy groups, to achieve legal empowerment by supporting a marginalized issues of a stakeholder, in negotiating with the other concerned agencies and other stakeholders, by strategic combined use of legal processes along with advocacy, media engagement and soci ... Read »


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    • Legal opportunity structure

    • Legal opportunity structure or legal opportunity is a concept found in the study of law and social movements. It was first used in order to distinguish it from political opportunity structure or political opportunity, on the basis that law and the courts deserved to be studied in their own right rather than being lumpe ... Read »


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    • Legal profession

    • Legal profession is a profession, and legal professionals study, develop and apply law. Usually, there is a requirement for someone choosing a career in law to first obtain a law degree or some other form of legal education. It is difficult to generalize about the structure of the profession, because While in civil l ... Read »


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    • Legal recognition

    • Legal recognition of some status or fact in a jurisdiction is formal acknowledgement of it as being true, valid, legal, or worthy of consideration and may involve approval or the granting of rights. For example, a nation or territory may require a person to hold a professional qualification to practice some occupation ... Read »


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    • Legal tests

    • Legal tests are various kinds of commonly applied methods of evaluation used to resolve matters of jurisprudence. In the context of a trial, a hearing, discovery, or other kinds of legal proceedings, the resolution of certain questions of fact or law may hinge on the application of one or more legal tests. Legal tests ... Read »


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    • Legalism (theology)

    • Legalism (or nomism), in Christian theology, is the act of putting law above gospel by establishing requirements for salvation beyond repentance and faith in Jesus Christ and reducing the broad, inclusive, and general precepts of the Bible to narrow and rigid moral codes. It is an over-emphasis of discipline of conduct ... Read »


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    • Legalism (Western philosophy)

    • Legalism, in the Western sense, is an approach to the analysis of legal questions characterized by abstract logical reasoning focusing on the applicable legal text, such as a constitution, legislation, or case law, rather than on the social, economic, or political context. Legalism has occurred both in civil and common ... Read »


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    • Legislation

    • Legislation (or "statutory law") is law which has been promulgated (or "enacted") by a legislature or other governing body or the process of making it. Before an item of legislation becomes law it may be known as a bill, and may be broadly referred to as "legislation", while it remains under consideration to distinguis ... Read »


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    • List of vaping bans in the United States

    • The following is a list of vaping bans in the United States. For federal regulation concerning the legal status of the sale of electronic cigarettes products in and outside the United States, see the worldwide regulation of electronic cigarettes. Effective August 8, 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ... Read »


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    • M/S R.M.D.C (Mysore) v. State of Mysore


    • Mercy

    • Mercy (Middle English, from Anglo-French merci, from Medieval Latin merced-, merces, from Latin, "price paid, wages", from merc-, merxi "merchandise") is a broad term that refers to , forgiveness and kindness in a variety of ethical, religious, social and legal contexts. The concept of a "Merciful God" appears in vari ... Read »


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    • Network Investigative Technique

    • Network Investigative Technique, or NIT, is a form of malware (or hacking) employed by the FBI since at least 2002. It is a drive-by download computer program designed to provide access to a computer. Its usage has raised both Fourth Amendment concerns and jurisdictional issues. The FBI has to date, despite a cour ... Read »


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    • Oral law

    • An oral law is a code of conduct in use in a given culture, religion or community application, by which a body of rules of human behaviour is transmitted by oral tradition and effectively respected, or the single rule that is orally transmitted. Many cultures have an oral law, while most contemporary legal systems hav ... Read »


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    • Ordinary law

    • An ordinary law is a normal law, generally distinguished from a constitutional law, organic law, or other similar law. Typically, ordinary laws are subordinate to constitutional and organic laws, and are more easily changed than constitutional or organic laws, though that should not be assumed to be the case in all jur ... Read »


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    • Ostrich instruction

    • The ostrich instruction is a jury instruction that the requirement of knowledge to establish a guilty mind (mens rea), is satisfied by deliberate ignorance - deliberate avoidance of knowledge. It arose from the case of United States v. Jewell. ... Read »


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    • Pain management

    • Pain management, pain medicine, pain control or algiatry, is a branch of medicine employing an interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those living with chronic pain The typical pain management team includes medical practitioners, pharmacists, clinical psychologists, phy ... Read »


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    • Preamble

    • A preamble is an introductory and expressionary statement in a document that explains the document's purpose and underlying philosophy. When applied to the opening paragraphs of a statute, it may recite historical facts pertinent to the subject of the statute. It is distinct from the long title or enacting formula of a ... Read »


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    • Privacy

    • Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to seclude themselves, or information about themselves, and thereby express themselves selectively. The boundaries and content of what is considered private differ among cultures and individuals, but share common themes. When something is private to a person, it usually ... Read »


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    • Proactive law

    • Proactive law seeks a new approach to legal issues in businesses and societies. Instead of perceiving law as a constraint that companies and people in general need to comply with, proactive law considers law as an instrument that can create success and foster sustainable relationships, which in the end carries the pote ... Read »


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    • Promise

    • A promise is a commitment by someone to do or not do something. As a noun promise means a declaration assuring that one will or will not do something. As a verb it means to commit oneself by a promise to do or give. It can also mean a capacity for good, similar to a value that is to be realized in the near future. In ... Read »


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    • Public interest

    • Public interest, according to the Random House Dictionary, is "1. the welfare or well-being of the general public; commonwealth. 2. appeal or relevance to the general populace: a news story of public interest." Economist Lok Sang Ho in his Public Policy and the Public Interest (Routledge, 2012, published 2011) argues ... Read »


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    • Public interest law

    • Public interest law loosely, refers to legal practices undertaken to help poor or marginalized people, or to effect change in social policies in the public interest, on 'not for profit' terms (pro bono publico). In general terms it means a legal action initiated in the court of law for the protection of Public Interest ... Read »


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    • Reasonability

    • Reasonability is a legal term. The scale of reasonability represents a quintessential element of modern judicial systems and is particularly important in the context of international disputes and conflicts of laws issues. The concept is founded on the notion that all parties should be held to a reasonable standard of c ... Read »


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    • Regulation of electronic cigarettes

    • Regulation of electronic cigarettes varies across countries and states, ranging from no regulation to banning them entirely. Others have introduced strict restrictions and some have regulated them as medicines such as in the UK. As of 2015[update], around two thirds of major nations have regulated e-cigarettes in some ... Read »


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    • Right to disconnect

    • The right to disconnect is a proposed human right regarding the ability of people to not respond to work e-mail or messages during non-work hours. The government of France passed the El Khomri law to reform working conditions for French people. The law included a chapter titled "The Adaptation of Work Rights to the Di ... Read »


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    • Right to repeat performance

    • The right to repeat performance is a consumer right of remedy created under section 55 of the UK Consumer Rights Act 2015, which provides for a new right for a consumer to require a trader to perform a service again, if the trader is in breach of the agreed services contract or its implied terms, or to perform again su ... Read »


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    • Rights

    • Rights are legal, social, or ethical principles of freedom or entitlement; that is, rights are the fundamental normative rules about what is allowed of people or owed to people, according to some legal system, social convention, or ethical theory. Rights are of essential importance in such disciplines as law and ethics ... Read »


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    • Robot Lawyer

    • A robot lawyer is an artificial intelligence lawyer. It is a computer based machine. A robot lawyer named ROSS has been employed by a law firm in the US, which will use the robot to assist its various teams in legal research. A Robot Lawyer is an Artificial Intelligence(AI) computer program designed to ask the same qu ... Read »


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    • Rollback (legislation)

    • For related uses, see In government and economic contexts, Rollback metaphorically denotes action to repeal, dismantle or otherwise diminish the effect of a law or regulation. The term was utilised by the MAI Negotiating Group in the 1990s in the context of seeking to enforce legislative progress toward "free trade" ... Read »


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    • Rule according to higher law

    • The rule according to a higher law means that no law may be enforced by the government unless it conforms with certain universal principles (written or unwritten) of fairness, morality, and justice. Thus, the rule according to a higher law may serve as a practical legal criterion to qualify the instances of political o ... Read »


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    • Secret law

    • Secret law refers to legal authorities that require compliance that are classified or otherwise withheld from the public. Such non-promulgated laws were common in the Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc countries. The term has been used in reference to some counterterrorist measures taken by the Bush Administration in the Un ... Read »


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    • Seriousness

    • Seriousness (noun; adjective: serious) is an attitude of gravity, solemnity, persistence, and toward something considered to be of importance. Some notable philosophers and commentators have criticised excessive seriousness, while others have praised it. Seriousness is often contrasted with comedy, as in the seriocome ... Read »


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    • John Simmons (attorney)

    • John Simmons is an American attorney and chairman of Simmons Hanly Conroy, the largest mass tort law firm in the United States. Simmons and his firm are known for recovering the most—$5 billion—in jury verdicts and settlements for clients, particularly in asbestos and mesothelioma lawsuits. John Simmons ... Read »


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    • Speedy trial

    • Speedy trial is a human right under which it is asserted that a government prosecutor may not delay the trial of a criminal suspect arbitrarily and indefinitely. Otherwise, the power to impose such delays would allow prosecutors to effectively send anyone to jail for an arbitrary length of time. In jurisdictions with s ... Read »


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    • Stakeholder (law)

    • The term "stakeholder", as traditionally used in the English language in law and notably gambling, is a third party who temporarily holds money or property while its owner is still being determined. The role of stakeholder is a concept in law. A stakeholder was originally a person who temporarily holds money or other ... Read »


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    • Stubborn Children Law

    • The General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony enacted a law in November 1646 providing, among other things, for the capital punishment of male children that were disobedient to their parents. Although death as a penalty was later removed and punishment for disobedient daughters was added, the law was not repealed until ... Read »


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    • Substantive rights

    • Substantive rights are basic human rights possessed by people in an ordered society and includes rights granted by natural law as well as the substantive law. Substantive rights involve a right to the substance of being human (life, liberty, happiness), rather than a right to a procedure to enforce that right, which is ... Read »


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    • Terms (law)

    • In a legal terminology, Terms can have different meanings, depending on the specific context. In Trust Law, Terms generally refers to the Terms of the Trust, meaning the explicit written intention of the Grantor of a Trust. Terms are limited to provisions expressed in a way that makes them like proof in court. Terms o ... Read »


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    • Trade Disputes Act 1965

    • The Trade Disputes Act 1965 is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom on industrial relations. The principal effect was to reverse the legal position established by Rookes v Barnard in 1964. In that case, a worker who had left the workplace trade union had been sacked after the union had threatened to go on strike ... Read »


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    • Trigger law

    • A Trigger Law is a nickname for a law that is unenforceable and irrelevant in the present, but may achieve relevance and enforceability if a key change in circumstances occurs. Although it has never been achieved, many nations have trigger laws banning human cloning, on the assumption that the technology will one day ... Read »


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    • Universal law

    • In law and ethics, universal law or universal principle refers as concepts of legal legitimacy actions, whereby those principles and rules for governing human beings' conduct which are most universal in their acceptability, their applicability, translation, and philosophical basis, are therefore considered to be most l ... Read »


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    • Unofficial law

    • Custom in law is the established pattern of behavior that can be objectively verified within a particular social setting. A claim can be carried out in defense of "what has always been done and accepted by law." Related is the idea of prescription; a right enjoyed through long custom rather than positive law. Customar ... Read »


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    • Thomas de Veil

    • Thomas de Veil

      Sir Thomas de Veil (21 November 1684 – 7 October 1746), also known as deVeil, was Bow Street's first magistrate; he was known for having enforced the Gin Act in 1736, and, with Sir John Gonson, Henry Fielding, and John Fielding, was responsible for creating the first professional police and justice system in Engla ... Read »


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    • Violation of law

    • A violation of law is any act (or, less commonly, failure to act) that fails to abide by existing law. Violations generally may include both crimes and civil wrongs. Some acts, such as fraud, can violate both civil and criminal laws. Examples of violations of law include: ... Read »


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    • Women in law

    • Women in law describes the role played by women in the legal profession and related occupations, which includes lawyers (also called barristers, attorneys or legal counselors), prosecutors (also called District Attorneys or Crown Prosecutors), judges, legal scholars (including feminist legal theorists), law professors ... Read »


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    • Women's empowerment


    • Wrongdoing

    • A wrong (from Old English wrang – crooked) is an act that is illegal or immoral.Legal wrongs are usually quite clearly defined in law of each state or jurisdiction. They can be divided into civil wrongs and crimes (or criminal offences) in common law countries, while civil law countries tend to have some additiona ... Read »


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    • Yolanda Falcón Lizaraso


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  • What Else?

    • Law

Extras