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  • Knowledge

    Knowledge

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    • Academia

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    • Access to Knowledge movement

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    • Bodies of knowledge

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    • Consulting

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    • Knowledge deities

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    • Knowledge engineering

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    • Epistemology

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    • Error

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    • Inductive reasoning

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    • Information

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    • Information, knowledge, and uncertainty

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    • Inquiry

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    • Knowledge sharing

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    • Knowledge transfer

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    • Knowledge-oriented systems

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    • Literacy

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    • Knowledge management

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    • Mysteries

    • Donald Foley (born 1963) is an American actor. Shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Donald Foley made a decision. “It kind of woke me up a little bit,” he said. Life was too short and too uncertain to waste it doing something he didn’t really want to do, he said. A self-employed computer pr ... Mysteries


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    • Navigation

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    • Procedural knowledge

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    • Prophecy

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    • Reference

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    • Research

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    • Rules of thumb

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    • Scholars

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    • Sociology of knowledge

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    • Sources of knowledge

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    • Traditional knowledge

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    • Transdisciplinarity

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    • Trivia

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    • Knowledge

    • Knowledge is a familiarity, awareness or understanding of someone or something, such as facts, information, descriptions, or skills, which is acquired through experience or education by perceiving, discovering, or learning. Knowledge can refer to a theoretical or practical understanding of a subject. It can be implici ... Read »


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    • Outline of knowledge

    • The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to knowledge: Knowledge – familiarity with someone or something, which can include facts, information, descriptions, and/or skills acquired through experience or education. It can refer to the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject ... Read »


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    • Activity theory

    • Activity theory (AT; Russian: Теория деятельности) is an umbrella term for a line of eclectic social sciences theories and research with its roots in the Soviet psychological activity theory pioneered by Lev Vygotsky, Alexei Leont'ev and Sergei Rubinstein. These sch ... Read »


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    • Agnotology

    • Agnotology (formerly agnatology) is the study of culturally induced ignorance or doubt, particularly the publication of inaccurate or misleading scientific data. Robert N. Proctor, a Stanford University professor specializing in the history of science and technology, and linguist Iain Boal coined the neologism on the b ... Read »


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    • Agricultural Information Management Standards

    • Agricultural Information Management Standards (AIMS)

      Agricultural Information Management Standards, abbreviated to AIMS is a space for accessing and discussing agricultural information management standards, tools and methodologies connecting information workers worldwide to build a global community of practice. Information management standards, tools and good practices c ... Read »


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    • Ambidextrous organization

    • Organizational ambidexterity refers to an organization’s ability to be efficient in its management of today’s business and also adaptable for coping with tomorrow’s changing demand. Just as being ambidextrous means being able to use both the left and right hand equally, organizational ambidexterity requi ... Read »


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    • Autoepistemic logic

    • The autoepistemic logic is a formal logic for the representation and reasoning of knowledge about knowledge. While propositional logic can only express facts, autoepistemic logic can express knowledge and lack of knowledge about facts. The stable model semantics, which is used to give a semantics to logic programming ... Read »


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    • Bildung

    • Bildung (German: [ˈbɪldʊŋ], ) refers to the German tradition of self-cultivation (as related to the German for: creation, image, shape), wherein philosophy and education are linked in a manner that refers to a process of both personal and cultural maturation. This maturation is described as a harmonization ... Read »


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    • Body of knowledge

    • A body of knowledge (BOK or BoK) is the complete set of concepts, terms and activities that make up a professional domain, as defined by the relevant learned society or professional association. It is a type of knowledge representation by any knowledge organization. Several definitions of BOK have been developed, for e ... Read »


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    • Book desert

    • A book desert is a geographic area (country, state, county, city, neighborhood, home) where printed books and other reading material are allegedly hard to obtain, particularly without access to an automobile or other form of transportation. Some researchers have defined book deserts by linking them to poverty and low i ... Read »


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    • Causal theory of knowledge

    • A Causal Theory of Knowing is a philosophical essay written by Alvin Goldman in 1967, published in The Journal of Philosophy. It is based on existing theories of knowledge in the realm of epistemology, the study of philosophy through the scope of knowledge. The essay attempts to explain the sensation of knowledge by co ... Read »


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    • Cognitive closure (philosophy)

    • In philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, cognitive closure is the proposition that human minds are constitutionally incapable of solving certain perennial philosophical problems. Owen Flanagan calls this position anti-constructive naturalism or the new mysterianism and the primary advocate of the hypothesis, Co ... Read »


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    • Cognitive justice

    • The concept of cognitive justice is based on the recognition of the plurality of knowledge and expresses the right of the different forms of knowledge to co-exist. Indian scholar Shiv Visvanathan coined the term cognitive justice in his 1997 book “A Carnival for Science: Essays on science, technology and developm ... Read »


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    • Common knowledge

    • Common knowledge is knowledge that is known by everyone or nearly everyone, usually with reference to the community in which the term is used. Common knowledge need not concern one specific subject, e.g., science or history. Rather, common knowledge can be about a broad range of subjects, such as science, literature, h ... Read »


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    • Common knowledge (logic)

    • Common knowledge is a special kind of knowledge for a group of . There is common knowledge of p in a group of agents G when all the agents in G know p, they all know that they know p, they all know that they all know that they know p, and so on ad infinitum. The concept was first introduced in the philosophical litera ... Read »


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    • Communities of innovation

    • Communities that support innovation have been referred to as Communities of Innovation (CoI),Communities for Innovation,Innovation Communities,Open Innovation Communities,Communities of Creation. Coakes and Smith (2007) define Communities of Innovation (CoI) as a form of Communities of Practice that are dedicated ... Read »


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    • Community of practice

    • A community of practice (CoP) is a group of people who share a craft and/or a profession. The concept was first proposed by cognitive anthropologist Jean Lave and educational theorist Etienne Wenger in their 1991 book Situated Learning (Lave & Wenger 1991). Wenger then significantly expanded on the concept in his 1998 ... Read »


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    • Creative computing

    • Creative computing covers the area of creativity and computing, addressing the issue of knowledge discovery. The International Journal of Creative Computing describes creative computing as follows: Creative computing refers to a meta-technology to coalesce knowledge in computing and other disciplines. IJCrC highl ... Read »


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    • Credential

    • A credential is an attestation of qualification, competence, or authority issued to an individual by a third party with a relevant or de facto authority or assumed competence to do so. Examples of credentials include academic diplomas, academic degrees, certifications, security clearances, identification documents, ba ... Read »


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    • Democratization of knowledge

    • The democratization of knowledge is the acquisition and spread of knowledge amongst the common people, not just privileged elites such as clergy and academics. Libraries—public libraries in particular—and modern digital technology such as the internet—play a key role in the democratization of knowledge, ... Read »


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    • Descriptive knowledge

    • Descriptive knowledge, also declarative knowledge or propositional knowledge, is the type of knowledge that is, by its very nature, expressed in declarative sentences or indicative propositions. This distinguishes descriptive knowledge from what is commonly known as "know-how", or procedural knowledge (the knowledge of ... Read »


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    • Dispersed knowledge

    • Dispersed knowledge in economics is the notion that no single agent has information as to all of the factors which influence prices and production throughout the system. Each agent in a market for assets, goods, or services possesses incomplete knowledge as to most of the factors which affect prices in that market ... Read »


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    • Distributed knowledge

    • In multi-agent system research, distributed knowledge is all the knowledge that a community of agents possesses and might apply in solving a problem. Distributed knowledge is approximately what "a wise man knows" or what someone who has complete knowledge of what each member of the community knows knows. Distributed kn ... Read »


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    • Domain knowledge

    • Domain knowledge is valid knowledge used to refer to an area of human endeavour, an autonomous computer activity, or other specialized discipline. Specialists and experts use and develop their own domain knowledge. If the concept domain knowledge or domain expert is used, we emphasize a specific domain which is an obj ... Read »


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    • Duality (CoPs)

    • In the context of a community of practice, the notion of a duality is used to capture the idea of the tension between two opposing forces which become a driving force for change and creativity. Wenger (Wenger 1998) uses the concept of dualities to examine the forces that create and sustain a Community of Practice. He d ... Read »


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    • Empirical knowledge

    • Empirical evidence, also known as sense experience, is the knowledge or source of knowledge acquired by means of the senses, particularly by observation and experimentation. The term comes from the Greek word for experience, ἐμπειρία (empeiría). After Immanuel Kant, it is common in philosop ... Read »


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    • Encyclopedic knowledge

    • The concept of encyclopedic knowledge was once attributed to exceptionally well-read or knowledgeable persons such as Plato, Aristotle, Hildegard von Bingen, Leonardo da Vinci, Immanuel Kant, or G.W.F. Hegel. Professor Tom Rockmore described Hegel, for example, as a polymath and "a modern Aristotle, perhaps the last pe ... Read »


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    • Episteme

    • "Episteme" is a philosophical term derived from the Ancient Greek word , which can refer to knowledge, science or understanding, and which comes from the verb ἐπίσταμαι, meaning "to know, to understand, or to be acquainted with". Plato contrasts episteme with "doxa": common belief or opinio ... Read »


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    • Experiential knowledge

    • Experiential knowledge is knowledge gained through experience, as opposed to a priori (before experience) knowledge: it can also be contrasted both with propositional (textbook) knowledge, and with practical knowledge. Experiential knowledge is cognate to Michael Polanyi's personal knowledge, as well as to Bertrand Ru ... Read »


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    • Explicit knowledge

    • Explicit knowledge is knowledge that can be readily articulated, codified, accessed and verbalized. It can be easily transmitted to others. Most forms of explicit knowledge can be stored in certain media. The information contained in encyclopedias and textbooks are good examples of explicit knowledge. The most com ... Read »


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    • Faith literate

    • Faith literate describes the ability of an individual to become knowledgeable of other religions and faith other than the one a person believes in. A faith literate individual understands the key effects of each religion/belief system by means of the values, attitudes and influence it causes in individuals, famili ... Read »


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    • Foolishness

    • Foolishness is the lack or failure of wisdom and of making proper careful choices. In this sense, it differs from stupidity, which is the lack of intelligence. An act of foolishness is called folly. Foolish talk is called stultiloquence. Andreas Maercker in 1995 defined Foolishness as rigid, dogmatic and inflexibl ... Read »


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    • Forbidden knowledge

    • Forbidden knowledge, which is different from secret knowledge, is used to describe forbidden books or other information to which access is restricted or deprecated for political or religious reasons. Forbidden knowledge is commonly not secret, rather a society or various institutions will use repressive mechanisms to e ... Read »


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    • Foreknowledge

    • Foreknowledge is the concept of knowledge regarding future events. Types of foreknowledge include: ... Read »


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    • Functional illiteracy

    • Functional illiteracy is reading and writing skills that are inadequate "to manage daily living and employment tasks that require reading skills beyond a basic level". Functional illiteracy is contrasted with illiteracy in the strict sense, meaning the inability to read or write simple sentences in any language. Forei ... Read »


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    • General knowledge

    • General knowledge has been defined in differential psychology as "culturally valued knowledge communicated by a range of non-specialist media" and encompassing a wide subject range. This definition excludes highly specialized learning that can only be obtained with extensive training and information confined to a singl ... Read »


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    • Gettier problem

    • The Gettier problem, in the field of epistemology, is a landmark philosophical problem with our understanding of knowledge. Attributed to American philosopher Edmund Gettier, Gettier-type counterexamples (called "Gettier-cases") challenged the long-held justified true belief (or JTB) account of knowledge. On the JTB ac ... Read »


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    • Growth of knowledge

    • A term coined by Karl Popper in his work The Logic of Scientific Discovery to denote what he regarded as the main problem of methodology and the philosophy of science, i.e. to explain and promote the further growth of scientific knowledge. To this purpose, Popper advocated his theory of falsifiability, testability and ... Read »


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    • Half-life of knowledge

    • The half-life of knowledge or half-life of facts is the amount of time that has to elapse before half of the knowledge or facts in a particular area is superseded or shown to be untrue. These coined terms belong to the field of quantitative analysis of science known as scientometrics. These ideas of half-life applied ... Read »


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    • Ignorance

    • Ignorance is the lack of knowledge. The word ignorant is an adjective describing a person in the state of being unaware and is often (incorrectly) used to describe individuals who deliberately ignore or disregard important information or facts. Ignoramus is commonly used in the US as a term for someone who is willfull ... Read »


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    • Inert knowledge

    • Inert knowledge is information which one can express but not use. The process of understanding by learners does not happen to that extent where the knowledge can be used for effective problem-solving in realistic situations. The phenomenon of inert knowledge was first described in 1929 by Alfred North Whitehead: "[T] ... Read »


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    • Institutional memory

    • Institutional memory is a collective set of facts, concepts, experiences and knowledge held by a group of people. Institutional memory has been defined as "the stored knowledge within the organization." Institutional memory requires the ongoing transmission of these memories between members of this group. Element ... Read »


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    • Interactional expertise

    • Interactional expertise is part of a more complex classification of expertise developed by Harry Collins and Robert Evans (both based at Cardiff University). In this initial formulation interactional expertise was part of a threefold classification of substantive expertise that also included ‘no expertise’ an ... Read »


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    • Interdisciplinarity

    • Interdisciplinarity involves the combining of two or more academic disciplines into one activity (e.g., a research project). It is about creating something new by crossing boundaries, and thinking across them. It is related to an interdiscipline or an interdisciplinary field, which is an organizational unit that crosse ... Read »


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    • Internet science

    • Internet science is an interdisciplinary science, which looks at all aspects of the co-evolution in the Internet networks and society and studies it. It works in the intersection of and in the gaps among a wide range of disciplines that have had to respond to the impact of the Internet on their 'home turf' and/or offer ... Read »


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    • Intertwingularity

    • Intertwingularity is a term coined by Ted Nelson to express the complexity of interrelations in human knowledge. Nelson wrote in Computer Lib/Dream Machines (Nelson 1974, p. DM45): "EVERYTHING IS DEEPLY INTERTWINGLED. In an important sense there are no "subjects" at all; there is only all knowledge, since the cross ... Read »


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    • Jnana

    • Jñāna (Sanskrit; Pali: ñāṇa) or gyan is a term for "knowledge" in Indian philosophy and religion. The idea of jnana centers on a cognitive event which is recognized when experienced. It is knowledge inseparable from the total experience of reality, especially a total or divine reality (Brahman). The ... Read »


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    • Know thyself

    • The Ancient Greek aphorism "know thyself" or "gnothi seauton" (Greek: γνῶθι σεαυτόν, transliterated: gnōthi seauton; also ... σαυτόν … sauton with the ε contracted), is one of the Delphic maxims and was inscribed in the pronaos (forecourt) of the Temple ... Read »


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    • Know-it-all

    • A know-it-all or know-all is a person who constantly presents their input as though they were professionally trained, schooled or have firsthand insight into subjects when it is evident this is not the case. A know-it-all will quickly reject opinions, suggestions, thoughts and commentary from others as incorrect, nonse ... Read »


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    • Knowledge acquisition (philosophy)

    • Knowledge acquisition is the process of absorbing and storing new knowledge in memory. Knowledge acquisition first proposed by Aristotle in his seminal work Organon. Aristotle proposed that the mind at birth is a blank slate, or tabula rasa. As a blank slate it contains no knowledge of the objective, empirical universe ... Read »


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    • Knowledge ark

    • A Knowledge Ark (also known as a doomsday ark or doomsday vault) is a collection of knowledge preserved in such a way that future generations would have access to said knowledge if current means of access were lost. Scenarios where availability to information (such as the Internet) would be lost could be described as ... Read »


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    • Knowledge broker

    • A knowledge broker is an intermediary (an organization or a person), that aims to develop relationships and networks with, among, and between producers and users of knowledge by providing linkages, knowledge sources, and in some cases knowledge itself, (e.g. technical know-how, market insights, research evidence) to or ... Read »


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    • Knowledge divide

    • The knowledge divide is the gap in standards of living between those who can find, create, manage, process, and disseminate information or knowledge, and those who are impaired in this process. According to a 2005 UNESCO World Report, the rise in the 21st century of a global information society has resulted in the emer ... Read »


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    • Knowledge enterprise

    • Knowledge enterprise, also named as knowledge company or knowledge-intensive company, or enterprise. According to D. Jemielniak, origin, and scope of this term is unclear. How this can be understood depends on how much company depends on knowledge, that in such a configuration, should be a critical asset of organizatio ... Read »


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    • Knowledge environment

    • Knowledge environments are social practices, technological and physical arrangements intended to facilitate collaborative knowledge building, decision making, inference or discovery, depending on the epistemological premises and goals. Knowledge environments departing from constructivist epistemology assume that d ... Read »


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    • Knowledge extraction

    • Knowledge extraction is the creation of knowledge from structured (relational databases, XML) and unstructured (text, documents, images) sources. The resulting knowledge needs to be in a machine-readable and machine-interpretable format and must represent knowledge in a manner that facilitates inferencing. Although it ... Read »


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    • Knowledge mobilization

    • The term knowledge mobilization (KMb) refers to moving available knowledge (often from formal research) into active use. More than just "bridging the gap", KMb seeks to make connections between research/expertise and policy/practice in order to improve outcomes in various organizations or sectors. KMb involves knowledg ... Read »


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    • Knowledge neglect

    • Knowledge neglect refers to cases when people fail to retrieve and apply previously stored knowledge appropriately into a current situation (Marsh, Umanath, 2014). Perhaps the most famous example of knowledge neglect is the Moses Illusion, discovered in 1981 by Erickson and Mattson. For the illusion, participants are a ... Read »


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    • Knowledge relevance

    • Considering two companies involved in collaborative R&D or product development, Knowledge Relevance is determined by two attributes: and value of knowledge. The more complementary are the knowledge pools of partnering companies, the more the attraction between them. The greater the value of those knowledge pools, the ... Read »


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    • Knowledge space (philosophy)

    • In philosophy and media studies, a knowledge space is described as an emerging anthropological space in which the knowledge of individuals becomes the primary focus for social structure, values, and beliefs. The concept is put forward and explored by philosopher and media critic Pierre Lévy in his 1997 book Collect ... Read »


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    • Knowledge triangle

    • The knowledge triangle refers to the interaction between research, education and innovation, which are key drivers of a knowledge-based society. In the European Union, it also refers to an attempt to better link together these key concepts, with research and innovation already highlighted by the development of the Lisb ... Read »


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    • Knowledge value

    • The idea that knowledge has value is ancient. In the 1st century AD, Juvenal (55-130) stated “All wish to know but none wish to pay the price". In 1775, Samuel Johnson wrote: “All knowledge is of itself of some value.” In the 19th century, Coleridge (1825) stated that : “The worth and value of k ... Read »


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    • Knowledge worker

    • Knowledge workers are workers whose main capital is knowledge. Examples include software engineers, physicians, pharmacists, architects, engineers, scientists, public accountants, lawyers, and academics, whose job is to "think for a living". Knowledge work can be differentiated from other forms of work by its emph ... Read »


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    • Knowledge-based theory of the firm

    • The knowledge-based theory of the firm considers knowledge as the most strategically significant resource of a . Its proponents argue that because knowledge-based resources are usually difficult to imitate and socially complex, heterogeneous knowledge bases and capabilities among firms are the major determinants of sus ... Read »


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    • Laity

    • A layperson (also layman or laywoman) is a person who is not qualified in a given profession and/or does not have specific knowledge of a certain subject. In religious organizations, the laity consists of all members who are not members of the clergy, usually including any non-ordained members of religious institutes, ... Read »


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    • Literacy

    • Literacy is traditionally understood as the ability to read, write, and use arithmetic. The modern term's meaning has been expanded to include the ability to use language, numbers, images, computers, and other basic means to understand, communicate, gain useful knowledge and use the dominant symbol systems of a culture ... Read »


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    • Sensemaking

    • Sensemaking is the process by which people give meaning to experience. While this process has been studied by other disciplines under other names for centuries, the term "sensemaking" has primarily marked three distinct but related research areas since the 1970s: Sensemaking was introduced to information science by Bre ... Read »


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    • Meta-Functional Expertise

    • Meta-functional expertise is the breadth of one’s strategically important knowledge. This is different from the traditional conceptualization of expertise, which is generally considered to be a great depth of knowledge in a defined area. Thus, experts are people who are distinguished as knowing a lot about a parti ... Read »


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    • Metaknowledge

    • Metaknowledge or meta-knowledge is knowledge about a preselected knowledge. For the reason of different definitions of knowledge in the subject matter literature, meta-information is or is not included in meta-knowledge. Detailed cognitive, systemic and epistemic study of human knowledge requires a distinguishing of t ... Read »


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    • Methods of obtaining knowledge

    • Knowledge may originate or be derived from the following origins or methods: So far processes have been mentioned by which knowledge is obtained. But, in obtaining knowledge there are two main kinds of knowledge that one can obtain. The first is fallible knowledge. Fallible knowledge is characterized by Baron Reed ... Read »


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    • Monopolies of knowledge

    • The Canadian economic historian Harold Innis developed the concept of monopolies of knowledge in his later writings on communications. Innis gave no precise definition of the term, but did suggest that he was extending the concept of monopoly in the field of economics to knowledge in general. Monopolies of knowledge a ... Read »


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    • Multidisciplinarity

    • A multidisciplinary approach involves drawing appropriately from multiple academic disciplines to redefine problems outside normal boundaries and reach solutions based on a new understanding of complex situations. One widely used application of this approach is in health care, where people are often looked after by a m ... Read »


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    • Mutual knowledge (logic)

    • Mutual knowledge is a fundamental concept about information in game theory, (epistemic) logic, and epistemology. An event is mutual knowledge if all agents know that the event occurred. However, mutual knowledge by itself implies nothing about what agents know about other agents' knowledge: i.e. it is possible that an ... Read »


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    • Network of practice

    • Network of practice (often abbreviated as NoP) is a concept originated by John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. This concept, related to the work on communities of practice by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger, refers to the overall set of various types of informal, emergent social networks that facilitate information exchange ... Read »


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    • Noogony

    • Noogony is a general term for any theory of knowledge that attempts to explain the origin of concepts in the human mind by considering sense or a posteriori data as solely relevant. The word was used, famously, by Kant in his Critique of Pure Reason to refer to what he understood to be Locke's account of the origin of ... Read »


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    • Noology

    • Noology or noölogy derives from the ancient Greek words νοῦς, nous or "mind" and λόγος, logos. Noology thus outlines a systematic study and organization of everything dealing with knowing and knowledge. It is also used to describe the science of intellectual phenomena. It is the study of ... Read »


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    • Nous

    • Nous (British: /ˈnaʊs/; US: /ˈnuːs/), sometimes equated to intellect or intelligence, is a philosophical term for the faculty of the human mind which is described in classical philosophy as necessary for understanding what is true or real. The three commonly used philosophical terms are from Greek, or ν ... Read »


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    • Numeracy

    • Numeracy is the ability to reason and to apply simple numerical concepts. Basic numeracy skills consist of comprehending fundamental arithmetics like addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. For example, if one can understand simple mathematical equations such as, 2 + 2 = 4, then one would be considered pos ... Read »


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    • Object pairing

    • Object pairing is the name of a creativity technique created by Idan Gafni in 1999. The technique can be used by individuals or groups to hold an initiated creativity session. The method is an initiated process that harnesses "the way people think and remember" to practical creativity. The method uses association expa ... Read »


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    • Obscurantism

    • Obscurantism (/ɒbˈskjʊərənˌtɪzəm, əb-/ and /ˌɒbskjʊˈræntɪzəm/) is the practice of deliberately preventing the facts of some subject matter from becoming known. There are two, historical and intellectual denotations of Obscurantism: (1) the deliberate restriction of knowle ... Read »


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    • Omniscience

    • Omniscience /ɒmˈnɪʃəns/, mainly in religion, is the capacity to know everything that there is to know. In particular, Dharmic religions (Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism and Sikhism) and the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) believe that there is a divine being who is omniscient. An omnis ... Read »


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    • Open knowledge

    • Open knowledge is knowledge that one is free to use, reuse, and redistribute without legal, social or technological restriction. Open knowledge is a set of principles and methodologies related to the production and distribution of how knowledge works in an open manner. Knowledge is interpreted broadly to include data, ... Read »


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    • Knowledge organization

    • Knowledge organization (KO) (or "organization of knowledge", "organization of information" or "information organization") is a branch of Library and Information Science (LIS) concerned with activities such as document description, indexing and classification performed in libraries, databases, archives, etc. These activ ... Read »


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    • Organizing Knowledge Cognitively

    • People store knowledge in many different ways. The main storage types are: Concepts, Schemes and Scripts, and Personal Theories. A concept is a system of grouping and categorizing our brain uses to sort and store information. Concepts change and adapt as the amount of knowledge about a particular subject changes a ... Read »


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    • Pantomath

    • A pantomath is a person who wants to know and knows everything. The word itself is not to be found in common online English dictionaries, the OED, dictionaries of obscure words, or dictionaries of neologisms. Logic dictates that there are no literal nonfictional pantomaths, but the word pantomath seems to have been us ... Read »


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    • Perspicacity

    • Perspicacity (also called perspicaciousness) is a penetrating discernment—a clarity of vision or intellect which provides a deep understanding and insight. In 17th century Europe René Descartes devised systematic rules for clear thinking in his work Regulæ ad directionem ingenii (Rules for the direction of ... Read »


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    • Draft:PoolParty Semantic Suite

    • The PoolParty Semantic Suite is a technology platform provided by the Semantic Web Company. The EU-based company belongs to the early pioneers of the Semantic Web movement (Reference). The software supports enterprises in knowledge management, data analytics and content organisation. The product uses standards-based te ... Read »


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    • Question Manager

    • Question Manager (also called QM) is a system that allows institutional staff to manage questions from ‘clients’. QM is not intended to be a complex system, and therefore has a workflow that entails clients coming to the institution with a question, and then the question being offered to ‘experts’ t ... Read »


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    • Remember versus know judgements

    • There is evidence suggesting that different processes are involved in remembering something versus knowing whether it is familiar. It appears that "remembering" and "knowing" represent relatively different characteristics of memory as well as reflect different ways of using memory. To remember is the conscious recolle ... Read »


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    • Research

    • Research comprises "creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of humans, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications." It is used to establish or confirm facts, reaffirm the results of previous work, solve n ... Read »


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    • Ridiculous

    • The ridiculous is that which is highly incongruous or inferior, sometimes deliberately so to make people laugh or get their attention, and sometimes unintended so as to be considered laughable and earn or provoke ridicule and derision. It comes from the 1540s Latino "ridiculosus" meaning "laughable", from "ridiculus" m ... Read »


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    • Scientia potentia est

    • The phrase "scientia potentia est" (or "scientia est potentia"[p] or also "scientia potestas est") is a Latin aphorism meaning "knowledge is power". It is commonly attributed to Sir Francis Bacon, although there is no known occurrence of this precise phrase in Bacon's English or Latin writings. However, the expression ... Read »


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    • Self-knowledge (psychology)

    • Self-knowledge is a term used in psychology to describe the information that an individual draws upon when finding an answer to the question "What am I like?". While seeking to develop the answer to this question, self-knowledge requires ongoing self-awareness and self-consciousness (which is not to be confused with c ... Read »


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    • Specialization of knowledge

    • A modern development and belief that the progress of knowledge is the result of distinct and independent spheres, and that knowledge in one discipline has little connection with knowledge in another discipline. Thus, specialists pursue their work in isolation from one another rather than as aspects of a unity or whole. ... Read »


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    • Success trap

    • The success trap refers to business organizations that focus on the exploitation of their (historically successful) current business activities and as such neglect the need to explore new territory and enhance their long-term viability. The success trap arises when a firm overemphasizes exploitation investments, e ... Read »


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    • Tacit knowledge

    • Tacit knowledge (as opposed to formal, codified or explicit knowledge) is the kind of knowledge that is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalizing it. For example, that London is in the United Kingdom is a piece of explicit knowledge that can be written down, transmitted, and und ... Read »


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    • Understanding

    • Understanding is a psychological process related to an abstract or physical object, such as a person, situation, or message whereby one is able to think about it and use concepts to deal adequately with that object. Understanding is a relation between the knower and an object of understanding. Understanding implies abi ... Read »


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    • Wisdom

    • Wisdom or sapience is the ability to think and act using knowledge, experience, understanding, common sense, and insight. Wisdom has been regarded as one of four cardinal virtues; and as a virtue, it is a habit or disposition to perform the action with the highest degree of adequacy under any given circumstance with th ... Read »


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    • Wise fool

    • The wise fool, or the wisdom of the fool is a theme that is an oxymoron in which the fool may have an attribute of wisdom. With probable beginnings early in the civilizing process, the concept developed during the Middle Ages when there was a rise of "civilizing" factors (such as the advent of certain practices of mann ... Read »


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  • What Else?

    • Knowledge

Extras