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    Jurisprudence

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    • Books about jurisprudence

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    • Comparative law

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Comparative law


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    • Islamic jurisprudence

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Islamic jurisprudence


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    • Jurisprudence academics

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    • Jurisprudence of canon law

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Jurisprudence of canon law


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    • Legal history

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    • Medical jurisprudence

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    • Sociology of law

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    • Jurisprudence

    • Jurisprudence is the science, study, and theory of law. It includes principles behind law that make the law. Scholars of jurisprudence, also known as jurists or legal theorists (including legal philosophers and social theorists of law), hope to obtain a deeper understanding of the nature of law, of legal reasoning, leg ... Read »


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    • Analytical jurisprudence

    • Analytical jurisprudence is a legal theory that draws on the resources of modern analytical philosophy to try to understand the nature of law. Since the boundaries of analytical philosophy are somewhat vague, it is difficult to say how far it extends. H. L. A. Hart was probably the most influential writer in the modern ... Read »


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    • Bar Professional Training Course

    • The Bar Professional Training Course or BPTC (previously known as Bar Vocational Course, or BVC) is a postgraduate course which allows law graduates to be named and practise as barristers in England and Wales. The thirteen institutes that run the BPTC along with the four prestigious Inns of Court are often collectively ... Read »


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    • Cautelary jurisprudence

    • Cautelary jurisprudence is law made in a precautionary way prior to or outside of the normal legislative enactment. It meant empirical, practical legal efforts aimed at solving individual cases, as distinguished from regular jurisprudence which sought to establish abstract rules under which individual cases would fall. ... Read »


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    • Comparative law

    • Comparative law is the study of differences and similarities between the law of different countries. More specifically, it involves study of the different legal "systems" (or "families") in existence in the world, including the common law, the civil law, socialist law, Canon law, Jewish Law, Islamic law, Hindu law, and ... Read »


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    • Human Rights and Climate Change

    • Human Rights and Climate Change is a conceptual and legal framework under which international human rights and their relationship to global warming are studied, analyzed, and addressed. The framework has been employed by governments, United Nations organs, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, human rig ... Read »


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    • Judicial interference

    • Judicial interference is the actions of courts or judicial officers in matters that are interpreted by some as beyond their constitutionally established role. ... Read »


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    • Otto Kirchheimer

    • Otto Kirchheimer (German: [ˈkɪɐ̯çˌhaɪmɐ]; 11 November 1905 in Heilbronn – 22 November 1965 in New York City) was a German jurist of Jewish ancestry and political scientist of the Frankfurt School whose work essentially covered the state and its constitution. Kircheimer worked as a research ... Read »


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    • Kompetenz-kompetenz

    • Kompetenz-kompetenz, or competence-competence, is a jurisprudential doctrine whereby a legal body, such as a court or arbitral tribunal, may have competence, or jurisdiction, to rule as to the extent of its own competence on an issue before it. The concept arose in the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany. Since the ... Read »


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    • Law school of Beirut

    • Law school of Beirut

      The law school of Beirut (also known as the law school of Berytus and the school of Roman law at Berytus) was a center for the study of Roman law in classical antiquity located in Beirut (Latin: Berytus). It flourished under the patronage of the Roman emperors and functioned as the Roman Empire's preeminent center of j ... Read »


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    • Law without the state

    • Law without the state (also called transnational stateless law, stateless law, or private legal orderings) is law made primarily outside of the power of a state. Such law may be established in several ways: ... Read »


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    • Legal history

    • Legal history or the history of law is the study of how law has evolved and why it changed. Legal history is closely connected to the development of civilisations and is set in the wider context of social history. Among certain jurists and historians of legal process, it has been seen as the recording of the evolution ... Read »


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    • Owen Hood Phillips

    • Owen Hood Phillips (1907 - 1986) was Barber Professor of Jurisprudence in the University of Birmingham and Dean of the Faculty of Law, Vice-Principal and Pro-Vice-Chancellor of that university. He was the author of the following books: ... Read »


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    • Practice of law

    • Practice of law

      In its most general sense, the practice of law involves giving legal advice to clients, drafting legal documents for clients, and representing clients in legal negotiations and court proceedings such as lawsuits, and is applied to the professional services of a lawyer or attorney at law, barrister, solicitor, or civil ... Read »


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    • Scholia Sinaitica

    • The Scholia Sinaitica are fragments of a work of Roman law written in Greek, dating between 438 and 529 AD, containing comments to the books 35-38 of Ulpian's ad Sabinum treatise. The papyrus fragments that show parts of the work were discovered by the Greek scholar Gregorios Bernardakis in the 19th century in a Mount ... Read »


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    • Silver Gavel Award

    • The Silver Gavel Award (also known as the ABA Silver Gavel Awards for Media and The Arts) is an annual award the American Bar Association gives to honor outstanding work by those who help improve comprehension of jurisprudence in the United States. The award is the American Bar Association's highest form of recogn ... Read »


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    • Sociology of law

    • The sociology of law (or legal sociology) is often described as a sub-discipline of sociology or an interdisciplinary approach within legal studies. Some see sociology of law as belonging "necessarily" to the field of sociology whilst others tend to consider it a field of research caught up between the disciplines of l ... Read »


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    • South African jurisprudence

    • South African jurisprudence refers to the study and theory of South African law. Jurisprudence has been defined as "the study of general theoretical questions about the nature of laws and legal systems." ... Read »


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    • Tadhkirat al-Fuqahā


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