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    • 3rd century in architecture

    • See also: 2nd century in architecture, 4th century in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... Read »


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    • 21st Rule

    • Throughout the period before the American Civil War, petitions and memorials relating to the slavery question appear in many records of the United States Congress. Between 1836 and 1844, the 21st rule of the U.S. House of Representatives (the so-called gag rule) provided that no petition relating to the abolition of sl ... Read »


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    • 564 BC

    • The year 564 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. In the Roman Empire, it was known as year 190 Ab urbe condita. The denomination 564 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. ... Read »


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    • 1848 in Chile

    • Events in the year 1848 in Chile. ... Read »


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    • 1884 in Mexico

    • 1884 in Mexico

      Events in the year 1884 in Mexico. ... Read »


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    • 1921 in radio

    • 1921 in radio details the internationally significant events in radio broadcasting for the year 1921. ... Read »


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    • 1923 in radio

    • 1923 in radio details the internationally significant events in radio broadcasting for the year 1923. ... Read »


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    • 1925 in radio

    • The year 1925 saw a number of significant events in radio broadcasting history. ... Read »


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    • 1926 in radio

    • The year 1926 saw a number of significant happenings in radio broadcasting history. ... Read »


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    • 1934 in radio

    • The year 1934 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1935 in radio

    • The year 1935 saw a number of significant happenings in radio broadcasting history. ... Read »


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    • 1937 in radio

    • The year 1937 saw a number of significant events in radio broadcasting.history. ... Read »


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    • 1951 in Malaya

    • 1951 in Malaya

      1951 in Malaya ... Read »


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    • 1952 in radio

    • The year 1952 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1953 in radio

    • ... 19th century . 20th century .21st century ... The year 1953 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1954 in radio

    • The year 1954 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1955 in radio

    • The year 1955 saw a number of significant events in radio broadcasting history. ... Read »


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    • 1960 in radio

    • The year 1960 in radio involved some significant events. Sometime during the year, KFMA (1580 AM) of Davenport, Iowa switches call letters to KWNT. By now, the format is full-time country music, the only station in the Quad-Cities market to devote exclusively to country music. ... Read »


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    • 1961 in radio

    • The year 1961 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1963 in radio

    • The year 1963 in radio involved some significant events, including the addition of FM-compatible radios in cars made by major American automobile companies, and the birth of future radio personality Doctor Dré ... Read »


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    • 1964 in radio

    • The year 1964 saw a number of significant events in radio broadcasting history. ... Read »


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    • 1965 in radio

    • The year 1965 saw a number of significant events in radio broadcasting. ... Read »


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    • 1966 in radio

    • The year 1966 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1970 in radio

    • The year 1970 in radio saw the debut of a nationally sydicated music countdown show and the incorporation of NPR. ... Read »


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    • 1970 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1971 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1972 world oil market chronology

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    • 1973 in politics

    • See also: 1972 in politics, other events of 1973, 1974 in politics, list of years in politics. ... Read »


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    • 1974 in radio

    • The year 1974 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1976 world oil market chronology

    • Official price of Saudi Light remains at $12.37 per barrel throughout 1976. ... Read »


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    • 1977 in radio

    • In the year 1977, significant events in radio broadcasting included the President of the United States participating in a call-in radio program. ... Read »


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    • 1977 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1978 in radio

    • The year 1978 saw a number of significant events in radio broadcasting. ... Read »


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    • 1978 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1979 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1980 in radio

    • 1980 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1980 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1981 in radio

    • The year 1981 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1981 in Sri Lanka

    • 1981 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1981 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1981 world oil market chronology

    • Saudis flood market with inexpensive oil in 1981, forcing unprecedented price cuts by OPEC members. ... Read »


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    • 1982 in Sri Lanka

    • 1982 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1982 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1982 world oil market chronology

    • Indications of a world oil glut led to a rapid decline in world oil prices early in 1982. OPEC appears to lose control over world oil prices. ... Read »


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    • 1983 in Sri Lanka

    • 1983 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1983 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1983 world oil market chronology

    • Oil glut takes hold. Demand falls as a result of conservation, use of other fuels and recession. OPEC agrees to limit overall output to 17.5 MMB/D. OPEC agrees to individual output quotas and cuts prices by $5 to $29 per barrel. ... Read »


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    • 1984 in radio

    • The year 1984 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1984 in Sri Lanka

    • 1984 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1984 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1984 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1985 in radio

    • The year 1985 in radio involved some significant events. ... Read »


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    • 1985 in Sri Lanka

    • 1985 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1985 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1985 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1986 in radio

    • The year 1986 saw a number of significant events in radio broadcasting. ... Read »


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    • 1986 in Sri Lanka

    • 1986 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1986 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1987 in Sri Lanka

    • 1987 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1987 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1987 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1988 in Sri Lanka

    • 1988 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1988 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1988 world oil market chronology

    • Wide use of crude formula pricing in 1988. ... Read »


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    • 1989 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1990 in Sri Lanka

    • 1990 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1990 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1991 in Sri Lanka

    • 1991 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1991 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1992 in Sri Lanka

    • 1992 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1992 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1992 world oil market chronology

    • ... Read »


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    • 1993 in radio

    • The year 1993 in radio involved some significant events. WPAT and WPAT-FM Paterson, NJ/New York City quietly complete the evolution from Beautiful Music to down-tempo Adult Contemporary, still known as Easy 93. 28: Salty Brine, longtime morning host at WPRO does his last program on that station. Final broadcast ... Read »


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    • 1993 in Sri Lanka

    • 1993 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1993 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1994 in Sri Lanka

    • 1994 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1994 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1995 in Sri Lanka

    • 1995 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1995 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1996 in Sri Lanka

    • 1996 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1996 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1997 in Sri Lanka

    • 1997 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1997 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1998 in Sri Lanka

    • 1998 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1998 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 1999 in Sri Lanka

    • 1999 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 1999 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 2000 in Sri Lanka

    • 2000 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 2000 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 2001 in Sri Lanka

    • 2001 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 2001 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 2003 in Sri Lanka

    • 2003 in Sri Lanka

      The following lists events that happened during 2003 in Sri Lanka. ... Read »


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    • 2006 European blackout

    • The 2006 European blackout was a major blackout which occurred on Saturday, November 4, 2006. More than 15 million clients of the European Network of Transmission System Operators for Electricity did not have access to electricity during about two hours on this date. The immediate action taken by the Transmission Syste ... Read »


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    • 2007 in Ukraine

    • 2007 in Ukraine

      Events in the year 2007 in Ukraine. ... Read »


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    • 2012 in Ukraine

    • 2012 in Ukraine

      Events in the year 2012 in Ukraine. ... Read »


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    • Abdullah Al-Sha'ab


    • Aboiteau

    • Aboiteau farming on reclaimed marshland is a labor-intensive method in which earthen dykes are constructed to stop high tides from inundating marshland. A wooden sluice or aboiteau (plural aboiteaux) is then built into the dyke, with a hinged door (clapper valve) that swings open at low tide to allow fresh water to dra ... Read »


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    • Action Committee of the Cabinda National Union

    • The Action Committee of the Cabinda National Union (Portuguese: Comite d'acção de União Nacional Cabindesa; CAUNC) is a defunct, separatist organization that campaigned for the independence of Cabinda province from Portugal. CAUNC merged with the Movement for the Liberation of the Enclave of Cabinda (MLEC) and ... Read »


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    • Agri (Maeotae)

    • The Agri were an ancient people dwelling along the Palus Maeotis in antiquity. Strabo describes them as living among the Maeotae, Sindi, Dandarii, Toreatae, Arrechi, Tarpetes, Sittaceni, Dosci, and Aspurgiani, among others. Agri is one of the Maeotae tribes, who lived in the 1st millennium BC on the east and the south ... Read »


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    • Ahlen Water Tower

    • The Ahlen water tower is an industrial monument and landmark in the Ahlen, Germany. The spherical water tank is 44 metres (144 ft) high and has a capacity of 1,000 cubic metres (35,000 cu ft). From 1915 to 1917, the water tower served as the sole water supply for the Westphalia mine and the miners colony buil ... Read »


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    • Al-Tagr al-Adna

    • The Lower March (Arabic: الثغر الأدنى‎, al-á¹®aḡr al-ʾAdnā) was a march of the Al Andalus. It included territory that is now in Portugal. ... Read »


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    • Albion (Saxon)

    • Albion (or Abbion shortend to Abbio or Abbi) was a Germanic leader of the Saxons in the times of Charlemagne. (exact dates remain unknown) Together with Widukind he opposed the aggressive east expansion of the Carolingian Empire. 785 after being defeated in the Saxon wars he was baptized together with Widukind, possib ... Read »


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    • Ali Amiri (historian)

    • Ali Amiri (b. 1857 Diyarbakır - d. 1923 Istanbul) was an Ottoman historian. He worked as a finance official and used his assignments to different towns to transcribe Arabic and Turkish inscriptions that he found. He sought out local histories and old documents, both historical and poetic. Through his endeavours he b ... Read »


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    • Alltagsgeschichte


    • American Irish Historical Society

    • The American Irish Historical Society (AIHS) is a historical society devoted to Irish American history, founded in Boston in the late 19th century. In continuous operation since 1897, the Society has been non-partisan and non-sectarian since its inception. The Society was founded as a response to the establishment of t ... Read »


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    • Ancestral home

    • An ancestral home is the place of origin of one's extended family, or the home owned and preserved by the same family for several generations. The place of origin of one's extended family in Chinese culture and society. Ancestral homes in the Philippines kept by generations of the same family. ... Read »


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    • Annales Ceccanenses

    • The Annales Ceccanenses, also called the Chronicon Fossae novae, is a chronicle of world history from the birth of Jesus down to 1218. It was a written in the late twelfth and early thirteenth century by an anonymous monk of Fossanova Abbey, near Ceccano. It is partially dependent on the Annales Cavenses and Annales Ca ... Read »


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    • Appel de Blois

    • Appel de Blois is an initiative by Liberté pour l’Histoire to work against legislative authorities criminalizing the past through the legislative, thus putting more and more obstacles in the way of historical research. The initiative asks people to sign up under this: Concerned about the retrospective moraliz ... Read »


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    • Duke of Arco

    • The Duke of Arco is a Spanish noble title created by King Philip V in 1715 for . As with other Spanish noble titles, the dukedom of Arco descended according to cognatic primogeniture, meaning that females could inherit the title if they had no brothers (or if their brothers had no issue), such as in the 7th Duches ... Read »


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    • Argiletum

    • The Argiletum (Italian: Argileto) was the main route approaching the Forum Romanum from the northeast in the ancient city of Rome. It connected the Forum with the Subura district of the city. As it originally passed between Comitium and Basilica Pauli, the Argiletum was eventually absorbed by the construction of the im ... Read »


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    • Argippaeans

    • The Argippaeans or Argippaei are a people mentioned by Herodotus in his The Histories. He mentions them as north of the Scythians and much of the scholarship points to them being a tribe near the Ural Mountains. As far as their country, the tract of land whereof I have been speaking is all a smooth plain, and the so ... Read »


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    • Aristippus of Argos

    • Aristippus of Argos (/ˌærəˈstɪpəs/; Greek: Ἀρίστιππος) was a tyrant of Argos in the 3rd century BC. His grandfather may have been the Aristippus installed as tyrant by the Macedonian king Antigonus II Gonatas in 272 BC, and his father was the tyrant Aristomachos the Eld ... Read »


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    • Arkina district

    • Arkina district was the part of the medieval Armenian city of Ani where, in 990, Trdat the Architect completed the building of the Mother Cathedral of Ani. ... Read »


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    • Armless wonder

    • An armless wonder was a person without arms who was exhibited, usually at a circus sideshow. Typically (but not exclusively) a woman, she would perform various tricks using her feet and toes, such as smoking a cigarette or writing. Frequently, she would have a supply of visiting cards which, for an extra charge, she wo ... Read »


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    • Aspurgiani

    • The Aspurgiani (Greek: Ἀσπουργιανοί or Ἀσπουγγιτανοί) were an ancient people, a tribe of the Maeotae dwelling along east side of the Strait of Kerch along the Palus Maeotis in antiquity. They seem to be identical with the "Asturicani" of Pto ... Read »


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    • Association for History and Computing

    • The Association for History and Computing (AHC) is an organization dedicated to the use of computers in historical research. The AHC is an international organization with the aim of promoting the use of computers in all types of historical study, both for teaching and research. It was originally proposed at a conferen ... Read »


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    • Asturicani

    • The Asturicani are a tribe mentioned by Ptolemy (v. 9. § 7) as dwelling adjacent to the Pontus Euxinus (Black Sea). William Smith equates them with the Aspurgiani. ... Read »


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    • Aulic titulature


    • Bailleur

    • A bailleur, a French term, is a land owner who outsourced uncultivated parcels of land as part of an early Middle Age sharecropping system known as complant — a precursor to the métayage system. Under this system, a laborer known as a prendeur would agree to cultivate land owned by the bailleur in exchange for ... Read »


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    • Bakran tribe

    • The Bakran tribe or Bagran tribe had connections with the Bagratuni Dynasty of Armenia and later Georgia and the Tirikan tribe with the Armenian King Tigranes the Great. The reconstruction of Lake Van immediately east of the country of the Bakran tribe. This is the area Tigrans family/clan was supposed to have dominate ... Read »


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    • Balik (ruler)

    • Balik (Bulgarian: Балик, Byzantine Greek: Μπαλίκας; fl. c. 1320 and died 1347) was a noble of the Second Bulgarian Empire who increased the autonomy of his province and became despot of the Principality of Karvuna. During the Byzantine civil war of 1341–1347 he supported the ... Read »


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    • Bar massacre

    • The Bar massacre (Albanian: Masakra e Tivarit) was the 1945 killing of 400–2,000 Albanians in Bar by Yugoslav Partisans during World War II. The victims were Albanian recruits from Kosovo, who were supposed to fight the retreating Wehrmacht. Their Yugoslav commanders collected them together, disarmed them and let ... Read »


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    • Baradostian culture

    • ↑ Pliocene (before Homo) The Baradostian culture was an Upper Paleolithic flint industry culture found in the Zagros region in the border-country between Iraq and Iran. It was preceded by the Middle Paleolithic Mousterian culture. Radiocarbon dates suggest that this was one of the earliest Upper Paleolithic comp ... Read »


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    • Bartholomaeus of Neocastro

    • Bartholomaeus of Neocastro (c. 1240 – after 1293) was an Italian jurist, and author of a chronicle called the Historia Sicula, which covers the years from 1250 to 1293. ... Read »


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    • Bathonea

    • Bathonea (Bathoneia, Βαθονεία in Greek) is the name of a long-lost ancient Greek city that was located on the European shore of the sea of Marmara, 20 km west from Istanbul in Turkey. The ruins of this town, which have always remained visible, were studied extensively in 1930 by the Swiss ar ... Read »


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    • Beef ring

    • Beef rings are cooperative groups of six to twenty-four farms, with each member of the cooperative being required to supply one animal over the course of the summer to the cooperative for slaughter (either done locally on the farm or at a slaughterhouse at the member's expense). Beef rings were common among North Amer ... Read »


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    • Beit Professor of Commonwealth History

    • The Beit Professorship of Commonwealth History is one of the senior professorships in history at the University of Oxford. It was established in 1905 as the Beit Professorship of Colonial History. The post is held in conjunction with a fellowship at Balliol College, Oxford. ... Read »


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    • Belemites

    • Belemite was a term used during the Napoleonic Wars by English troops to describe an officer who shirked his duty, preferring to remain safely behind the lines. Belém, outside of Lisbon, was the location of a convent used by the army as a hospital. Charles Oman in his 1912 “Wellington's Army, 1809–1814†... Read »


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    • Bemis Hall (Lincoln, Massachusetts)

    • Bemis Hall is the home of the Bemis Lecture Series and the offices of the Lincoln Council on Aging, and is located in the town of Lincoln, Massachusetts. It was dedicated in May, 1892 as part of the will of George Bemis. In the will, Bemis stipulated that the town build, "...a new Town Hall in which shall be a room of ... Read »


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    • Bhoja II (Paramara dynasty)

    • Bhoja II was a 13th-century king of the Paramara dynasty in central India. He succeeded Arjuna II as the king of Dhara in Malwa region. According to Hammira Mahakavya, written by the Jain poet Nayachandra Suri, the Chahmana ruler Hammira defeated Arjuna of Sarasapura and Bhoja of Dhara. Based on this, R. C. Majumdar c ... Read »


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    • Bilkha

    • Bilkha is a village in Junagadh Taluka of Junagadh district in Gujarat, India. Bilkha lies at the foot of the Girnar clump in the south-east corner. According to a legend, Bilkha was the ancient Balisthan or residence of the legendary king Bali. It is situated about eighteen miles east of Vamansthali (the present ... Read »


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    • Billy the Kid Trail

    • The Billy the Kid Trail, or Broken Trail that runs from Lincoln County through Capitan, New Mexico used by William H Bonnie aka Billy The Kid and his group during the Lincoln County War. After a trail nicknamed "The Mexican Blackbird" was proven to be false, Bonnie along with Regulators Charlie Bowdre, Doc Skurlock, Da ... Read »


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    • Bilsæte


    • Birtsmorton Court

    • Birtsmorton Court is a Grade I listed fortified medieval moated manor house near Malvern in Worcestershire, in the former woodlands of Malvern Chase. It is located in Birtsmorton, a small agricultural parish 7 miles south-east of Malvern Wells, Worcestershire and 8 miles west of Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire. The house ... Read »


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    • Bit Adini

    • Bit Adini, a city or region of Syria, called sometimes Bit Adini in Assyrian sources, was an Aramaean state that existed as an independent kingdom during the 10th and 9th centuries BC, with its capital at Til Barsib (now Tell Ahmar). In 856 BC, the kingdom was conquered and absorbed into the Assyrian Empire during the ... Read »


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    • Black Aggie

    • Black Aggie is the folkloric name given to a statue formerly placed on the grave of General Felix Agnus in Druid Ridge Cemetery in Pikesville, Maryland. It is an unauthorized replica — rendered by Edward Ludwig Albert Pausch — of sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens' 1891 allegorical figure, popularly called Grief ... Read »


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    • Black people in Ancient Roman history

    • Black people in ancient Rome originated from Africa. They had a small demographic within the Roman city, but they were prominent in Rome's African provinces. Black people in Antiquity were involved in a variety of occupations, such as industry, military, and slavery. Black people did not appear in literature until the ... Read »


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    • Blade mill

    • A blade mill was a variety of water mill used for sharpening newly fabricated blades, including scythes, swords, sickles, and knives. In the Sheffield area, they were known as cutlers wheels, scythesmiths wheels, etc. Examples are preserved in Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet. They also existed in the 17th century and 18th ... Read »


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    • Boresch III of Ossegg and Riesenburg

    • Boresch III of Ossegg and Riesenburg (died before 1312) was a Bohemian aristocrat of the House of Riesenburg. The son of Boresch II (also Bohuslav II) was a member of the regional court (Landgericht) in 1291. At the end of the 13th century ore mining flourished on the Riesenburg estates. On 22 March 1302 he signed a t ... Read »


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    • Bric-à-brac


    • British Association for Local History

    • The British Association for Local History (BALH) is a membership organisation that exists to promote the advancement of public education through the study of local history and to encourage and assist the study of local history throughout Great Britain as an academic discipline and as a leisure activity. BALH was found ... Read »


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    • British Society for the History of Pharmacy

    • The British Society for the History of Pharmacy is the organisation in the United Kingdom devoted to the history of pharmacy. The society has published a journal, the Pharmaceutical Historian, since 1967. It is affiliated to the British Society for the History of Medicine. ... Read »


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    • Brotherhood (religious community)

    • Brotherhoods (Ukrainian: братства, bratstva; literally, "fraternities") were the secular unions of Eastern Orthodox citizens or lay societies affiliated with individual churches in the cities throughout Ruthenian part of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth such as Lviv, Wilno, Lutsk, Vitebsk ... Read »


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    • Buke (Japan)

    • Buke (武家?) can be defined as "a martial house or a member of such a house" (Samurai). However, the term is more closely translated to law or governing authority. Buke is used when describing an individual or group of individuals that have authority. ... Read »


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    • Bulawayo (Zulu empire)

    • Kwa-Bulawayo (prefixed according to context with 'gu-' or 'kwa-') was the royal kraal of Shaka Zulu, and as such was the capital of the early Zulu empire. It was founded after Shaka's conquest of the Ndwandwe kingdom, in around 1820. It was here that Shaka first met Western traders from Port Natal. After Shaka's assass ... Read »


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    • Buni culture

    • Buni culture is a prehistoric clay pottery culture that flourished in coastal northern West Java and Banten around 400 BCE to 100 CE and probably survived until 500 CE. The culture was named after its first discovered archaeological site, Buni village in Babelan, Bekasi, east of Jakarta. Buni culture is known for its ... Read »


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    • Byzantine–Sasanian War of 440


    • Calcutta Historical Society

    • The Calcutta Historical Society was a learned society of Indian history founded in 1907. It published a journal Bengal, Past & Present, of which Walter K. Firminger was the first editor. ... Read »


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    • Center for Documentation of Cultural and Natural Heritage


    • Centum gravamina teutonicae nationis

    • The Centum gravamina teutonicae nationis, or Gravamina for short, was a list of "one hundred grievances [see gravamen] of the German nation" directed at the Catholic Church in Germany, brought forward by the German princes, Fürsten, assembled at the Diet of Nuremberg in 1522–23. They were in fact the second boo ... Read »


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    • Charcoal pile

    • A charcoal pile is a carefully arranged pile of wood, covered by turf or other layer, inside which a fire is lit in order to produce charcoal. The pile is tended by a charcoal burner. It is similar to a charcoal kiln, but the latter is usually a permanent structure made of e.g. stone. Heart (Kern or Quandel) of th ... Read »


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    • Chester County Historical Society

    • Chester County Historical Society Headquarters

      www.chestercohistorical.org Chester County Historical Society is a non-profit historical society, founded in 1893, dedicated to collecting, preserving, and exhibiting the history of Chester County, Pennsylvania and the surrounding area. The Historical Society is located at 225 North High Street in downtown West Cheste ... Read »


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    • Chinese Cultural Fever

    • Chinese Cultural Fever - (Chinese, trad. 文化熱, simpl. 文化热, pinyin Wénhuàrè) was a cultural tendency in China in the late 1980s, started with economic reforms. It can be considered the first independent cultural initiative in China since 1949. After a period of isolation, China open ... Read »


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    • Chronica Gallica of 511

    • The Chronica or Cronaca Gallica of 511, also called the Gallic Chronicle of 511, is a chronicle of Late Antiquity preserved today in a single manuscript of the thirteenth century now in Madrid. It resembles in all its traits another late antique Gallic chronicle, the Chronica Gallica of 452, of which it may be a contin ... Read »


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    • Chuchle battle

    • Chuchle battle was a student brawl fought in a Chuchle restaurant on June 29, 1881, resulting in several wounds and a general hangover, a swatch of Czech and German chauvinism in the late 19th century, just before the Charles-Ferdinand University was divided into Czech Charles-Ferdinand University and German Charles-Fe ... Read »


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    • Church history

    • Church history or ecclesiastical history as an academic discipline studies the history of Christianity and the way the Christian Church has developed since its inception. Henry Melvill Gwatkin defined church history as "the spiritual side of the history of civilized people ever since our Master's coming". A. M. Renwic ... Read »


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    • CILAC

    • The Comité d'Information et de Liaison pour l'Archéologie, l'Étude et la Mise en Valeur du Patrimoine Industriel (CILAC) is a French non-profit organisation. Its aims are to assist the work of associations, learned societies and museums interested in the conservation and protection of the world's industrial he ... Read »


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    • City Council of Singapore

    • The City Council of Singapore, or the Singapore Municipal Commission before 1951, was the administrative council of the City of Singapore responsible for the provision of water, electricity, gas, roads and bridges and street lighting. It was dissolved in 1959 when Singapore became self-governing and subsequently abolis ... Read »


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    • City of Auckland by-election, 1893

    • City of Auckland by-election, 1893

      William Lee ReesLiberal Alfred CadmanLiberal The City of Auckland by-election of 1893 was a by-election held on 4 August 1893 during the 11th New Zealand Parliament in the urban upper North Island electorate of the City of Auckland. In 1893, William Lee Rees accused Alfred Cadman, the Member for Thames, of using his ... Read »


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    • Civilized core

    • Civilized Core refers to the four advanced civilizations that emerged during the 1st millennium B.C., during the earlier Iron Age after the collapse of the Bronze Age civilizations that preceded them. These were, in order of emergence, the civilizations of ... Read »


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    • Cold War International History Project

    • The Cold War International History Project is part of the History and Public Policy Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. The Project was founded in 1991 with the support of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and is located in Washington D.C.. As part of its mission, the Proje ... Read »


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    • Collectanea satis copiosa

    • The Collectanea satis copiosa (Latin: ‘The Sufficiently Abundant Collections’) was a collection of scriptural, historical, and patristic texts that was compiled to provide royal propagandists with arguments justifying Henry VIII's personal and England's provincial independence from Rome. Likely compiled aroun ... Read »


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    • First Colonial Conference

    • First Colonial Conference

      The First Colonial Conference met in London in 1887 on the occasion of Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. It was organised at the behest of the Imperial Federation League in hopes of creating closer ties between the colonies and the United Kingdom. It was attended by more than 100 delegates, mostly unofficial observers, ... Read »


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    • 1897 Colonial Conference

    • 1897 Colonial Conference

      The Colonial Conference of 1897 was a conference between the Secretary of State for the Colonies and the 11 self-governing colonies of the British Empire. The conference was convened in London by Colonial Secretary Joseph Chamberlain in 1897 on the occasion of Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria. Chamberlain's intention ... Read »


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    • 1902 Colonial Conference

    • 1902 Colonial Conference

      The Colonial Conference of 1902 followed the conclusion of the Boer War and was held on the occasion of the coronation of Edward VII. As with the previous conference, it was called by Secretary of State for the Colonies Joseph Chamberlain who opened it on 30 June 1902. Chamberlain used the occasion to resubmit his ear ... Read »


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    • Colonization on Earth


    • Columbia University Oral History Research Office

    • Columbia University Oral History Research Office was founded in 1948 by the scholar Allan Nevins. It is the world's oldest oral history program. ... Read »


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    • Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians

    • The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC) was a group of nine people appointed by the U.S. Congress in 1980 to conduct an official governmental study of Executive Order 9066 (1942), related orders during World War II, and their effects on Japanese Americans in the West and Alaska Natives ... Read »


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    • Compromise of Avranches

    • The Compromise of Avranches in 1172 marked the reconciliation of Henry II of England with the Catholic Church after the Becket controversy from 1163, which culminated with the murder in 1170 of Thomas Becket. Henry was purged of any guilt in Becket's murder, and swore to go on crusade. He agreed to allow appeals to th ... Read »


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    • Concert party (entertainment)

    • A concert party, also called a Pierrot troupe, is the collective name for a group of entertainers, or Pierrots, popular in Britain during the first half of the 20th century. The variety show given by a Pierrot troupe was called a Pierrot show. Concert parties were travelling shows of songs and comedy, often put on at ... Read »


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    • Concordat prison

    • The Concordat Prison (in Spanish, Cárcel Concordatoria) refers to the prison that the Francisco Franco regime in Spain operated for dissident Catholic priests. It was located in Zamora. Coordinates: 41°30′06″N 5°46′26″W / 41.5016°N 5.7738°W / 41.5016; -5.7738 ... Read »


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    • Confraternity book

    • A confraternity book or liber vitae is a medieval memorial book that records the names of people who have entered into a state of brotherhood with a church in some way, often by visiting it in the capacity of a pilgrim. The following is a list of some earlier medieval confraternity books: ... Read »


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    • Consensus Tigurinus

    • The Consensus Tigurinus or Consensus of Zurich was a document intended to bring unity to the Protestant churches on their doctrines of the sacraments, particularly the Lord's Supper. John Calvin, who stood in between the Lutheran view of Real Presence and the Zwinglian view of pure symbolism, wrote the first draft of t ... Read »


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    • Constance Slaughter-Harvey

    • Constance Slaughter-Harvey is a Forest, Mississippi native that became the first black judge in the state of Mississippi. Contance Slaughter-Harvey received her bachelor's degree in political science and economics from Tougaloo College with cum laude honors. After graduation, she enrolled at the University of Mississi ... Read »


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    • Convict assignment

    • Convict assignment was the practice used in many penal colonies of assigning convicts to work for private individuals. Contemporary abolitionists characterised the practice as virtual slavery, and some, but by no means all, latter-day historians have agreed with this assessment. In Australia, every penal colony except ... Read »


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    • County of Vasconia Citerior

    • The County of Vasconia Citerior (literally, the "nearer Basque country") was a medieval domain attested as of 824. It may have comprised the lands between the western Pyrenees and the river Adour. After Pepin the Short's war on Aquitaine, Charlemagne started Frankish penetration into the Duchy of Vasconia (778) by tak ... Read »


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    • Covenant (historical)

    • In a historical context, a covenant applies to formal promises that were made under oath, or in less remote history, agreements in which the name actually uses the term 'covenant', implying that they were binding for all time. One of the earliest attested covenants between parties is the so-called Mitanni treaty, datin ... Read »


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    • Crippen Point site

    • Crippen Point Site

      The Crippen Point site is a Coles Creek culture archaeological site located in Sharkey County, Mississippi. It is the archaeological type site of the Crippen Point phase(1050 to 1200 CE) for Late Coles Creek culture in the Lower Mississippi valley. The phase marks a significant change in the cultural history of the are ... Read »


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    • Critical historiography

    • Critical historiography approaches the history of art, literature or architecture from a critical theory perspective. Critical historiography is used by various scholars in recent decades to emphasize the ambiguous relationship between the past and the writing of history. A type of critical historiography can be seen, ... Read »


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    • The Crowd Called UBAD

    • The Crowd Called UBAD: Story of A People's Movement is the second book from Belizean Evan X Hyde, first published in 1972 and discussing the history of the United Black Association for Development from 1969 to 1971. ... Read »


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    • Dacianos

    • The Dacianos were a perhaps mythical group of European wanderers, said to be a caste of gypsies, who specialised in child-stealing and the manufacture of human freaks. ... Read »


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    • Esther Sumner Damon

    • Esther Sumner Damon (August 1, 1814 - November 11, 1906) was cited as the last widow of the American Revolutionary War to receive a state pension. Esther was born in Bridgewater, Vermont. The family had eight or nine children. Esther's father was killed by a fallen tree when she was eight years old. Esther attende ... Read »


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    • Operation Dawn 3

    • Operation Dawn 3

      Decisive Iraqi victory Operation Dawn 3 or Operation Valfajr-3 was Iran's worst defeat out of all the Dawn operations. 180,000 Iranian troops participated in this attack but withering Iraqi firepower in support of deeply entrenched troops slaughtered the advancing Iranians. The Iraqis struck back by emerging from the ... Read »


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    • Death messenger

    • Death messengers, in former times, were those who were dispatched to spread the news that an inhabitant of their city or village had died. They were to wear unadorned black and go door to door with the message, "You are asked to attend the funeral of the departed __________ at (time, date, and place)." This was all the ... Read »


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    • Declaration of Saint-Ouen

    • The Declaration of Saint-Ouen is a statement made by the future Louis XVIII on May 2, 1814, which paved the way for Bourbon Restoration. Upon landing in France, the future king rejected the provisional constitution proposed by the Senate as part of the Treaty of Paris, stating that "the principles thereof were good, b ... Read »


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    • Demilitarisation

    • Demilitarisation or demilitarization may mean the reduction of state armed forces. Demilitarisation in this sense is usually the result of a peace treaty ending a war or a major conflict. A drastic voluntary reduction in size of a victorious army is called demobilization. Demilitarisation was a policy in a number of co ... Read »


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    • Dietrich of Ringelheim


    • Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire

    • The dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire occurred de facto on 6 August 1806, when the Emperor Francis II abdicated his title and released all imperial states and officials from their oaths and obligations to the empire. Although the abdication was considered legal, the dissolution of the imperial bonds was not and seve ... Read »


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    • Dixon and Griffiths Buildings (Toronto)

    • The Dixon Building (number 49) and Griffiths Building (number 47) are parts of a heritage building located on Front Street, Toronto, Ontario. The three-and-a-half storey building is an example of Second Empire architecture and was constructed in 1872-3 according to the designs of Walter Strickland. The building is tho ... Read »


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    • Diyarbakır Fortress


    • Dobravac

    • Dobravac (Serbian Cyrillic: Добравац; fl. 1280) or Dobravec (Добравец) was a Serbian nobleman serving in the crown land of Hum, with the title of tepčija. He is mentioned in a document dated 1280 as serving the countess of Hum (Moysa serviens Dobraveçi tepçi domi ... Read »


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    • Dohna Feud

    • The Dohna Feud (German: Dohnaische Fehde) was a 14th-century dispute between the burgraves of Dohna, who resided in the Eastern Ore Mountains of Central Europe, on the one hand and Saxon nobleman, John of Körbitz (Hans von Körbitz) and the Meißen Margrave William I on the other. The feud lasted from 1385 to 14 ... Read »


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    • Dominican Party

    • The Dominican Party (Spanish: Partido Dominicano, PD) was the de facto only political party in the Dominican Republic during the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo, who ruled the country from 1930 to 1961. Its symbol was a palm tree. The Dominican Party was founded on 2 August 1931, a year after Trujillo came to powe ... Read »


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    • Dosci

    • The Dosci (Doschi) - were an ancient people dwelling along the Palus Maeotis in antiquity. Strabo describes them as living among the Maeotae, Sindi, Dandarii, Toreatae, Agri, Arrechi, Tarpetes, Obidiaceni, Sittaceni, and Aspurgiani, among others. Dosci (Doschi) is one of the Maeotae tribes, who lived in the 1st mille ... Read »


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    • Dromography

    • Dromography (Gr. δρόμος, dromos "way, street, route, corridor" + γράφω, grapho "I write") - the comparative study of organisation, history, geography and logistics of local, regional and global trade routes, and other movement, transportation and communication networks. Dromography is o ... Read »


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    • Dublin Rising 1916-2016

    • Dublin Rising 1916-2016 is a website celebrating the 100 year anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising which took place in Dublin, Ireland in Easter of 1916. The website tours the streets of Dublin, while allowing the user to interact with statements and photographs. It is narrated by the Dublin actor Colin Farrell while ... Read »


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    • Dukagjini family

    • Dukagjini family

      The Dukagjini family (Latin: Ducagini or Ducaginus, Turkish: Dukakinzâde or Dukagin Oğulları) was one of the most important feudal families in medieval Albania. The name "Ducagini" is derived from the Latin dux and the common Albanian name "Gjin". In 1281, it is mentioned for the first time, with the ment ... Read »


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    • East Danes

    • East Dane is an Anglo-Saxon ethnonym which was used in the epic Beowulf as a kenning for the Geats, the people of Götaland without Scania in southern Sweden. It was also used in an Anglo-Saxon runic poem describing the first appearance of the god Frey (called Ing, see Yngvi): In Scandinavian mythology (Ynglinga sa ... Read »


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    • Echea

    • An echea, or sounding vase (literally echoer), is a pot, chamber or vessel that is similar in function to a modern-day bass trap. They were used in ancient Greek theaters to enhance the voices of performers through resonance. They were typically made of bronze, but were also (more economically) of earthenware. Echea w ... Read »


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    • Edelin (abbot)

    • Edelin (?–1293) ruled over the Alsatian abbey of Weissenburg as its abbot from the year 1262 until his death on 15 October 1293. During his time of office, work started on the Gothic abbey church which still stands today. Because the monastery had had the majority of its possessions confiscated since the 10th cent ... Read »


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    • Edict of Coucy

    • King Francis I of France issued the Edict of Coucy on July 16, 1535, ending the persecution of Protestants that followed Nicolas Cop's speech on November 1, 1533 calling for reform in the Catholic Church, and the provocative placards that were posted almost a year later in Paris and elsewhere, attacking the Mass as a b ... Read »


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    • Edmonton Hundred Historical Society

    • The Edmonton Hundred Historical Society is a historical society devoted to the study of the area once covered by the Edmonton Hundred (a hundred being a former division of a county). The society is a registered charity No. 299073.David Pam, FRHS, was the president until his death in 2014. The society has published ove ... Read »


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    • Electrodynamic loudspeaker

    • A loudspeaker (or loud-speaker or speaker) is an electroacoustic transducer; which converts an electrical audio signal into a corresponding sound. The most widely used type of speaker in the 2010s is the dynamic speaker, invented in 1925 by Edward W. Kellogg and Chester W. Rice. The dynamic speaker operates on the same ... Read »


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    • Emireh culture

    • Emiran culture

      ↑ before Homo (Pliocene) Paleolithic EpipaleolithicMesolithic Neolithic Emiran culture was a culture that existed in the Levant (Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine) between the Middle Paleolithic and the Upper Paleolithic periods. Emiran culture apparently developed from the local Mousterian without rupture, k ... Read »


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    • Emporium (early medieval)

    • The term emporia (singular: emporium) is applied to trading settlements which emerged in north-western Europe in the sixth to seventh centuries, and persisted into the ninth century. Also known in English as wics, the emporia are characterised by their peripheral locations, usually on the shore at the edge of a kingdom ... Read »


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    • End of Communism

    • End of Communism in 1989 may refer to: ... Read »


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    • Erbherr

    • Erbherr, German for Hereditary Lord, is not only a generic description for feudal Lords whose Lordships (regardless of the title attached) had officially been made hereditary (form the start of later), but is also conferred as a formal title, of low rank (e.g. comparable to Seigneur in French), in the Holy Roman Empire ... Read »


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    • Escape Cliffs

    • Escape Cliffs is a locality on the northern coast of the Northern Territory of Australia and the site of the fourth of a series of four failed attempts to establish permanent settlement in Australia’s Top End. Escape Cliffs lies on the western coast of the Cape Hotham peninsula, and the eastern shore of Adam Bay, ... Read »


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    • Geoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex

    • Geoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex (d 1166) was an English nobleman, the second son of Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex and Rohese de Vere, Countess of Essex. During or soon after during his father's rebellion against King Stephen 1143-1144, young Geoffrey was sent or made his way to Devizes, a bas ... Read »


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    • Eugenius I of Byzantium

    • Eugenius I (died 242) was Bishop of Byzantium from 237 to 242. ... Read »


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    • Expansionism

    • In general, expansionism consists of policies of governments and states that involve territorial or economic expansion. While some have linked the term to promoting economic growth (in contrast to no growth / sustainable policies), more commonly expansionism refers to the doctrine of a state expanding its territorial b ... Read »


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    • Expert determination

    • Expert determination is a historically accepted form of dispute resolution invoked when there is not a formulated dispute in which the parties have defined positions that need to be subjected to arbitration, but rather both parties are in agreement that there is a need for an evaluation. Expert determination is a proce ... Read »


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    • Exploration of the Americas

    • The exploration of the Americas includes: ... Read »


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    • Fainting room

    • A fainting room was a private room, of which its main features/furniture were fainting couches, used during the Victorian era, to make women more comfortable during the home treatment of female hysteria. Fainting rooms were used for more privacy during home treatment pelvic massages. Such couches or sofas typically had ... Read »


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