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  • History of theatre

    History of theatre

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    • 14th-century theatre

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    • 15th-century theatre

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    • 16th-century theatre

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    • 17th-century theatre

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    • 18th-century theatre

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    • 19th-century theatre

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    • 20th-century theatre

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    • 1st-century BC theatre

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    • 21st-century theatre

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    • Ancient Greek theatre

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    • Ancient Roman theatre

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    • Boy players

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    • Burlesque

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    • English early modern theatre companies

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    • Former theatres

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    • French theatrical figures

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    • History of ballet

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    • Kabuki

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    • Lost plays

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    • Medieval drama

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    • Modernist theatre

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    • Phantasmagoria

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    • Postmodern theatre

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    • Religious vernacular drama

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    • Stage productions of plays

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    • Theatrical historians

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    • Works about theatre

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    • History of theatre

    • The history of theatre charts the development of theatre over the past 2,500 years. While performative elements are present in every society, it is customary to acknowledge a distinction between theatre as an art form and entertainment and theatrical or performative elements in other activities. The history of theatre ... Read »


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    • Intercultural theatre

    • Intercultural theater, also known as cross-cultural theatre, may transcend time, while mixing and matching cultures or subcultures. Mixing and matching is the unavoidable process in the making of inner connections and the presentations of inter-culturalities. Majority of the works in the intercultural theatre is basica ... Read »


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    • Academic drama

    • Academic drama is a theatrical movement that emerged in the mid 16th century during the Renaissance. Dedicated to the study of classical dramas for the purpose of higher education, universities in England began to produce the plays of Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca the Younger (among others) in the Greek and Roman la ... Read »


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    • Accession Day tilt

    • The Accession Day tilts were a series of elaborate festivities held annually at the court of Elizabeth I of England to celebrate her Accession Day, 17 November, also known as Queen's Day. The tilts combined theatrical elements with jousting, in which Elizabeth's courtiers competed to outdo each other in allegorical ... Read »


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    • Act to Restrain Abuses of Players

    • The Act to Restrain Abuses of Players (1606) was a censorship law passed by the English Parliament, and introduced fines for plays which 'jestingly or profanely' used the names of God or Jesus. Plays written after 1606 avoided such terms as a consequence of the act, and new editions of older plays removed profane word ... Read »


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    • American Laboratory Theatre

    • The American Laboratory Theatre was an American drama school and theatrical company located in New York City that existed during the 1920s and 1930s. It was a publicly subsidized, student-subscription organization that held fund-raising campaigns to support itself. The school itself was known as the Theatre Arts Insti ... Read »


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    • Auditorium

    • An auditorium is a room built to enable an audience to hear and watch performances at venues such as theatres. For movie theatres, the number of auditoriums is expressed as the number of screens. Auditoria can be found in entertainment venues, community halls, and theaters, and may be used for rehearsal, presentation, ... Read »


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    • Boy player

    • Boy player was an adolescent male employed by Medieval and English Renaissance playing companies. Some boy players worked for the mainstream companies and performed the female roles, as women did not perform on the English stage in this period. Others worked for "children's companies", in which all roles, not just the ... Read »


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    • Breeches role

    • A breeches role (also pants role or trouser role, travesti or "Hosenrolle") is a role in which an actress appears in male clothing. Breeches (/ˈbrɪtʃᵻz/, also "britches"), tight-fitting knee-length pants, were the standard male garment at the time breeches roles were introduced. In opera it also refers t ... Read »


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    • Buffalo Players (theatre company)

    • The Buffalo Players were a community theater group operating in Buffalo, NY from 1922 to 1926. Although only in operation for four years, they were connected with several prominent theater and film professionals, such as C. Pascal Franchot (later known as film actor Franchot Tone); Marian de Forest, founder of Zonta In ... Read »


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    • Burlesque

    • Burlesque is a literary, dramatic or musical work intended to cause laughter by caricaturing the manner or spirit of serious works, or by ludicrous treatment of their subjects. The word derives from the Italian burlesco, which, in turn, is derived from the Italian burla – a joke, ridicule or mockery. Burlesque ov ... Read »


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    • Barbara Campanini

    • Barbara Campanini, known as La Barbarina, (7 June 1721 - 7 June 1799) was a famous Italian ballerina, one of the most important ballet dancers of the 18th century. Barbara Campanini was born in Parma. She became a student at Teatro Farnese under the instruction of Antonio Rinaldi Fossano, with whom she gave her debut ... Read »


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    • Chestnut Street Theatre

    • Coordinates: 39°56′58″N 75°09′04″W / 39.9494°N 75.1511°W / 39.9494; -75.1511 The Chestnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the first theater in the United States built by entrepreneurs solely as a venue for paying audiences. The Chestnut Street The ... Read »


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    • Classical unities

    • The classical unities, Aristotelian unities, or three unities are rules for drama derived from a passage in Aristotle's Poetics. In their neoclassical form they are as follows: Aristotle dealt with the unity of action in some detail, under the general subject of "definition of tragedy", where he wrote: Now, accor ... Read »


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    • Comediehuset

    • Comediehuset (The Comedy House) or Sillgateteatern (The Herring-Street Theatre) was a Swedish theatre, active in Gothenburg from 1779 until 1833. It was the first permanent Public theatre in Gothenburg and the only one until 1816. It was located at the corner of Sillgatan, the Herring-street (now Postgatan) and Nedre K ... Read »


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    • Commedia dell'arte


    • Cuban musical theatre

    • Cuban musical theatre has its own distinctive style and history. From the 18th century (at least) to modern times, popular theatrical performances included music and often dance as well. Many composers and musicians had their careers launched in the theatres, and many compositions got their first airing on the stage. I ... Read »


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    • Carl Dahlén


    • The Darfsteller

    • The Darfsteller is a 1955 novelette by Walter M. Miller, Jr. which won the first Hugo Award for Best Novelette. It is the 21st century story of an old stage actor who has become a theater janitor in order to remain near "show biz". The theater has been overtaken by robot actors, made to look like humans, which act out ... Read »


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    • Charles Deburau

    • Jean-Charles Deburau (1829–1873) was an important French mime, the son and successor of the legendary Jean-Gaspard Deburau, who was immortalized as Baptiste the Pierrot in Marcel Carné's film Children of Paradise (1945). After his father's death in 1846, Charles kept alive his pantomimic legacy, first in Paris, ... Read »


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    • Jean-Gaspard Deburau

    • Jean-Gaspard Deburau (born Jan KaÅ¡par Dvořák; July 31, 1796 – June 17, 1846), sometimes erroneously called Debureau, was a celebrated Bohemian-French mime. He performed from around 1819 to the year of his death at the Théâtre des Funambules, which was immortalized in Marcel Carné's poetic-real ... Read »


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    • Decree on the theatres

    • On 10 thermidor year 15 (29 July 1807), Napoleon I of France signed a decree reducing the number of theatres in Paris to eight, giving the force of law to a decree of the interior minister of 25 April that same year. This measure cut short an expansion in theatres. Following is a list of the theatres that remained. G ... Read »


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    • Louis Deland

    • Louis Joseph Marie Deland (25 April 1772 – 15 April 1823) was a Swedish ballet dancer, singer, actor, choreographer and ballet master in the Royal Swedish Ballet. He is often considered the first native male star in the Royal Swedish Ballet. Louis Deland was the child of Louise-Antoine Deland, the hair dresser, p ... Read »


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    • Det Dramatiske Selskab

    • Det Dramatiske Selskab is the name for several Norwegian amateur theatre drama troupes. These troupes were the first permanent theatre troupes in the cities of Norway. The period between 1780–1830 is described by many as the age of the dramatic companies. The amateur theatre companies of Det Dramatiske Selska ... Read »


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    • Development of musical theatre

    • Development of musical theatre refers to the historical development of theatrical performance combined with music that culminated in the integrated form of modern musical theatre that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting and dance. Although music has been a part of dramatic presentations since ancient times, modern ... Read »


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    • Dramatens elevskola

    • Kungliga Dramatiska Teaterns Elevskola (Swedish for "The Royal Dramatic Theatre's acting school"), also known as Dramatens elevskola, was the acting school of Sweden's national stage, The Royal Dramatic Theatre, and for many years (1787–1964) seen as the foremost theatre school and drama education for Swedish stag ... Read »


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    • Droll

    • A droll is a short comical sketch of a type that originated during the Puritan Interregnum in England. With the closure of the theatres, actors were left without any way of plying their art. Borrowing scenes from well-known plays of the Elizabethan theatre, they added dancing and other entertainments and performed thes ... Read »


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    • English Renaissance theatre

    • English Renaissance theatre, also known as early modern English theatre, or (commonly) as Elizabethan theatre, refers to the theatre of England between 1562 and 1642. This is the style of the plays of William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson. English Renaissance theatre encompasses the period betwe ... Read »


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    • Entremés


    • Excommunication of actors by the Catholic Church

    • Excommunication of actors was both literal and metaphorical practice of demeaning the reputation of actors as individuals or of their profession as the actors as well as refusing to recognize them as the individuals deserving the benefits of the religious rites under the Catholic customs. Many bishops, priests, and mon ... Read »


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    • Fabula palliata

    • Fabula palliata is a genre of Roman drama that consists largely of Romanized versions of Greek plays.Palliata comes from pallium, the Latin word for a Greek-style cloak. It is possible that the term fabula palliata indicates that the actors who performed wore such cloaks. Another possibility is that the fabula itself i ... Read »


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    • Fin de fiesta

    • A fin de fiesta is a short theatrical piece in the Spanish Golden Age (Siglo de Oro) tradition performed after the comedia in order to send the audience home in a festive mood. This was first performed in 1798. ... Read »


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    • Theatre of France

    • Discussions about the origins of non-religious theatre ("théâtre profane") -- both drama and farce—in the Middle Ages remain controversial, but the idea of a continuous popular tradition stemming from Latin comedy and tragedy to the 9th century seems unlikely. Most historians place the origin of medieva ... Read »


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    • French history in the English-speaking theatre

    • The history of France has been the basis of plays in the English-speaking theatre since the English Renaissance theatre. Christopher Marlowe wrote The Massacre at Paris (1593), based on events during the reign of Charles IX of France, king from 1560 to 1574 and of Henry III of France, king from 1574 to 1589. In th ... Read »


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    • Alvin Goldfarb

    • Alvin "Al" Goldfarb was the tenth president of Western Illinois University. Prior to his current position from 1977 to 2002 he was on the faculty of the department of theatre at Illinois State University in Normal, where he was also chairman of the theatre department, dean of fine arts from 1988 to 1998, and provost an ... Read »


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    • Group theatre of Kolkata

    • The group theatre of Kolkata refers to a tradition in theatres in the Indian city Kolkata, which developed in the 1940s as an alternative to entertainment-oriented theatres. As opposed to commercial theatres, group theatre is "a theatre that is not professional or commercial", characterized by its tendency for experime ... Read »


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    • Harlequinade

    • Harlequinade is a British comic theatrical genre, defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as "that part of a pantomime in which the harlequin and clown play the principal parts". It developed in England between the 17th and mid-19th centuries. It was originally a slapstick adaptation or variant of the Commedia dell'ar ... Read »


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    • Hellmouth

    • Hellmouth is the entrance to Hell envisaged as the gaping mouth of a huge monster, an image which first appears in Anglo-Saxon art, and then spread all over Europe, remaining very common in depictions of the Last Judgment and Harrowing of Hell until the end of the Middle Ages, and still sometimes used during the Renais ... Read »


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    • Historia Histrionica

    • Historia Histrionica is a 1699 literary work by James Wright (1643-1713), on the subject of theatre in England in the seventeenth century. It is an essential resource for information on the actors and theatrical life of the period, providing data available nowhere else. The work's full title is Historia Histrionica: A ... Read »


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    • Inder Sabha

    • Inder Sabha (Urdu: اِندر سبها) is an Urdu play and opera written by Agha Hasan Amanat, and first staged in 1853. It is regarded as the first complete Urdu stage play ever written. The play was translated into German in the 1880s as a doctoral thesis at the University of Leizig by Friedrich Ro ... Read »


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    • Izumo no Okuni

    • Okuni (出雲の阿国, Izumo no Okuni?, born ca. 1572) was the originator of kabuki theater. She was believed to be a miko at the Grand Shrine of Izumo who began performing this new style of dancing, singing, and acting in the dry riverbeds of Kyoto. Okuni grew up in the vicinity of the Izumo shrin ... Read »


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    • Kabuki

    • Kabuki (歌舞伎?) is a classical Japanese dance-drama. Kabuki theatre is known for the stylization of its drama and for the elaborate make-up worn by some of its performers. The individual kanji, from left to right, mean sing (歌), dance (舞), and skill (伎). Kabuki is therefore sometimes transl ... Read »


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    • Karagiozis

    • Karagiozis or Karaghiozis (Modern Greek: Καραγκιόζης, Turkish; Karagöz) is a shadow puppet and fictional character of Greek folklore, originating in the Turkish shadow play Karagöz and Hacivat. He is the main character of the tales narrated in the Turkish and Greek shadow-puppet t ... Read »


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    • Paul Legrand

    • Paul Legrand (1816–1898), born Charles-Dominique-Martin Legrand, was a highly regarded and influential French mime who turned the Pierrot of his predecessor, Jean-Gaspard Deburau, into the tearful, sentimental character that is most familiar to post-19th-century admirers of the figure. He was the first of the Pari ... Read »


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    • Lille Grønnegade Theatre


    • Hilda Lund

    • Hilda Maria Lund née Lindh (21 December 1840 – 7 October 1911), was a Swedish ballerina at the Royal Swedish Ballet at the Royal Swedish Opera in . Lund was a ballet student in 1849, a second dancer in 1861 and elevated to a premier ballerina in 1866–1888. She performed the leading parts of many of the ba ... Read »


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    • Henry Lyonnet

    • Henry Lyonnet, real name Alfred Copin, (1853 - 4 February 1933) was a French writer. He is mostly known for his studies on the history of theatre and specifically for his Dictionnaire des comédiens français. under the name Alfred Copin : Under the pseudonyme Henry Lyonnet : ... Read »


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    • Mansion stage

    • A mansion stage is a stage for theatrical performances. They originated in churches where they were small wooden platforms with supports and a roof. Mansions were stage structures used in medieval theatre to represent specific locations, such as Heaven or Hell. The actors would move between these mansions as the play d ... Read »


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    • Medieval theatre

    • Medieval theatre refers to theatrical performance in the period between the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century A.D. and the beginning of the Renaissance in approximately the 15th century A.D. Medieval Theatre covers all drama produced in Europe over that thousand-year period and refers to a variety of ... Read »


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    • Memorial reconstruction

    • The term memorial reconstruction refers to the hypothesis that the scripts of some 17th century plays were written down from memory by actors who had played parts in them, and that those transcriptions were published. The theory is suggested as an explanation for the so-called "bad quarto" versions of plays, in which t ... Read »


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    • Wendy Monk

    • Wendy Elizabeth Monk (19 July 1915 – 4 January 2000), wife of theatre critic J. C. Trewin (1908–1990), whom she married on 4 October 1938. They were "an inseparable couple, whose shared interests also bore fruit in literary collaboration, they had two sons": Ion and Mark Antony. Since 2000, an award has been ... Read »


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    • Musical theatre

    • Musical theatre is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting, and dance. The story and emotional content of a musical – humor, pathos, love, anger – are communicated through the words, music, movement and technical aspects of the entertainment as an integrated whole. ... Read »


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    • Nil volentibus arduum

    • Nil volentibus arduum is a Latin expression meaning "nothing is impossible to the valiant", and the name of a seventeenth-century Dutch literary society that tried to bring French literature to the Dutch Republic. The Nil volentibus arduum literary society attempted to dictate the terms of the Dutch literary world ... Read »


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    • Noh

    • Noh (, Nō?), or Nogaku (能楽, Nōgaku?)—derived from the Sino-Japanese word for "skill" or "talent"—is a major form of classical Japanese musical drama that has been performed since the 14th century. Developed by Kan'ami and his son Zeami, it is the oldest major theatre art still regularly perfor ... Read »


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    • Ariana Nozeman

    • Ariana Nozeman (alt: A(d)riana Noseman/Nooseman): born Ariana van den Bergh (1626/1628 in Middelburg – December 7, 1661 in Amsterdam), was the first actress in The Netherlands. She made her debut on stage in 1655 at the Amsterdam Schouwburg (Amsterdam Theater) in a play by Jan Jacobsz. Schipper which accidentally ... Read »


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    • Œil du prince


    • Old Price Riots

    • The Old Price Riots of 1809 (also sometimes referred to as the O.P. or OP riots) were caused by rising prices at the new Theatre at Covent Garden, London, after the previous one had been destroyed by fire. Covent Garden was one of two "patent" theatres in London in the nineteenth century, along with Drury Lane. When Dr ... Read »


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    • Owle Schreame Awards

    • The Owle Schreame Awards were 2014 theatrical awards honouring innovation in classical theatre. They were awarded by Brice Stratford and his Owle Schreame theatre company in 2014 to commemorate the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth. The award itself was an engraved glass skull, in reference to the famous gravey ... Read »


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    • Parterre (theater audience)

    • The word parterre comes from the French par and terre and literally translated means “on the ground.” Originally, the term was used in the 16th century to refer to a formal ornamental garden, but by the mid-17th century, it was increasingly used to refer both to the ground level of a theatre where spectators ... Read »


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    • Pedrolino

    • Pedrolino is a primo zanni, or comic servant, of the Commedia dell'Arte; the name is a hypocorism of Pedro (Peter), via the suffix -lino. The character made its first appearance in the last quarter of the 16th century, apparently as the invention of the actor with whom the role was to be long identified, Giovanni Pelle ... Read »


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    • Periaktos

    • Periaktos (plural form Periaktoi, from Greek revolving) is a device used for displaying and rapidly changing theatre scenes. It was first mentioned in Vitruvius' book on architecture, De architectura (c. 14 BC) but its most intense use began in Renaissance theatre, as a result of the work of important theatrical design ... Read »


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    • Phantasmagoria

    • Phantasmagoria ( American pronunciation , also fantasmagorie, fantasmagoria) was a form of horror theatre that used one or more magic lanterns to project frightening images such as skeletons, demons, and ghosts onto walls, smoke, or semi-transparent screens, typically using rear projection to keep the lantern out ... Read »


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    • Pine Brook Country Club

    • Pine Brook Country Club began when Benjamin Plotkin purchased Pinewood Lake and the surrounding countryside on Mischa Hill in the historic village of Nichols, Connecticut. Plotkin built an auditorium with a revolving stage and forty rustic cabins and incorporated as the Pine Brook Country Club in 1930. Plotkin's dream ... Read »


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    • Pinewood Lake

    • Pinewood Lake is a natural lake located northwest of 330 feet (100 m) tall Mischa Hill in the Nichols Farms Historic District section of Trumbull, Connecticut. Pinewood Lake and its facilities are the center of a private recreational community with no public access. In addition to the lake, Pinewood Lake Associ ... Read »


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    • Playing company

    • In Renaissance London, playing company was the usual term for a company of actors. These companies were organized around a group of ten or so shareholders (or "sharers"), who performed in the plays but were also responsible for management. The sharers employed "hired men" – that is, the minor actors and the wo ... Read »


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    • Bad quarto

    • In Shakespearean scholarship, a bad quarto is a quarto-sized publication of one of Shakespeare’s plays that is considered spurious, that was pirated from a theatre without permission by someone in the audience writing it down as it was spoken. Or it would be written down later by an actor or group of actors, which ... Read »


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    • Revolving stage

    • A revolving stage is a mechanically controlled platform within a theatre that can be rotated in order to speed up the changing of a scene within a show. A fully revolving set was an innovation constructed by the hydraulics engineer Tommaso Francini for an elaborately produced pageant, Le ballet de la délivrance de R ... Read »


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    • Royal Entry

    • The Royal Entry, also known by various names, including Triumphal Entry, Joyous Entry, consisted of the ceremonies and festivities accompanying a formal entry by a ruler or his representative into a city in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period in Europe. The entry centred on a procession carrying the entering prince ... Read »


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    • Nicola Sabbatini

    • Nicola Sabbatini (1574 – 25 December 1654), also known as Niccolò Sabbatini or Nicola Sabbattini, was an Italian architect of the Baroque. A native of Pesaro, he was extremely influential at the time for his pioneering and inventive designs of theaters, stage sets, lighting and stage machinery. Working in the ... Read »


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    • Sainete

    • A sainete (farce or titbit) was a popular Spanish comic opera piece, a one-act dramatic vignette, with music. It was often placed at the end of entertainments, or between other types of performance. It was vernacular in style, and used scenes of low life. Active from the 18th to 20th centuries, it superseded the entrem ... Read »


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    • Salmacida Spolia

    • Salmacida Spolia was the last masque performed at the English Court before the outbreak of the English Civil War. Written by Sir William Davenant, with costumes, sets, and stage effects designed by Inigo Jones and with music by Lewis Richard, it was performed at Whitehall Palace on 21 January 1640. In English, the tit ... Read »


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    • Schouwburg of Van Campen

    • The Schouwburg of Van Campen (Dutch: Schouwburg van Van Campen, Dutch pronunciation: [ˈsxʌuˌbɵrx fɑn vɑn ˈkɑmpə(n)]) was a theatre located at Keizersgracht 384 in Amsterdam. It was the first city theatre, based on the Teatro Olimpico in Italy. The site is now occupied by a hotel, The Dylan T ... Read »


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    • Scottish Community Drama Association

    • The Scottish Community Drama Association (SCDA) was first founded in 1926. Throughout its history, amateur theatre companies in Scotland have generally presented repertoire in English, Lowland Scots and, more occasionally, Scottish Gaelic. The SCDA was founded during the period of the Scottish Renaissance, a time of ... Read »


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    • Shakespeare Workout

    • The Shakespeare Workout was an interdisciplinary literature, theatre history and acting class taught by Eloïse Watt, a Shakespearean actor, director and teacher, at the Michael Howard Studios in New York City from 1990 to 2004. ... Read »


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    • Skene (theatre)

    • In the Theatre of Ancient Greece and classical drama, the skene was the structure at the back of a theatre stage, initially a very light structure or just cloth hanging from a rope, but by the start of Roman Greece, a large and complex stone building on several levels. The proskenion or "space in front of the skene" be ... Read »


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    • Å kofja Loka Passion Play


    • Speak the speech

    • "Speak the speech" is a famous speech from Shakespeare's Hamlet (1601). In it, Hamlet offers directions and advice to a group of actors whom he has enlisted to play for the court of Denmark. The speech itself has played two important roles independent of the play. It has been analyzed as a historical document for clue ... Read »


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    • Stage Left (film)

    • Stage Left: A Story of Theater in San Francisco (2011) is a documentary film about the history of theater in the San Francisco Bay Area from about 1952 until 2010. The film was directed by Austin Forbord, and features Robin Williams, Peter Coyote, Herbert Blau, Tony Taccone, Oskar Eustis, Bill Irwin, Joan Holden, R. G. ... Read »


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    • Stand-up tragedy

    • Stand-up tragedy is a style of tragic performance where a performer performs in front of a live audience, speaking directly to them. The goal of Stand-up tragedy is to make the audience members cry. Stand-up tragedy performances are usually long and employ the use of various media such as video, audio, highly emotiona ... Read »


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    • Teatro di narrazione

    • Teatro di narrazione (narrative theatre) is a style of theatre, developed in Italy in the later decades of the 20th century, in which there are no actors or action, but only a "narrattore" (a neologism for narrator-actor, or "narractor") who tells the story in narrative form. During the show, the narrattore often sits ... Read »


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    • Theatre of ancient Rome

    • Theatre of ancient Rome refers to the time period of theatrical practice and performance in Rome beginning in the 4th century B.C., following the state’s transition from Monarchy to Republic. Theater of the era is generally separated into the genres of tragedy and comedy, and texts written by playwrights Plautus, ... Read »


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    • Thespis

    • Thespis (/ˈθɛspɪs/; Greek: Θέσπις; fl. 6th century BC) of Icaria (present-day Dionysos, Greece), according to certain Ancient Greek sources and especially Aristotle, was the first person ever to appear on stage as an actor playing a character in a play (instead of speaking as him or hersel ... Read »


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    • Tragedy

    • Tragedy (from the Greek: , tragōidia) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences. While many cultures have developed forms that provoke this paradoxical response, the term tragedy often refers to a specific tradition of drama that has played a unique a ... Read »


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    • Tragic carpet

    • A tragic carpet, according to the Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre, is the green cloth that was spread on the stage in seventeenth century plays for the actors to "die" on so they would not dirty their clothes. ... Read »


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    • Tragicomedy

    • Tragicomedy is a literary genre that blends aspects of both tragic and comic forms. Most often seen in dramatic literature, the term can variously describe either a tragic play which contains enough comic elements to lighten the overall mood or a serious play with a happy ending. There is no complete formal defini ... Read »


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    • Travesti (theatre)

    • Travesti (literally "disguised") is a theatrical term referring to the portrayal of a character in an opera, play, or ballet by a performer of the opposite sex. Some sources regard 'travesti' as an Italian term, some as French. Depending on sources, the term may be given as travesty,travesti, or en travesti. The Oxford ... Read »


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    • Tsar Maximilian

    • Tsar Maximilian (Russian: Царь Максимилиан) is a well-known and complex Russian folk theatre, having enjoyed wide popularity throughout European Russia from the 18th to the early 20th century. ... Read »


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    • Victorian burlesque

    • Victorian burlesque, sometimes known as travesty or extravaganza, is a genre of theatrical entertainment that was popular in Victorian England and in the New York theatre of the mid 19th century. It is a form of parody in which a well-known opera or piece of classical theatre or ballet is adapted into a broad comic pla ... Read »


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    • Walnut Street Theatre

    • Walnut Street Theatre

      The Walnut Street Theatre, at 825 Walnut Street on the corner of S. 9th Street in the Washington Square West neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is said to be the oldest continuously operating theatre in the English-speaking world and the oldest in the United States. The venue is operated by the Walnut Street T ... Read »


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  • What Else?

    • History of theatre

Extras