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  • History of clothing

    History of clothing

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    • Category:African clothing

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    • Category:History of Oceanian clothing

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    • Category:History of Asian clothing

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    • History of clothing (ancient Greece)

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    • History of clothing (Byzantine)

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    • Category:History of clothing (Europe)

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    • Category:History of clothing (Western fashion)

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    • Category:History of fashion

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    • Category:Clothing by nationality

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    • African clothing

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    • History of Asian clothing

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    • Buttons

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    • History of clothing (Europe)

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    • History of fashion

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    • Historical footwear

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    • Fur

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    • History of Oceanian clothing

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    • Textile closures

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    • History of clothing (Western fashion)

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    • History of clothing and textiles

    • The study of the history of clothing and textiles traces the availability and use of textiles and other materials and the development of technology for the making of clothing over human history. The wearing of clothing is exclusively a human characteristic and is a feature of most human societies. It is not known when ... Read »


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    • Adornment

    • An adornment is generally an accessory or ornament worn to enhance the beauty or status of the wearer. They are often worn to embellish, enhance, or distinguish the wearer, and to define cultural, social, or religious status within a specific community. When worn to show economic status, the items are often either rare ... Read »


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    • Alb

    • The alb (from the Latin Albus, meaning white), one of the liturgical vestments of the Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, and Methodist churches, is an ample white garment coming down to the ankles and is usually girdled with a cincture (a type of belt, sometimes of rope similar to the type used with monk garments). It ... Read »


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    • Alnage

    • Alnage, or aulnage (from Fr. aune, ell) is the official supervision of the shape and quality of manufactured woollen cloth. It was first ordered in the reign of Richard I that "woollen cloths, wherever they are made, shall be of the same width, to wit, of two ells within the lists, and of the same goodness in the midd ... Read »


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    • Amice

    • The amice is a liturgical vestment used mainly in the Roman Catholic church, Lutheran church, some Anglican churches, and Armenian and Polish National Catholic churches. The amice consists of a white cloth connected to two long ribbon-like attachments, by which it is fastened around the shoulders of the priest. Before ... Read »


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    • Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion

    • Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion

      The Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion is an encyclopedia about dress and ornamentation of the body in different cultures throughout history. It explores themes of personal and social identity related to the universal activity of dressing one's self. Its ten volumes are dedicated to describing and interpretin ... Read »


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    • Biblical clothing

    • The clothing of the people in Biblical times was made from wool, linen, animal skins, and perhaps silk. Most events in the Old and New Testament take place in Ancient Israel, and thus most Biblical clothing is ancient Hebrew clothing. They wore underwear and cloth skirts. Complete descriptions of the styles of dress a ... Read »


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    • History of the bikini

    • The history of the bikini can be traced back to antiquity. Illustrations of Roman women wearing bikini-like garments during competitive athletic events have been found in several locations. The most famous of them is Villa Romana del Casale. French engineer Louis Réard introduced the modern bikini, modeled by Michel ... Read »


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    • Biretta

    • The biretta (Latin: biretum, birretum) is a square cap with three or four peaks or horns, sometimes surmounted by a tuft. Traditionally the three peaked biretta is worn by Roman Catholic clergy and some Anglican and Lutheran clergy. The four peaked biretta is worn as academic dress by those holding a doctoral degree fr ... Read »


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    • Bleachfield

    • A bleachfield or croft was an open area of land (usually a field) used for spreading cloth and fabrics on the ground to be bleached by the action of the sun and water. They were usually found in and around mill towns in Great Britain and were an integral part of textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution. In ... Read »


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    • History of bras

    • The history of bras is inextricably intertwined with the social history of the status of women, including the evolution of fashion and changing views of the female body. Women have used a variety of garments and devices to cover, restrain, reveal, or modify the appearance of breasts. Bra or bikini-like garments are de ... Read »


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    • Button

    • In modern clothing and fashion design, a button is a small fastener, now most commonly made of plastic, but also frequently of metal, wood or seashell, which secures two pieces of fabric together. In archaeology, a button can be a significant artifact. In the applied arts and in craft, a button can be an example of fol ... Read »


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    • Cassock

    • The cassock, or soutane, is an item of Christian clerical clothing used by the clergy of Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican and Reformed churches, among others. "Ankle-length garment" is the literal meaning of the corresponding Latin term, vestis talaris. It is related to habit traditionally worn by nuns, monks, and ... Read »


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    • Chasuble

    • The chasuble /ˈtʃæzjʊbəl/ is the outermost liturgical vestment worn by clergy for the celebration of the Eucharist in Western-tradition Christian Churches that use full vestments, primarily in the Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, and United Methodist Church (during the Eucharist). In the Eastern Ortho ... Read »


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    • Choir dress

    • Choir dress is the traditional vesture of the clerics, seminarians and religious of Christian churches worn for public prayer and the administration of the sacraments except when celebrating or concelebrating the Eucharist. It differs from the vestments worn by the celebrants of the Eucharist, being normally made of fa ... Read »


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    • Cincture

    • The cincture is a rope-like or ribbon-like article sometimes worn with certain Christian liturgical vestments, encircling the body around or above the waist. There are two types of cinctures: one is a rope-like narrow girdle or rope-like belt around the waist. The other type is a broad ribbon of cloth that runs around ... Read »


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    • Clerical clothing

    • Clerical clothing is non-liturgical clothing worn exclusively by clergy. It is distinct from vestments in that it is not reserved specifically for services. Practices vary: is sometimes worn under vestments, and sometimes as the everyday clothing or street wear of a priest, minister, or other clergy member. In some cas ... Read »


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    • Cloak

    • A cloak is a type of loose garment that is worn over indoor clothing and serves the same purpose as an overcoat; it protects the wearer from the cold, rain or wind for example, or it may form part of a fashionable outfit or uniform. Cloaks have been used by myriad historic societies; many climates favor wearing a full- ... Read »


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    • Clothing in ancient Egypt

    • Ancient Egyptian clothes refers to clothing worn in ancient Egypt from the end of the Neolithic period (prior to 3100 BC) to the collapse of the Ptolemaic dynasty with the death of Cleopatra VII in 30 BC. Egyptian clothing was filled with a variety of colors. Adorned with precious gems and jewels, the fashions of the A ... Read »


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    • Clothing in ancient Greece

    • Clothing in Ancient Greece primarily consisted of the chiton, peplos, himation, and chlamys. Ancient Greek men and women typically wore two pieces of clothing draped about the body: an undergarment (chiton or peplos) and a cloak (himation or chlamys). Clothes were customarily homemade out of various lengths of rectangu ... Read »


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    • Clothing in ancient Rome

    • Clothing in ancient Rome generally comprised a short-sleeved or sleeveless, knee-length tunic for men and boys, and a longer, usually sleeved tunic for women and girls. On formal occasions, adult male citizens could wear a woolen toga, draped over their tunic, and married citizen women wore a woolen mantle, known as a ... Read »


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    • Clothing in the ancient world

    • The clothing used in the ancient world strongly reflects the technologies that these peoples mastered. Archaeology plays a significant role in documenting this aspect of ancient life, for fabric fibers, and leathers sometimes are well-preserved through time. In many cultures the clothing worn was indicative of the soci ... Read »


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    • Clothing in the Ragtime Era

    • Often, when people think of the ragtime era, they think of the music that defined the generation, and although that is certainly a major factor, the era also helped to define a culture in clothing as well. Because the ragtime era began in the late 19th century and transitioned into the early 20th century (approxim ... Read »


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    • Clothing technology

    • Clothing technology involves the manufacturing, materials, and design innovations that have been developed and used. The timeline of clothing and textiles technology includes major changes in the manufacture and distribution of clothing. From clothing in the ancient world into modernity the use of technology has drama ... Read »


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    • Collar (clothing)

    • In clothing, a collar is the part of a shirt, dress, coat or blouse that fastens around or frames the neck. Among clothing construction professionals, a collar is differentiated from other necklines such as revers and lapels, by being made from a separate piece of fabric, rather than a folded or cut part of the same pi ... Read »


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    • Cope

    • The cope (known in Latin as pluviale 'rain coat' or cappa 'cape') is a liturgical vestment, more precisely a long mantle or cloak, open in front and fastened at the breast with a band or clasp. It may be of any liturgical colour. A cope may be worn by any rank of the clergy, and also by lay ministers in certain circum ... Read »


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    • History of corsets

    • The croset has been an important article of clothing for several centuries, evolving as fashion trends have changed. Women, as well as some men, have used it to change the appearance of their bodies. The corset first became popular in sixteenth-century Europe, reaching the zenith of its popularity in the Victorian era ... Read »


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    • Court uniform and dress in the Empire of Japan

    • The official court dress of the Empire of Japan (大礼服, taireifuku?), used from the Meiji period until the end of the Second World War, consisted of European-inspired clothing in the Empire style. It was first introduced at the beginning of the Meiji period and maintained through the institution of the con ... Read »


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    • Cowl

    • The cowl (from the Latin , meaning "a hood") is an item of clothing consisting of a long, hooded garment with wide sleeves. Originally it may have referred simply to the hooded portion of a cloak. In contemporary usage, however, it is distinguished from a cloak or cape (cappa) by the fact that it refers to an entire cl ... Read »


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    • Dalmatic

    • The dalmatic is a long wide-sleeved tunic, which serves as a liturgical vestment in the Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican, and United Methodist churches, which is sometimes worn by a deacon at Mass or other services. Although infrequent, it may also be worn by bishops above the alb and below the chasuble. Like the cha ... Read »


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    • Devonshire Collection of Period Costume

    • The Devonshire Collection of Period Costume is a collection of historic costumes housed in the Totnes Fashion and Textiles Museum in the town of Totnes, south Devon, in southwest England. The collection includes clothing for men, women, and children, dating from the 18th century to the end of the 20th century. An annu ... Read »


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    • Dress

    • A dress (also known as a frock or a gown) is a garment consisting of a skirt with an attached bodice (or a matching bodice giving the effect of a one-piece garment). It consists of a top piece that covers the torso and hangs down over the legs. A dress can be any one-piece garment containing a skirt of any length. Dres ... Read »


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    • Earasaid

    • See also Highland dress, belted plaid. An earasaid, or arasaid is a draped garment worn in Scotland as part of traditional female highland dress. It is a belted plaid (literally, a belted blanket). Unlike belted plaids for men, it is worn at ankle length. Traditionally, it might be plain, striped or tartan; it might ... Read »


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    • Effects of tightlacing on the body

    • Tightlacing is the practice of wearing a corset that has been tightly laced to shape the body to a desired figure. This practice has been in effect since the early years of corsetry, often deplored by moralists and the subject of urban legends and cautionary tales in many centuries. For the same amount of time, doctors ... Read »


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    • Empire silhouette

    • Empire silhouette, Empire line, Empire waist or just Empire is a style in women's clothing in which the dress has a fitted bodice ending just below the bust, giving a high-waisted appearance, and a gathered skirt which is long and loosely fitting but skims the body rather than being supported by voluminous petticoats. ... Read »


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    • Epigonation

    • The epigonation (Greek: ἐπιγονάτιον, literally meaning "over the knee"), or palitza (Russian: палица, "club"), is a vestment used in some Eastern Christian churches. In Eastern Orthodoxy and Eastern Catholic Churches which follow the Byzantine Rite the palitza i ... Read »


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    • Epitrachelion

    • The epitrachelion (Greek: ἐπιτραχήλιον "around the neck"; Slavic: Епитрахиль, epitrachil; often called simply a stole in casual English-language usage) is the liturgical vestment worn by priests and bishops of the Orthodox Church and Eastern Catholic C ... Read »


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    • Fascia (sash)

    • The fascia is a sash worn by clerics and seminarians with the cassock in the Roman Catholic Church and in the Anglican Church. It is not worn as a belt but is placed above the waist between the navel and the breastbone (sternum). The ends that hang down are worn on the left side of the body and placed a little forward ... Read »


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    • Fashion

    • Fashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body, or furniture. Fashion is a distinctive and often constant trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of textile designers. Because the more technical ... Read »


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    • Focale

    • The focale (plural focalia), also known as a sudarium ("sweat cloth"), was a woolen or linen scarf worn by ancient Roman military personnel. It protected the neck from chafing by the armor. The focale is depicted widely in military scenes from Roman art, such as the relief sculpture on the Arch of Septimius Severus in ... Read »


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    • Frock Me!

    • Frock Me! is an exhibition that specialises in vintage fashion. Frock Me! was created in 2004 and takes place in Chelsea, London and in Brighton, East Sussex. Frock Me! has been influential on modern fashion trends with many buyers from High Street fashion stores sourcing inspiration for their designs and patterns from ... Read »


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    • Fulling

    • Fulling, also known as tucking or walking (spelt waulking in Scotland), is a step in woollen clothmaking which involves the cleansing of cloth (particularly wool) to eliminate oils, dirt, and other impurities, and making it thicker. The worker who does the job is a fuller, tucker, or walker, all of which have become co ... Read »


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    • Fur clothing

    • Fur clothing is clothing made of furry animal hides. Fur is one of the oldest forms of clothing; thought to have been widely used as hominids first expanded outside Africa. Some view fur as luxurious and warm; however others reject it due to moral beliefs. The term 'a fur' is often used to refer to a coat, wrap, or sha ... Read »


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    • Handkerchief skirt

    • Handkerchief skirts are skirts with asymmetric hems, created from fabric panels of different lengths sewn together, to create a hem with several corners that hang down as points. The hem resembles a handkerchief that is held by the centre so that its corners hang down as points. Handkerchief hems have been used in ... Read »


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    • Hemline

    • The hemline is the line formed by the lower edge of a garment, such as a skirt, dress or coat, measured from the floor. The hemline is perhaps the most variable style line in fashion, changing shape and ranging in height from hip-high to floor-length. What is a fashionable style and height of hemline has varied consid ... Read »


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    • High-low skirt

    • High-low skirts, also known as asymmetrical, waterfall, or mullet skirts, are skirts with a hem that is higher in the front, or side, than in the back. The high-low skirt has a full circle hem. However, the length varies from short in front to long in back. The style originates in Victorian era dresses and formal ... Read »


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    • Highland dress

    • The term highland dress describes the traditional, regional dress of the Highlands and Isles of Scotland. It is often characterised by tartan (plaid in North America) patterns in some form, including dress tartans which are modified versions which include white in place of a more prominent colour. Specific designs of s ... Read »


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    • History of swimwear

    • History of swimwear traces the changes in the styles of men's and women's swimwear over time and between cultures, and touches on the social, religious and legal attitudes to swimming and swimwear. In classical antiquity and in most cultures, swimming was either in the nude or the swimmer would merely strip to their u ... Read »


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    • Jayne Mansfield's leopard spot bikini


    • Jewish religious clothing

    • Jewish religious clothing has been influenced by Biblical commandments, modesty requirements and the contemporary style of clothing worn in many societies in which the Jews have lived. In Judaism, clothes are also a vehicle for religious ritual. Many Jewish men wore turbans, tunics, cloaks, and sandals. The tallit ... Read »


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    • Jorabs

    • Jorabs are multicolored socks with intricate patterns, knitted from the toe-up. They are usually worn in such a way as to display rich decoration. The word "Jorabs" originates from Arabic جورب (jourab) which has a general meaning of “socks”. Other known variants of the term: “çorapâ ... Read »


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    • History of knitting

    • Knitting is the process of using two or more needles to loop yarn into a series of interconnected loops in order to create a finished garment or some other type of fabric. The word is derived from knot, thought to originate from the Dutch verb knutten, which is similar to the Old English cnyttan, to knot. Its origins l ... Read »


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    • Kolpos

    • The kolpos (Greek: κόλποις κόλπον κόλπῳ, a gulf, bay or creek) is the blousing of a peplos, chiton or tunic in Ancient Greek clothing, whereby excess length of the material hangs folded over a zone (a narrow girdle). The fabric of the garment was typically cut lo ... Read »


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    • Mantle (vesture)

    • A mantle (Greek: μανδύας, mandyas; Church Slavonic: мантия, mantiya) is an ecclesiastical garment in the form of a very full cape that extends to the floor, joined at the neck, that is worn over the outer garments. In the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Eastern Catholic churches, ... Read »


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    • Mitre

    • The mitre (/ˈmaɪtər/; Greek: μίτρα, "headband" or "turban"), also spelled miter (see spelling differences), is a type of headgear now known as the traditional, ceremonial head-dress of bishops and certain abbots in traditional Christianity. Mitres are worn in the Orthodox Church, Roman Catholic ... Read »


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    • Mourning

    • Mourning is, in the simplest sense, grief over someone's death. The word is also used to describe a cultural complex of behaviours in which the bereaved participate or are expected to participate. Customs vary between cultures and evolve over time, though many core behaviors remain constant. Wearing black clothes is o ... Read »


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    • Omophorion

    • In the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic liturgical tradition, the omophorion (Greek: ὠμοφόριον, meaning "[something] borne on the shoulders"; Slavonic: омофоръ, omofor) is the distinguishing vestment of a bishop and the symbol of his spiritual and ecclesiastical au ... Read »


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    • Orarion

    • The Orarion (Greek: ὀράριον; Slavonic: Орарь, orar) is the distinguishing vestment of the deacon and subdeacon in the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodox Churches and Eastern Catholic Churches. It is a narrow stole, usually four to five inches (127 mm) wide and of various ... Read »


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    • Pelisse

    • A pelisse was originally a short fur lined or fur trimmed jacket that was usually worn hanging loose over the left shoulder of hussar light cavalry soldiers, ostensibly to prevent sword cuts. The name was also applied to a fashionable style of woman's coat worn in the early 19th century. The style of uniform incor ... Read »


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    • Pellegrina

    • The pellegrina is an item of clerical dress worn by some Catholic ecclesiastics. Similar to the mozzetta but open in front, the pellegrina is a short shoulder cape reaching to the elbow. It is made of black or white material trimmed and lined with amaranth red (for bishops) or scarlet red (for cardinals). The pope ... Read »


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    • Phelonion

    • The phelónion (Greek: φαιλόνιον (plural, φαιλόνια, phailónia; Latin paenula) is a liturgical vestment worn by a priest of the Eastern Christian tradition. It is worn over the priest's other vestments and is equivalent to the chasuble of Western Christianity. Lik ... Read »


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    • The Philippi Collection

    • The Philippi Collection is a collection of clerical, religious and spiritual headdresses. The Collection demonstrates the history, shared roots and diversity of religious-clerical head coverings. The Philippi Collection is a private collection assembled by the entrepreneur Dieter Philippi, CEO of a German telecomm ... Read »


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    • Pontifical vestments

    • Pontifical vestments, also referred to as episcopal vestments or pontificals, are the liturgical vestments worn by bishops (and by concession some other prelates) in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Eastern Catholic, Anglican, and some Lutheran churches, in addition to the usual priestly vestments for the celebrat ... Read »


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    • Posting (laundering process)

    • Posting or postadh (Scottish Gaelic) was a process in washing clothes formerly used in Scotland. It means to trample with the feet, or the act of trampling or treading. In scouring woollen clothing, blankets or coarse linen, when the strength of the arms and manual friction are found insufficient, Highland women put th ... Read »


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    • PVC clothing

    • PVC clothing, commonly known as vinyl clothing, is shiny clothing made of the plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The PVC plastic is also called vinyl. For this reason, this type of clothing is also called vinyl clothing. PVC is sometimes confused with the similarly shiny patent leather. The terms "PVC", "vinyl" and "PU ... Read »


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    • Religious habit

    • A religious habit is a distinctive set of garments worn by members of a religious order. Traditionally some plain garb recognisable as a religious habit has also been worn by those leading the religious eremitic and anchoritic life, although in their case without conformity to a particular uniform style. In the typica ... Read »


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    • Sakkos

    • The sakkos (Greek: σάκκος, "sackcloth") is a vestment worn by Orthodox and Greek Catholic bishops instead of the priest's phelonion. The garment is a tunic with wide sleeves, and a distinctive pattern of trim. It reaches below the knees and is fastened up the sides with buttons or tied with ribbons. I ... Read »


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    • R. L. Shep

    • Robert Lee "Robb" Shep (born 27 February 1933) is an American writer, publisher and textile researcher. He is commonly known by his nom de plume, R. L. Shep. Shep is known primarily for his books on textile arts — costume and period etiquette — which are either reprints of 19th century monographies or compila ... Read »


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    • Shirt

    • A shirt is a cloth garment for the upper body. Originally an undergarment worn exclusively by men and women it has become, in American English, a catch-all term for a broad variety of upper-body garments and undergarments. In British English, a shirt is more specifically a garment with a collar, sleeves with cuffs, an ... Read »


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    • Skirt

    • A skirt is the lower part of a dress or gown, covering the person from the waist downwards, or a separate outer garment serving this purpose. The hemline of skirts can vary from micro to floor-length and can vary according to cultural conceptions of modesty and aesthetics as well as the wearer's personal taste, which ... Read »


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    • Smock-frock

    • A smock-frock or smock is an outer garment traditionally worn by rural workers, especially shepherds and waggoners, in parts of England and Wales from the late 18th century. Today, the word smock refers to a loose overgarment worn to protect one's clothing, for instance by a painter. The traditional smock-frock is mad ... Read »


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    • Sock

    • A sock is an item of clothing worn on the feet and often covering the ankle and some part of the calf. Some type of shoe or boot is typically worn over socks. In ancient times, socks were made from leather or matted animal hair. In the late 16th century, machine-knit socks were first produced. Until 1800 both hand knit ... Read »


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    • Angusticlavia

    • In ancient Rome, an angusticlavia, angusticlavus, or angustus clavus was a narrow-strip tunic (tunica) with two narrow vertical red-purple stripes (clavi). The tunic was typically worn under the toga with the right side stripe visible. The angusticlavia was the tunic associated with the rank and office of the eque ... Read »


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    • Sticharion

    • The sticharion (also stikharion or stichar; Greek: στιχάριον; Slavonic: стихарь) is a liturgical vestment of the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches, roughly analogous in function to the alb of the Western Church. The sticharion is worn by all classes of ordain ... Read »


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    • Stole (vestment)

    • The stole is a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations. It consists of a band of colored cloth, formerly usually of silk, about seven and a half to nine feet long and three to four inches wide, whose ends may be straight or may broaden out. The center of the stole is worn around the back of the neck and ... Read »


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    • Suit (clothing)

    • In clothing, a suit is a set of garments made from the same cloth, usually consisting of at least a jacket and trousers. Lounge suits (also known as business suits when sober in colour and style), which originated in Britain as country wear, are the most common style of Western suit. Other types of suit still worn toda ... Read »


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    • History of suits

    • The man's suit of clothes, in the sense of a lounge or business or office suit, is a set of garments which are crafted from the same cloth. This article discusses the history of the lounge suit, often called a business suit when made in dark colours and of conservative cut. The current styles were founded in a period ... Read »


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    • Sumptuary law

    • The sumptuary laws (from Latin sumptuāriae lēgēs) are laws that attempted to regulate consumption; Black's Law Dictionary defines them as "Laws made for the purpose of restraining luxury or extravagance, particularly against inordinate expenditures in the matter of apparel, food, furniture, etc." Historically, ... Read »


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    • Surplice

    • A surplice (Late Latin superpelliceum, from super, "over" and pellicia, "fur garment") is a liturgical vestment of the Western Christian Church. The surplice is in the form of a tunic of white linen or cotton fabric, reaching to the knees, with wide or moderately wide sleeves. It was originally a long garment with ope ... Read »


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    • Tarkhan dress

    • The Tarkhan Dress, named for the Tarkhan cemetery south of Cairo in Egypt where it was excavated in 1913, is an over 5000 years old linen garment that was confirmed as the world's oldest piece of clothing. The dress coded UC28614B is currently in the collection of the University College London (UCL) Petrie Museum of E ... Read »


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    • Tenterground

    • A tenterground or tenter ground was an area used for drying newly manufactured cloth after fulling. The wet cloth was hooked onto frames called tenters and stretched taut so that the cloth would dry flat and square. It is from this process that some have the expression "on tenterhooks", meaning in a state of nervous t ... Read »


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    • Thracian clothing

    • Thracian clothing refers to types of clothing worn mainly by Thracians, Dacians but also by some Greeks. Its best literal descriptions are given by Herodotus and Xenophon in his Anabasis. Depictions are found in a great number of Greek vases and there are a few Persian representations as well. In contrast to shapes and ... Read »


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    • Tights

    • Tights are a kind of cloth garment, most often sheathing the body from the waist to the toe tips with a tight fit, hence the name. They come in absolute opaque, opaque, sheer and fishnet styles or a combination of them, such as the original concept of the American term pantyhose with sheer legs and opaque panty. Wearin ... Read »


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    • Timeline of clothing and textiles technology

    • This timeline of clothing and textiles technology covers the events of fiber and flexible woven material worn on the body; including making, modification, usage, and knowledge of tools, machines, techniques, crafts, and systems (technology). ... Read »


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    • Tippet

    • A tippet is a scarf-like narrow piece of clothing, worn over the shoulders. It may also be likened to a stole in the secular rather than ecclesiastic sense of this word. Tippets evolved in the fourteenth century from long sleeves and typically had one end hanging down to the knees. In later fashion, a tippet is often a ... Read »


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    • Tunicle

    • The tunicle is a liturgical vestment associated with Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, and Lutheranism. For a description of the tunicle, see dalmatic, the vestment with which it became identical in form, although earlier editions of the Caeremoniale Episcoporum indicated that it should have narrower sleeves. Sometimes ... Read »


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    • Uniformology

    • Uniformology is a branch of the auxiliary sciences of history which studies uniforms - especially military uniforms - through ages and civilizations. ... Read »


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    • Veil

    • A veil is an article of clothing or cloth hanging that is intended to cover some part of the head or face, or an object of some significance. It is especially associated with women and sacred objects. One view is that as a religious item, it is intended to show honor to an object or space. The actual sociocultural, ps ... Read »


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    • Vestment

    • Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religion, especially among the Eastern Orthodox, Catholics (Latin Church and others), Anglicans, and Lutherans. Many other groups also make use of liturgical garments; this was a point of controversy in the Protestant Reformation and ... Read »


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    • Vintage clothing

    • Vintage clothing is a generic term for garments originating from a previous era. The phrase is also used in connection with a retail outlet, e.g. "vintage clothing store." Generally speaking, clothing which was produced before the 1920s is referred to as antique clothing and clothing from the 1920s to 20 years bef ... Read »


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    • Weavers' cottage


    • Zone (vestment)

    • The Zone (Greek: ζώνη, zonē) is a form of girdle or belt common in the ancient eastern Mediterranean. The term occurs in Homer, for instance, as (Greek: ζώνην, zonēn) girdle and can also refer to the waist itself. Classical Greek had a verb (Greek: ζώννυσθαι, ... Read »


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    • Zucchetto

    • The zucchetto (/tsʊˈkɛtoʊ/;Italian pronunciation: [dzukˈketto; tsuk-]; meaning "small gourd", from zucca, "pumpkin") is a small, hemispherical, form-fitting ecclesiastical skullcap worn by clerics of various Catholic Churches, the Syriac Orthodox Church, and by the higher clergy in Anglicanism. The pl ... Read »


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  • What Else?

    • History of clothing

Extras