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  • Historical footwear

    Historical footwear

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Historical footwear

    • Areni-1 shoe

    • The Areni-1 shoe is a 5,500-year-old leather shoe that was found in 2008 in excellent condition in the Areni-1 cave complex located in the Vayots Dzor province of Armenia. It is a one-piece leather-hide shoe that has been dated as a few hundred years older than the one found on Ötzi the Iceman, making it the oldest ... Read »


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    • Buskin

    • A buskin is a knee- or calf-length boot made of leather or cloth which laces closed, but is open across the toes. It was worn by Athenian tragic actors, hunters and soldiers in Ancient Greek, Etruscan, and Roman societies. The word buskin, only recorded in English since 1503 meaning "half boot", is of unknown origin, ... Read »


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    • Calceology

    • Calceology (from Latin calcei "shoes" and -λογία, -logiā, "-logy") is the study of footwear, especially historical footwear whether as archaeology, shoe fashion history, or otherwise. It is not yet formally recognized as a field of research. Calceology comprises the examination, registration, research ... Read »


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    • Calceus

    • Calceus, Latin for shoe or boot, was hobnailed footwear secured by laces in ancient Rome. Mulleus calceus were a red or purple shoe worn by the three highest magistrates in Ancient Rome. Rex sacrorum wore toga, the undecorated soft "shoeboot" (calceus) and carried a ceremonial axe. As early as the 2nd century BC, and ... Read »


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    • Caligae

    • Caligae (Latin; singular caliga) are heavy-soled hobnailed military boots known for being issued to Roman legionary soldiers and auxiliaries throughout the Roman Republic and Empire. The caligae can resemble modern sandals but were actually marching boots. Sandals proper were not worn outside by the Romans, rather the ... Read »


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    • Chopine

    • A chopine is a type of women's platform shoe that was popular in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. Chopines were originally used as a patten, clog, or overshoe to protect the shoes and dress from mud and street soil. Chopines were popularly worn in Venice by both courtesans and patrician women from ca. 1400–1700 ... Read »


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    • Crakow (shoe)

    • Crakows or crackowes were a style of shoes with extremely long toes very popular in the 15th century. They were so named because the style was thought to have originated in Kraków, then the capital of Poland. They are also sometimes known as poulaines or pikes, though the term poulaine, as in souliers a la poulaine, ... Read »


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    • Episcopal sandals

    • The episcopal sandals, also known as the pontifical sandals, are a Roman Catholic pontifical vestment worn by bishops when celebrating liturgical functions according to the pre-Vatican II rubrics, for example a Tridentine Solemn Pontifical Mass. In shape, the episcopal sandals more closely resemble a pair of loafers t ... Read »


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    • Hessian (boot)

    • Hessian (/ˈhɛsiən/; from Hesse in Germany) refers to a style of light boot that became popular from the beginning of the 19th century. Initially used as standard issue footwear for light cavalry regiments, especially hussars, they would become widely worn by civilians as well. The boots had a low heel, and a s ... Read »


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    • Pampootie

    • Pampooties are raw-hide shoes, which were formerly made and worn on the Aran Islands of County Galway, Ireland. They are formed of a single piece of untanned hide folded around the foot and stitched with twine or a leather strap. Hide from the buttocks was most often used. The hair was usually left and this improved ... Read »


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    • Papal shoes

    • The Papal shoes were the red leather outdoor shoes worn by the Pope. They should not be confused with the indoor Papal Slippers or the Episcopal sandals, which are the liturgical footwear proper to all ordained Catholic bishops of the Latin Rite. As did many noblemen, the Pope wore slippers (pantofole) inside his ... Read »


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    • Papal Slippers

    • The Papal Slippers are an historical accoutrement worn by the Bishop of Rome. The papal slippers were a form of episcopal sandals worn by bishops. However, unlike the (rarely seen) episcopal sandals, which change with the liturgical colour, the papal slippers were always red. Usually elaborate, papal slippers were mad ... Read »


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    • Pigache

    • Pigache, Poulaine and Pigage are types of shoe with a long pointed turned up toe that was worn during the Romanesque and Byzantine period. The plural form of the word is pigaciae. The shoes were sometimes stuffed with moss, wool, or horsehair to make the extension erect. The protrusion was sometimes flesh colored. In ... Read »


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    • Sabaton

    • A sabaton or solleret is part of a knight's armour that covers the foot. Fourteenth and fifteenth century sabatons typically end in a tapered point well past the actual toes of the wearer's foot, following fashionable shoe shapes of the fourteenth century. Sabatons of the first half of sixteenth century end at the tip ... Read »


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    • Soccus

    • A soccus, meaning slipper in Latin, is a loosely fitting shoe that has no ties, a sole without hobnails, and a separate leather upper. They were worn by the Ancient Romans, at first especially by comic actors (compare the cothurnus for tragic actors). Later it became popular with the general public, with several types ... Read »


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    • Historical footwear

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