Main

  • Health economics

    Health economics

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Health economics

    • Health economics journals

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Health economics journals


      Wikipedia
    • Health economists

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Health economists


      Wikipedia
    • Healthcare reform in the United States

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Healthcare reform in the United States


      Wikipedia
    • Healthcare management

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Healthcare management


      Wikipedia
    • Medical statistics

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Medical statistics


      Wikipedia
    • Health policy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Health policy


      Wikipedia
    • Public health

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Public health


      Wikipedia
    • Publicly funded health care

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Publicly funded health care


      Wikipedia
    • Medicine and healthcare trade unions

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Medicine and healthcare trade unions


      Wikipedia
    • Health economics

    • Health economics is a branch of economics concerned with issues related to efficiency, effectiveness, value and behavior in the production and consumption of health and healthcare. In broad terms, health economists study the functioning of healthcare systems and health-affecting behaviors such as smoking. A seminal 19 ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • All-payer rate setting

    • All-payer rate setting is a price setting mechanism in which all third parties pay the same price for services at a given hospital. The system does not imply that charges are the same for every hospital. It can be used to increase the market power of payers (such as private and/or public insurance companies) to mitigat ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Andersen healthcare utilization model

    • The Andersen Healthcare Utilization Model - is a conceptual model aimed at demonstrating the factors that lead to the use of health services. According to the model, usage of health services (including inpatient care, physician visits, dental care etc.) is determined by three dynamics: predisposing factors, enabling fa ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Capitation (healthcare)

    • Capitation is a payment arrangement for health care service providers such as physicians or nurse practitioners. It pays a physician or group of physicians a set amount for each enrolled person assigned to them, per period of time, whether or not that person seeks care. These providers generally are contracted with a t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Case mix

    • Case mix, also casemix and patient mix, is a term used within healthcare as a synonym for cohort; essentially, a case mix groups statistically related patients. An example case mix might be male patients under the age of 50, who present with a myocardial infarction and also undergo emergency coronary artery bypass surg ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Centre for Reviews and Dissemination

    • The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) is a health services research centre based at the University of York, England. CRD was established in January 1994, and aims to provide research-based information for evidence-based medicine. CRD carries out systematic reviews and meta-analyses of healthcare interventions, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Choosing Healthplans All Together

    • "Choosing Healthplans All Together" (CHAT) is the name given to a simulation exercise in which players decide which benefit types (e.g. hospitalization, consultations, tests, imaging, medicines, etc.) they would like to include in their health insurance package, and what level of service (basic or high) they prioritize ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Clinical peer review

    • Clinical Peer Review is the process by which health care professionals evaluate each other’s clinical performance. Clinical peer review is segmented by discipline. No inter-disciplinary models for clinical peer review have been described. Physician Peer Review is most common and is found in virtually all hospitals ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Comparative effectiveness research

    • Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is the direct comparison of existing health care interventions to determine which work best for which patients and which pose the greatest benefits and harms. The core question of comparative effectiveness research is which treatment works best, for whom, and under what circumst ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cost of HIV treatment

    • The cost of HIV treatment is a complicated issue because of the high cost of developing HIV treatments versus an urgent lifesaving need across cultural boundaries to access HIV treatments. One way to state the issue would be to say that the treatments, typically drug regimens, are the products of extremely costly and r ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cost sharing

    • In health care, cost sharing occurs when patients pay for a portion of health care costs not covered by health insurance. The "out-of-pocket" payment varies among healthcare plans and depends on whether or not the patient chooses to use a healthcare provider who is contracted with the healthcare plan's network. Example ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cost-effectiveness analysis

    • Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is a form of economic analysis that compares the relative costs and outcomes (effects) of different courses of action. Cost-effectiveness analysis is distinct from cost–benefit analysis, which assigns a monetary value to the measure of effect. Cost-effectiveness analysis is often ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cost-minimization analysis

    • Cost-minimization is a tool used in pharmacoeconomics to compare the cost per course of treatment when alternative therapies have demonstrably equivalent clinical effectiveness. Therapeutic equivalence (including adverse reactions, complications and duration of therapy) must be referenced by the author conducting the ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cost-shifting

    • Cost-shifting is either an economic situation where one individual, group, or government underpays for a service, resulting another individual, group or government overpaying for a service (shifting compared to expected burden). It can occur where one group pays a smaller share of costs than before, resulting in anothe ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cost–utility analysis


    • Critical illness insurance

    • Critical illness insurance, otherwise known as critical illness cover or a dread disease policy, is an insurance product in which the insurer is contracted to typically make a lump sum cash payment if the policyholder is diagnosed with one of the specific illnesses on a predetermined list as part of an insurance policy ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Death panel

    • "Death panel" is a term that originated during the 2009 debate about federal health care legislation to cover the uninsured in the United States.Sarah Palin, former Republican Governor of Alaska, coined the term when she charged that proposed legislation would create a "death panel" of bureaucrats who would decide whet ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Deductible

    • In an insurance policy, the deductible is the small amount that must be paid out of pocket by patient to the physician before an Insurance Company will pay any expenses. In general usage, the term deductible may be used to describe one of several types of clauses that are used by insurance companies as a threshold for ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dental tourism

    • Dental tourism (also called dental vacations or commonly known as dental holidays in Europe) is a subset of the sector known as medical tourism. It involves individuals seeking dental care outside of their local healthcare systems and may be accompanied by a vacation. Dental tourism is growing worldwide: as the world b ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Disability management program

    • A disability management program, or DMP, is used by employers to assist employees who are unable to work due to injury or illness. The DMP consists of several components, however not all DMPs have all possible components. Smaller programs may only include the basic components while larger programs generally have more c ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Disability-adjusted life year

    • The disability-adjusted life year (DALY) is a measure of overall disease burden, expressed as the number of years lost due to ill-health, disability or early death. It was developed in the 1990s as a way of comparing the overall health and life expectancy of different countries. The DALY is becoming increasingly commo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Diseases of poverty

    • Diseases of poverty is a term sometimes used to collectively describe diseases, disabilities, and health conditions that are more prevalent among the poor than among wealthier people. In many cases poverty is considered the leading risk factor or determinant for such diseases, and in some cases the diseases themselves ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Economic evaluation

    • Economic evaluation is the process of systematic identification, measurement and valuation of the inputs and outcomes of two alternative activities, and the subsequent comparative analysis of these. The purpose of economic evaluation is to identify the best course of action, based on the evidence available. It is most ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Economic impact of HIV/AIDS


    • EMBRACE Healthcare Reform Plan

    • The Expanding Medical and Behavioral Resources with Access to Care for Everyone (EMBRACE) plan is a healthcare system reform proposal introduced by a group called Healthcare Professionals for Healthcare Reform (HPfHR). The plan incorporates elements of private health insurance, single-payer and fee-for-service models i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Disease burden

    • Disease burden is the impact of a health problem as measured by financial cost, mortality, morbidity, or other indicators. It is often quantified in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) or disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), both of which quantify the number of years lost due to disease (YLDs). One DALY can ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • EQ-5D

    • EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D) is a standardized instrument for measuring generic health status. The health status measured with EQ-5D is used for estimating preference weight for that health status, then by combining the weight with time, quality-adjusted life year (QALY) can be computed. QALYs gained i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Equalization pool

    • An equalization pool is a fund created to level out differences in financial risk, often across long periods of time, in a process known as risk equalization. Examples include mandatory health insurance and grower co-operatives. In health insurance, equalization pools are used in countries such as Ireland, Austral ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Exchange Information Disclosure Act

    • Exchange Information Disclosure Act

      The Exchange Information Disclosure Act (H.R. 3362) is a bill that would require the United States Department of Health and Human Services to submit weekly reports to Congress about how many people are using HealthCare.gov and signing up for health insurance. These reports would be due every Monday until March 31, 2015 ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Federal Compulsory Medical Insurance Fund (Russia)

    • Federal Compulsory Medical Insurance Fund (Russian: Федеральный фонд обязательного медицинского страхования) is one of the state budget funds established to finance me ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Fee splitting

    • Fee splitting is the practice of sharing fees with professional colleagues, such as physicians or lawyers, in return for being sent referrals This is essentially the payment of a commission to the referrer with the express intention of ensuring that the referring doctor directs referrals of patients to the payee. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Fee-for-service

    • Fee-for-service (FFS) is a payment model where services are unbundled and paid for separately. In health care, it gives an incentive for physicians to provide more treatments because payment is dependent on the quantity of care, rather than quality of care. Similarly, when patients are shielded from paying (cost-sharin ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Free-market healthcare

    • In a system of free-market healthcare, prices for healthcare goods and services are set freely by agreement between patients and health care providers, and the laws and forces of supply and demand are free from any intervention by a government, price-setting monopoly, or other authority. A free market contrasts with a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Group purchasing organization

    • In the United States, a group purchasing organization (GPO) is an entity that is created to leverage the purchasing power of a group of businesses to obtain discounts from vendors based on the collective buying power of the GPO members. Many GPOs are funded by administrative fees that are paid by the vendors that GPOs ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health administration

    • Health administration or healthcare administration is the field relating to leadership, management, and administration of public health systems, health care systems, hospitals, and hospital networks. Health systems management or health care systems management describes the leadership and general management of hosp ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health care finance in the United States

    • Health care spending in the United States is characterized as the most costly compared to all OECD (developed) countries, measured both per person and as a share of GDP. Despite this spending, the quality of health care overall is low by some measures. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid reported in 2014 that U.S. h ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health care prices in the United States

    • Unlike most markets for consumer services in the United States, the health care market generally lacks transparent market-based pricing. Patients are typically not able to comparison shop for medical services based on price, as medical service providers do not typically disclose prices prior to service. Government mand ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health care ratings

    • Health care ratings are ratings or evaluations of health care. Technological advances played a key role in facilitating the data collection and number crunching needed to generate health care ratings. Health care ratings are coming of age in a time of rising levels of consumer health literacy. Surveys consistently sh ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health care rationing

    • Health care rationing refers to mechanisms that are used to allocate (viz. ration) health care resources. Healthcare rationing in the United States is largely accomplished through market forces, though major government programs include Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Affairs, and the Indian Health Service. Most Ameri ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Comparison of the healthcare systems in Canada and the United States

    • Comparison of the healthcare systems in Canada and the United States is often made by government, public health and public policy analysts. The two countries had similar healthcare systems before Canada changed its system in the 1960s and 1970s. The United States spends much more money on healthcare than Canada, on bot ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health economics (Germany)

    • Health economics in Germany can be considered as a collective term for all activities that have anything to do with health in this country. This interpretation done by in 2002 seems, however, very generous due to several overlaps with other economic sectors. A simple outline of the health sector in three areas provide ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health equity

    • Health equity refers to the study and causes of differences in the quality of health and healthcare across different populations. Health equity is different from health equality, as it refers only to the absence of disparities in controllable or remediable aspects of health. It is not possible to work towards complete ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health impact assessment

    • Health impact assessment (HIA) is defined as "a combination of procedures, methods, and tools by which a policy, program, or project may be judged as to its potential effects on the health of a population, and the distribution of those effects within the population." (ECHP 1999, p. 4) HIA is intended to produce ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health services research

    • Health services research (HSR), also known as health systems research or health policy and systems research (HPSR), is a multidisciplinary scientific field that examines how people get access to health care practitioners and health care services, how much care costs, and what happens to patients as a result of this car ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health system

    • A health system, also sometimes referred to as health care system or as healthcare system, is the organization of people, institutions, and resources that deliver health care services to meet the health needs of target populations. There is a wide variety of health systems around the world, with as many histories and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health Utilities Index

    • The Health Utilities Index (HUI) is a rating scale used to measure general health status and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HUI questionnaires are designed to map onto two classification systems, HUI-2 and HUI-3, capable of measuring 24,000 and 972,000 unique health states, respectively. HUI classifications me ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio

    • The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) is a statistic used in cost-effectiveness analysis to summarise the cost-effectiveness of a health care intervention. It is defined by the difference in cost between two possible interventions, divided by the difference in their effect. It represents the average increment ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Inequality in disease

    • This article discusses social inequality in the United States and its effects on individual health, and more specifically likelihood of developing diseases. While rates of incidence for many diseases vary based on biological factors and inheritable characteristics, a larger disparity, which cannot be explained by biol ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health insurance

    • Health insurance is insurance against the risk of incurring medical expenses among individuals. By estimating the overall risk of health care and health system expenses, among a targeted group, an insurer can develop a routine finance structure, such as a monthly premium or payroll tax, to ensure that money is availabl ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Inverse benefit law

    • The inverse benefit law states that the ratio of benefits to harms among patients taking new drugs tends to vary inversely with how extensively a drug is marketed. Two Americans, Howard Brody and Donald Light, have defined the inverse benefit law, inspired by Tudor Hart's inverse care law. A drug effective for a serio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Inverse care law

    • The inverse care law is the principle that the availability of good medical or social care tends to vary inversely with the need of the population served. Proposed by Julian Tudor Hart in 1971, the term has since been widely adopted. It is a pun on inverse-square law, a term and concept from physics. The law states th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Iron Triangle of Health Care

    • The concept of the The Iron Triangle of Health Care was first introduced in William Kissick’s book, Medicine’s Dilemmas: Infinite Needs Versus Finite Resources in 1994, describing three competing health care issues: access, quality, and cost containment. Each of the vertices represents identical priorities. I ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Jon Magnussen

    • Jon Magnussen (born 12 August 1959) is a Norwegian Professor in health economics and Head of Department of Public Health and General Practice at Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. Organization and financing of health care services and productivity and efficiency in the health care secto ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Maryland hospital payment system

    • Since the late 1970s, the Maryland hospital payment system has employed an all-payer system for hospital services in which all payers pay the same amount for a given service at a particular hospital. An independent commission establishes the rate structure for each hospital. The system eliminated hospital cost shifting ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Medical case management

    • Medical case management is a collaborative process that facilitates recommended treatment plans to assure the appropriate medical care is provided to disabled, ill or injured individuals. It is a role frequently overseen by patient advocates. It refers to the planning and coordination of health care services appropria ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Medical savings account

    • A medical savings account (MSA) is an account into which tax-deferred amounts from income can be deposited. The amounts are often called contributions and may be made by a worker, an employer, or both, depending on a country's laws. The money in such accounts is to be used to pay for medical expenses. Withdrawals from ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Medical–industrial complex


    • Microinsurance

    • Microinsurance is the protection of low-income people (those living on between approximately $1 and $4 per day( below $4)) against specific perils in exchange for regular premium payment proportionate to the likelihood and cost of the risks involved. This definition is exactly the same as one might use for regular insu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National health insurance

    • National health insurance (NHI) – sometimes called statutory health insurance (SHI) – is a legally enforced scheme of health insurance that insures a national population against the costs of health care. It may be administered by the public sector, the private sector, or a combination of both. Funding mechani ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National Health Interview Survey

    • The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is an annual, cross-sectional survey intended to provide nationally representative estimates on a wide range of health status and utilization measures among the nonmilitary, noninstitutionalized population of the United States. Each annual data set can be used to examine the ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence

    • The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an executive non-departmental public body of the Department of Health in the United Kingdom. It serves both the English NHS and the Welsh NHS. It was set up as the National Institute for Clinical Excellence in 1999, and on 1 April 2005 joined with the Heal ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Nosokinetics

    • Nosokinetics is the science/subject of measuring and modelling the process of care in health and social care systems.Nosokinetics brings together the Greek words for noso: disease and kinetics: movement. Black box models are currently used to plan changes in health and social care systems. These input-output models ov ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ochs v. Commissioner

    • Ochs v. Commissioner, 195 F.2d 692 (2nd Cir.1952) was an income tax case decided by Judge Augustus Noble Hand. On December 10, 1943, a thyroidectomy was performed on petitioner's wife. A histological examination disclosed a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid with multiple lymph node metastases, according to the su ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Oregon Medicaid health experiment

    • The Oregon health insurance experiment (sometimes abbreviated OHIE) was a research study looking at the effects of the 2008 Medicaid expansion in the U.S. state of Oregon, which occurred based on lottery drawings from a waiting list and thus offered an opportunity to conduct a randomized experiment by comparing a contr ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Orphan drug

    • An orphan drug is a pharmaceutical agent that has been developed specifically to treat a rare medical condition, the condition itself being referred to as an orphan disease. In the US and EU it is easier to gain marketing approval for an orphan drug, and there may be other financial incentives, such as extended exclus ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pay for performance (healthcare)

    • In the healthcare industry, pay for performance (P4P), also known as "value-based purchasing", is a payment model that offers financial incentives to physicians, hospitals, medical groups, and other healthcare providers for meeting certain performance measures. Clinical outcomes, such as longer survival, are difficult ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Perspective (pharmacoeconomic)

    • Perspective in pharmacoeconomics refers to the economic vantage point of a pharmacoeconomic analysis, such as a cost-effectiveness analysis or cost-utility analysis. This affects the types of costs (resource expenditures) and benefits that are relevant to the analysis. Five general perspectives are often cited in phar ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pharmacoeconomics

    • Pharmacoeconomics refers to the scientific discipline that compares the value of one pharmaceutical drug or drug therapy to another. It is a sub-discipline of health economics. A pharmacoeconomic study evaluates the cost (expressed in monetary terms) and effects (expressed in terms of monetary value, efficacy or enhanc ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Physician supply

    • Physician supply refers to the number of trained physicians working in a health care system or active in the labour market. The supply depends primarily on the number of graduates of medical schools in a country or jurisdiction, but also on the number who continue to practice medicine as a career path and who remain in ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • PMPM

    • Capitation is a payment arrangement for health care service providers such as physicians or nurse practitioners. It pays a physician or group of physicians a set amount for each enrolled person assigned to them, per period of time, whether or not that person seeks care. These providers generally are contracted with a t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Health policy

    • Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a society. According to the World Health Organization, an explicit health policy can achieve several things: it defines a vision for the future; it outlines priorities and the expected rol ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Population health

    • 'Population health has been defined as"the health outcomes of a group of individuals, including the distribution of such outcomes within the group". It is an approach to health that aims to improve the health of an entire human population. This concept does not refer to animal or plant populations. It has been describe ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Population health policies and interventions

    • Population health, a field which focuses on the improvement of the health outcomes for a group of individuals, has been described as consisting of three components: "health outcomes, patterns of health determinants, and policies and interventions". Policies and Interventions define the methods in which health outcomes ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Practice-based commissioning

    • Practice-Based Commissioning (PBC) was a United Kingdom Department of Health initiative introduced in 2005 to improve primary care services by enabling healthcare professionals to decide how services are funded to meet the needs of the local population. PBC was designed to give healthcare staff, usually general medical ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Private healthcare

    • Private healthcare or private medicine is healthcare and medicine provided by entities other than the government. The term is generally used more in Europe and other countries which have publicly funded health care, to differentiate the arrangement from systems where private healthcare is the norm. Ethical issues rela ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Public health

    • Public health refers to "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals." It is concerned with threats to health based on population health analysis. The popul ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Quality-adjusted life year

    • The quality-adjusted life year or quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) is a generic measure of disease burden, including both the quality and the quantity of life lived. It is used in economic evaluation to assess the value for money of medical interventions. One QALY equates to one year in perfect health. If an individua ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Rajiv Gandhi Jeevandayee Arogya Yojana

    • Rajiv Gandhi Jeevandayee Arogya Yojana

      Rajiv Gandhi Jeevandayee Arogya Yojana (RGJAY) is a Universal health care scheme run by the Government of Maharashtra for the poor people of the state of Maharashtra who holds one of the 4 cards issued by the government; Antyodaya card, Annapurna card, yellow ration card or orange ration card. The scheme was first laun ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • RAND Health Insurance Experiment

    • The RAND Health Insurance Experiment (RAND HIE) was an experimental study of health care costs, utilization and outcomes in the United States, which assigned people randomly to different kinds of plans and followed their behavior, from 1974 to 1982. Because it was a randomized controlled trial, it provided stronger evi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Risk equalization

    • Risk equalization is a way of equalizing the risk profiles of insurance members to avoid loading premiums on the insured to some predetermined extent. In health insurance, it enables private health insurance to operate in some countries to be offered at a common rate for all even though insurers are not allowed by law ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Roemer's law


    • Single-payer healthcare

    • Single-payer healthcare is a system in which the state, rather than private insurers, pays for all healthcare costs. Single-payer systems may contract for healthcare services from private organizations (as is the case in Canada) or may own and employ healthcare resources and personnel (as is the case in the United King ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Social determinants of health in poverty

    • The social determinants of health in poverty describe the factors that affect impoverished populations' health and health inequality. Inequalities in health stem from the conditions of people's lives, including living conditions, work environment, age, and other social factors, and how these affect people's ability to ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Socialized medicine

    • Socialized medicine is a term used to describe and discuss systems of universal health care: medical and hospital care for all at a nominal cost by means of government regulation of health care and subsidies derived from taxation. Because of historically negative associations with socialism in American culture, the ter ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Special needs plan

    • A special needs plan (or SNP, often pronounced “snip”) is a category of the US Medicare Advantage plan designed to attract and enroll Medicare beneficiaries who fall into a certain special needs demographic. There are two types of SNPs. The exclusive SNP enrolls only those beneficiaries who fall into the spec ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Specialty Society Relative Value Scale Update Committee

    • The Specialty Society Relative Value Scale Update Committee or Relative Value Update Committee (RUC, pronounced "ruck") is a private group of 31 mostly specialist physicians who have made highly influential recommendations on how to value a physician's work when computing health care prices in the United States' public ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Sullivan's Index


    • Supplier-induced demand

    • In economics, supplier induced demand (SID) may occur when asymmetry of information exists between supplier and consumer. The supplier can use superior information to encourage an individual to demand a greater quantity of the good or service they supply than the Pareto efficient level, should asymmetric information no ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Third-party administrator

    • A third-party administrator (TPA) is an organization that processes insurance claims or certain aspects of employee benefit plans for a separate entity. This can be viewed as "outsourcing" the administration of the claims processing, since the TPA is performing a task traditionally handled by the company providing the ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • James Thornton (health economist)

    • James Arthur Thornton (born 1955) is Professor of Economics at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate classes. His research focuses on microeconomics, econometrics, and health economics. He received his B.A. from in 1978, his M.A from in 1980, both from Marquette ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Time-trade-off

    • Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as: Imagine that you are told that you have 10 years left to live. In connection with this you are also told that you can choose to live th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Treatment IND

    • Treatment IND or treatment investigational new drugs, is a United States regulation (made by the federal register, May 22, 1987) used to make promising new drugs available to the desperately ill patients as early in the drug development process as possible. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) permits investigat ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Universal health care

    • Universal health care, sometimes referred to as universal health coverage, universal coverage, or universal care, usually refers to a health care system which provides health care and financial protection to all citizens of a particular country. It is organized around providing a specified package of benefits to all me ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Unnecessary health care

    • Unnecessary health care (overutilization, overuse, or overtreatment) is healthcare provided with a higher volume or cost than is appropriate. In the United States, where health care costs are the highest as a percentage of GDP, overuse is the predominant factor in its expense, accounting for about a third of healthcare ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • URAC

    • URAC

      URAC is a non-profit organization that helps promote health care quality through the accreditation of organizations involved in medical care services. URAC accreditation is given to an organization for a period of up to three years. An organization must go through a review again after this period expires in order to m ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Utilization management

    • Utilization management (UM) is defined by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Utilization Management by Third Parties (1989) as "a set of techniques used by or on behalf of purchasers of health care benefits to manage health care costs by influencing patient care decision-making through case-by-case assessment ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ralph Weber (businessman)

    • Ralph Weber (businessman)

      Ralph F. Weber (born October 26, 1961) is a Canadian philanthropic entrepreneur, writer, Accredited Estate Planner, Certified Financial Planner, Registered Employee Benefits Consultant, Chartered Life Underwriter, and Chartered Financial Consultant residing in the United States who participated in a health care forum w ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Welfare, Choice and Solidarity in Transition

    • Welfare, Choice and Solidarity in Transition: reforming the health sector in Eastern Europe was written by János Kornai and Karen Eggleston, published in 2001. This book focused on ten post-socialist Eastern European countries, including Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Republic of Macedonia, Po ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    Wikipedia
  • What Else?

    • Health economics

Extras