Main

  • Genealogy

    Genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogy

    • Academic genealogies

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Academic genealogies


      Wikipedia
    • American genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about American genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Ancestries of individuals

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ancestries of individuals


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogy and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogy and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints


      Wikipedia
    • Family associations

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Family associations


      Wikipedia
    • Family coats of arms

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Family coats of arms


      Wikipedia
    • Family history

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Family history


      Wikipedia
    • Family registers

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Family registers


      Wikipedia
    • Family trees

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Family trees


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogical fraud

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogical fraud


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogical societies

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogical societies


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogies of individuals

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogies of individuals


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogists

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogists


      Wikipedia
    • Genetic genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genetic genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Given names

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Given names


      Wikipedia
    • Indian genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Indian genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Irish genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Irish genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Jewish genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Jewish genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Korean genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Korean genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogical libraries

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogical libraries


      Wikipedia
    • Medieval genealogies and succession lists

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Medieval genealogies and succession lists


      Wikipedia
    • Nigerian genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Nigerian genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Political families by country

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Political families by country


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogy publications

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogy publications


      Wikipedia
    • Serbian genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Serbian genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogy software

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogy software


      Wikipedia
    • Sri Lankan genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Sri Lankan genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Surname

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Surname


      Wikipedia
    • Syrian genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Syrian genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Ukrainian genealogy

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Ukrainian genealogy


      Wikipedia
    • Vital statistics

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Vital statistics


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogy websites

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Genealogy websites


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogy

    • Genealogy (from Greek: γενεά genea, "generation"; and λόγος logos, "knowledge"), also known as family history, is the study of families and the tracing of their lineages and history. Genealogists use oral interviews, historical records, genetic analysis, and other records to obtain informa ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Academic genealogy

    • An academic, or scientific, genealogy, organizes a family tree of scientists and scholars according to mentoring relationships, often in the form of dissertation supervision or postdoc supervision relationships. The academic lineage or academic ancestry of someone is a chain of professors who have served as academic m ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ahnentafel

    • An ahnentafel (German for "ancestor table"; German: [ˈʔaːnənˌtaːfəl]) or ahnenreihe ("ancestor series"; German: [ˈʔaːnənˌʁaɪə]) is a genealogical numbering system for listing a person's direct ancestors in a fixed sequence of ascent. The subject (proband or progenitor) of th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ancient planter

    • "Ancient planter" was a term applied to early colonists who migrated to the Colony of Virginia in what is now the United States, when the colony was managed by the Virginia Company of London. They received land grants if they stayed in the colony for at least three years. Under the terms of the "Instructions to Governo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Antecedent (genealogy)

    • In genealogy and in phylogenetic studies of evolutionary biology, antecedents or antecessors are predecessors in a family line. For example, one is the descendant of their grandparents, who are one's antecedents. This term has particular utility in evolutionary coalescent theory, which models the process of genetic dri ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Aois-dàna


    • Armenian name

    • An Armenian name comprises a given name and a surname. According to Armenia's National Statistical Service, the most commonly used names for newborn boys in Armenia, as of early 2012[update], were Davit, , Gor, Hayk, Alex, Erik, Arman, Samvel, Tigran, and Aram. For girls, the most popular names were Nare, Milena, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Aunt

    • An aunt is a person who is the sister, half-sister, step-sister, or sister-in-law of a parent, but can also be an affectionate title for an older nurturing lady. Aunts are second-degree relatives and share 25% genetic overlap when they are the full sister of the parent. A half-aunt is a half-sister of one's parent and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Birth certificate

    • A birth certificate is a vital record that documents the birth of a child. The term "birth certificate" can refer to either the original document certifying the circumstances of the birth or to a certified copy of or representation of the ensuing registration of that birth. Depending on the jurisdiction, a record of bi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Birth registration in Ancient Rome

    • Birth certificates for Roman citizens were introduced during the reign of Augustus (27 BC–14 AD). Until the time of Alexander Severus (222–235 AD), it was required that these documents be written in Latin as a marker of "Romanness" (Romanitas). There are 21 extant birth registration documents of Roman citize ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Brother

    • A brother is a male sibling. The term brother comes from the Proto-Indo-European *bÊ°réh₂tēr, which becomes Latin frater, of the same meaning. Sibling warmth, or sibling affect between male siblings has been correlated to some more negative effects. In pairs of brothers higher sibling warmth is relate ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Bure kinship

    • The Bure kinship (Swedish: Bureätten) is a Scandinavian kinship, centered in the SkellefteÃ¥ area, today's BureÃ¥ in Northern Sweden. The claims about the kinship are based on a Bure family genealogy written in the beginning of the 17th century by Johannes Bureus, in his manuscript Om Bura namn och ätt. In h ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Burke's Landed Gentry


    • Cadet (genealogy)

    • In genealogy, a cadet is a younger son, as opposed to the firstborn heir. Compare puisne. The word is recorded in English since 1634, originally for a young son, identical to the French, which is itself derived from the Gascon Occitan (spoken in Gascony in southwest France) capdet "captain, chief", in turn from the La ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • California Birth Index

    • The California Birth Index (CABI) is a database compiled by the California Office of Health Information and Research. The index contains birth records of all registered births in California between 1905 and 1995. Each record is an abstract of a person's birth certificate, including date of birth, full name, county of b ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Canada 1916 Census

    • In 1916 the government of Canada conducted the second of a series of special censuses covering the rapidly expanding Northwest Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. These censuses were conducted every ten years from 1906 to 1946. This census was conducted as at June 1, 1916. It was the ninth census for Man ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Canada 1926 Census

    • In 1926 the government of Canada conducted the third of a series of special censuses covering the rapidly expanding Northwest Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. These censuses were conducted every ten years from 1906 to 1946. This census was conducted as at June 1, 1926. The entire population of Canada ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Canada 1936 Census

    • In 1936 the government of Canada conducted the fourth of a series of special censuses covering the rapidly expanding Northwest Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. These censuses were conducted every ten years from 1906 to 1946. This census was conducted as at June 1, 1936. The entire population of Canada ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Canada 1946 Census

    • In 1946 the government of Canada conducted the fifth of a series of special censuses covering the rapidly expanding Northwest Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. These censuses were conducted every ten years from 1906 to 1946. This census was conducted as at June 1, 1946. The entire population of Canada ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cause of death

    • In law, medicine, and statistics, cause of death is a term which refers to an official determination of conditions resulting in a human's death. In modern times, such determinations usually become an essential data point of an official death certificate. In contemporary times and in most parts of the world, a caus ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Census

    • A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. It is a regularly occurring and official count of a particular population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agricultu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Census Enumerators' Books


    • Descent from Charlemagne

    • External video

      Charlemagne (/ˈʃɑːrláµ»meɪn/) or Charles the Great (2 April 742 – 28 January 814), numbered Charles I, was King of the Franks from 768, King of the Lombards from 774 and Emperor of the Romans from 800. He united much of Europe during the early Middle Ages. He was the first recognised emperor in w ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Circa

    • Circa (from Latin, meaning "around, about"), usually abbreviated c., ca or ca. (also circ. or cca.), means "approximately" in several European languages including English, usually in reference to a date.Circa is widely used in genealogy and historical writing when the dates of events are not accurately known. When used ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Civil registration

    • Civil registration is the system by which a government records the vital events (births, marriages, and deaths) of its citizens and residents. The resulting repository or database has different names in different countries and even in different US states. It can be called a civil registry ,civil register (but this is a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cluster genealogy

    • Cluster genealogy is a research technique employed by genealogists to learn more about an ancestor by examining records left by the ancestor's cluster. A person's cluster consists of the extended family, friends, neighbors, and other associates such as business partners. Researching the lives of an ancestor's cluster l ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Coefficient of relationship

    • The coefficient of relationship is a measure of the degree of consanguinity (or biological relationship) between two individuals. A coefficient of inbreeding can be calculated for an individual, as a measure for the amount of pedigree collapse within that individual's genealogy. The term coefficient of relationship was ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica

    • Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica is an eight volume work on genealogy by Sir Frederic Madden (1801-1873), Rev.Bulkeley Bandinel (1781-1861) and John Gough Nichols (1806–1873), published quarterly from 1834. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Consanguine marriage

    • Consanguineous marriage is matrimony between individuals who are closely related. Though it may involve incest, it implies more than the sexual nature of incest. In a clinical sense, marriage between two family members who are second cousins or closer qualify as having a consanguineous marriage. This is based on the ge ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Consanguinity

    • Consanguinity ("blood relation", from the Latin ) is the property of being from the same kinship as another person. In that aspect, consanguinity is the quality of being descended from the same ancestor as another person. The laws of many jurisdictions set out degrees of consanguinity in relation to prohibited sexual r ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cousin

    • A cousin is a relative with whom a person shares one or more common ancestors. In the general sense, cousins are two or more generations away from any common ancestor, thus distinguishing a cousin from an ancestor, descendant, sibling, aunt, uncle, niece, or nephew. However, in common parlance, "cousins" typically refe ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Daitch–Mokotoff Soundex


    • Death certificate

    • The phrase death certificate can refer either to a document issued by a medical practitioner certifying the deceased state of a person or, popularly, to a document issued by a person such as a registrar of vital statistics that declares the date, location and cause of a person's death as later entered in an official re ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Death Master File

    • The Death Master File (DMF) is a computer database file made available by the United States Social Security Administration since 1980. It is known commercially as the Social Security Death Index (SSDI). The file contains information about persons who had Social Security numbers and whose deaths were reported to the Soc ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Debrett's


    • Descent from antiquity

    • Descent from antiquity (DFA) is the project of establishing a well-researched, generation-by-generation descent of living persons from people living in antiquity. It is an ultimate challenge in prosopography and genealogy. The idea of descent from antiquity is by no means new to genealogists. Hellenistic dynasties ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Digital Archives

    • Digital Archives (Norwegian: Digitalarkivet) is a website of the National Archival Services of Norway for publishing digitized archival material. The website contains sources that are both and transcribed (searchable) and scanned. The most important searchable sources are the nationwide censuses of 1801, 1865, 1900, an ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dominickers

    • The Dominickers are a small biracial or triracial ethnic group that was once centered in the Florida Panhandle county of Holmes, in a corner of the southern part of the county west of the Choctawhatchee River, near the town of Ponce de Leon. The group was classified in 1950 as one of the "reputed Indian-White-Negro rac ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Europäische Stammtafeln


    • Surnames by country

    • Surname conventions and laws vary around the world. This article gives an overview of surnames around the world. In Argentina, normally only one family name, the father's paternal family name, is used and registered, as in English-speaking countries. However, it is possible to use both the paternal and maternal name. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Family register

    • A family register (also known in several variations, such as household register and family album, and, when discussing non-anglophone countries, the native-language names of the registers such as Familienbuch in Germany, hukou in mainland China and koseki in Japan) is a civil registry used in many countries to track in ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Family tree

    • A family tree, or pedigree chart, is a chart representing family relationships in a conventional tree structure. The more detailed family trees used in medicine and social work are known as genograms. Genealogical data can be represented in several formats, for example as a pedigree or ancestry chart. Family trees ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Fantasy genealogy

    • Fantasy genealogies are mythical, fictional or fabricated pedigrees, usually to enhance the status of the descendant. Many claimed ancestries are considered by modern scholars to be fabrications, especially the claims of kings and emperors who trace their ancestry to gods or the founders of their civilization. Such pe ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists

    • Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists (FASG) is an independent society of fellows reflecting the master class of genealogists within the United States of America. There are only fifty (50) lifetime FASG members within the American Society of Genealogists (ASG). Fellows have the post-nominal initials FASG foll ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogiae scriptoris Fusniacensis

    • The Genealogiae scriptoris Fusniacensis is a collection of genealogies of the Capetian dynasty from 866, especially useful for the light it sheds on the noble families of Lotharingia. It was written at the Abbey of Foigny in the diocese of Laon shortly after 1160, probably by the reigning abbot, Robert. Its twelve are ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogical certificate

    • The genealogical certificate (Abstammungsurkunde) was a civil status certificate under German law to prove the birth of a child and it differs slightly from a birth certificate. The main purpose of the genealogical certificate was to determine marriage bans with adopted children. Since this had little practical signif ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogical Claims of Jaffna

    • The researcher into genealogy in Sri Lanka, (as in the rest of the Indian subcontinent) faces a significant problem due to the lack of reliable source material. Unlike in the west, where there has been a long tradition of documenting genealogical data (i.e.: births, marriages and deaths) from very early times, in Sri L ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogical numbering systems

    • Several genealogical numbering systems have been widely adopted for presenting family trees and pedigree charts in text format. Among the most popular numbering systems are: Ahnentafel (Sosa-Stradonitz Method), and the Register, NGSQ, Henry, d'Aboville, Meurgey de Tupigny, and de Villiers/Pama Systems. Ahnentafel, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogical Proof Standard

    • The Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) is a guideline for establishing the reliability ("proof") of a genealogical conclusion with reasonable certainty. It is important within the genealogical community for clearly communicating the quality of research performed, such as by a professional genealogist. It is also useful ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • The Genealogist

    • The Genealogist is a bi-annual genealogical magazine founded in 1980 by the American Society of Genealogists (ASG) and by Dr. Neil D. Thompson, FASG. Articles are published in full detail, including references. The magazine allows shorter articles, but focuses on articles that are often too large or complex for other g ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogy of the Arsacids

    • The solid lines show father-to-son lineage and dashed lines indicate a questionable blood relationship or adopted brothers. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogy Society of Norway

    • The Genealogy Society of Norway (Norwegian: Slekt og Data, formerly DIS-Norge and DIS-Norge, Slekt og Data) was established on January 12, 1990 and is Norway's largest genealogical organization. The organization's purpose is to create on-line and local meetings for anyone interested in genealogy and personal history, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • General Register Office for England and Wales

    • The General Register Office for England and Wales (GRO) is the section of the United Kingdom HM Passport Office responsible for the civil registration of births (including stillbirths), adoptions, marriages, civil partnerships and deaths in England and Wales and for those same events outside the UK if they involve a UK ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • General Register Office for Scotland

    • The General Register Office for Scotland (GROS) (Scottish Gaelic: Oifis Choitcheann a' Chlàraidh na h-Alba) was a non-ministerial directorate of the Scottish Government that administered the registration of births, deaths, marriages, divorces and adoptions in Scotland. It was also responsible for the statutes relati ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Gopalraj Vansawali

    • Gopalraj Vansawali is a genealogical record of Nepalese monarchs. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Great Migration Study Project

    • The Great Migration Study Project is an ongoing scholarly endeavor to catalogue all emigrants to colonial New England between 1620 and 1640 (the Puritan great migration). Directed by Robert Charles Anderson, it is done in collaboration with the New England Historic Genealogical Society. The project's first series, cov ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Haplogroup D1 (Y-DNA)

    • Haplogroup D1 (Y-DNA) may refer to the following subclades of Y-DNA Haplogroup D: International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG), Y-DNA Haplogroup D and its Subclades - 2015 . ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Heraldic visitation

    • Heraldic visitations were tours of inspection undertaken by Kings of Arms (and more often by junior officers of arms (or Heralds) as deputies) throughout England, Wales and Ireland. Their purpose was to regulate and register the coats of arms of nobility and gentry and boroughs, and to record pedigrees. They took place ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Eleanor Silliman Belknap Humphrey

    • Eleanor Silliman Belknap Humphrey

      Eleanor Silliman Belknap Humphrey (1876–1964) was an American artist, genealogist, writer, socialite, and philanthropist born in Louisville, Kentucky. She was the daughter of William Richardson Belknap, president of Louisville's Belknap Hardware and Manufacturing Company, and his first wife Alice Trumbull Silliman ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Identical ancestors point

    • In genetic genealogy, the identical ancestors point (IAP) is that last point in a given population's past where each individual then alive turned out to be either the ancestor of every individual alive now or to have no currently living descendants. This point lies further in the past than the population's most recent ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • International Congress of Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences

    • The International Congress of Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences is a biennial conference discussing topics of heraldic and genealogical interest. The Congress brings together scholars and other interested persons from all the nations of Europe and from many countries around the world. The first Congress was held in Ba ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • International Society of Genetic Genealogy

    • International Society of
      Genetic Genealogy

      The International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG) is an independent non-commercial nonprofit organization of genetic genealogists run by volunteers. It was founded by a group of surname DNA project administrators in 2005 to promote DNA testing for genealogy. It advocates the use of genetics in genealogical researc ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • International Tracing Service

    • The International Tracing Service (ITS), in German Internationaler Suchdienst, in French Service International de Recherches in Bad Arolsen, Germany, is an internationally governed centre for documentation, information and research on Nazi persecution, forced labour and the Holocaust in Nazi Germany and its occupied re ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Jane Austen's family and ancestry


    • Jure matris

    • Jure matris (iure matris) is a Latin phrase meaning "by right of his mother" or "in right of his mother". It is commonly encountered in the law of Inheritance when a noble title or other right passes from mother to son. It is also used in the context of monarchy in cases where a woman holds a title in her own right bu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Jure uxoris

    • Jure uxoris is a Latin term that means "by right of (his) wife".Jure is the ablative case of jus, meaning a legal right. It is most commonly used to refer to a title of nobility held by a man because his wife holds it suo jure ("in her own right"). Similarly, the husband of an heiress could become the legal possessor o ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Langfeðgatal


    • Lizzie Lape

    • Lizzie Lape (August 15, 1853 – sometime after Thanksgiving 1917) was a mid-Ohio madam who owned and operated multiple bordellos at the end of the 19th century and early into the 20th. Lizzie Lape was born Amy Elizabeth Rogers in Whitley County, Kentucky before the Civil War. She was the daughter of Prior and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lignages d'Outremer


    • List of United Kingdom censuses

    • The census in the United Kingdom is decennial, that is, held every ten years, although there is provision in the Census Act 1920 for a census to take place at intervals of five years or more. There have only been two occasions where the census has not been decennial: There was no census in 1941 due to the war; and a mi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Maithili Karna Kayasthak Panjik Sarvekshan

    • Maithil Karna Kayasthak Panjik Sarvekshan

      Maithil Karna Kayasthak Panjik Sarvekshan (A Survey of the Panji of the Karan Kayasthas of Mithila) is a book written by Binod Bihari Verma in Maithili. It is a research study on the available ancient manuscripts in the Mithila region, called as Panjis, which are genealogical charts of Maithil Brahmin and Kayasthas cas ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Manba Al-Ansab

    • The Source of Genealogy or Manba Al-Ansāb (Arabic: منبع الانساب | Persian: منبع انساب) is a historical document outlining various topics including the genealogy of the Sayyids of Bukkur (Urdu بھاکر ی سادات) Bhakri syed and S ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Boyd's Marriage Index


    • Pallot's Marriage Index


    • Marriage license

    • A marriage license is a document issued, either by a church or state authority, authorizing a couple to marry. The procedure for obtaining a license varies between countries and has changed over time. Marriage licenses began to be issued in the Middle Ages, to permit a marriage which would otherwise be illegal (for ins ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:1

    • Matthew 1:1 is the opening verse of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. Since Matthew is traditionally placed as the first of the four Gospels, this verse commonly serves as the opening to the entire New Testament. The original Koine Greek, according to Westcott and Hort, reads: In the King James Version of t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:2

    • Matthew 1:2 is the second verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is the first part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, is listed. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:3

    • Matthew 1:3 is the third verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, is listed. The original Koine Greek, according to Westcott and Hort, reads: In the King James Version of the Bible the text read ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:4

    • Matthew 1:4 is the fourth verse of the Matthew 1 of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, is listed. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a collect ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:5

    • Matthew 1:5 is the fifth verse of the Matthew 1 of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, is listed. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: This genea ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:8

    • Matthew 1:8 is the eighth verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, is listed. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a col ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:9

    • Matthew 1:9 is the ninth verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the Bible. The verse is part of the non-synoptic section where the genealogy of Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, is listed, or on non-Pauline interpretations the genealogy of Jesus. The purpose of the genealogy is to show descent from the ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:10

    • Matthew 1:10 is the tenth verse of Matthew 1 of the Gospel of Matthew in the Bible. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the father of Jesus, is listed. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a collection of other versi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:11

    • Matthew 1:11 is the eleventh verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the father of Jesus, is listed. It is the last verse of the middle third of the listing. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The Wor ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:12

    • Matthew 1:12 is the twelfth verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the betrothed of Mary, the mother of Jesus Christ, is listed. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:13

    • Matthew 1:13 is the thirteenth verse of Matthew 1 of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the father of Jesus, is listed. This verse covers the section somewhat after the Babylonian Captivity six generation before Jesus. In the King James Version o ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:14

    • Matthew 1:14 is the fourteenth verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the father of Jesus, is listed. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a coll ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:15

    • Matthew 1:15 is the fifteenth verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is part of the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the father of Jesus, is listed. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a colle ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Matthew 1:16

    • Matthew 1:16 is the sixteenth verse of Matthew 1 of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is the final part of the section that traces the genealogy of Joseph, the father of Jesus down from Abraham. See also: Genealogy of Jesus In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English B ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • McAllen (surname)

    • McAllen is an Irish Gaelic surname, originating from "MacAllen" in Scotland. Historically, the name has migrated to Ireland, where the prefix of the name has been commonly transposed with "Mc". The first recorded arrivals to Ireland bearing this name came in the 15th century to County Donegal, with the arrival of Gallo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Monumental inscription

    • A monumental inscription is an inscription, typically carved in stone, on a grave marker, cenotaph, memorial plaque, church monument or other memorial. The purpose of monumental inscriptions is to serve as memorials to the dead. Those on gravestones are normally placed there by members of the deceased's family. Those ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Most recent common ancestor

    • In biology and genealogy, the most recent common ancestor (MRCA, also last common ancestor LCA, or concestor) of any set of organisms is the most recent individual from which all organisms in a group are directly descended. The term is also used reference to the ancestry of groups of genes (haplotypes) rather than orga ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mug book

    • A mug book is a collection of photographs of criminals, typically in mug shots taken at the time of an arrest. A mug book is used by an eyewitness to a crime, with the assistance of law enforcement, in an effort to identify the perpetrator. Research has shown that grouped photos result in less false-positives than indi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National Hall of Records

    • The National Hall of Records is an obituary service that was introduced at the National Funeral Directors Association annual convention in Las Vegas in October 2007. The National Hall of Records has over 300 contributing Funeral home members. Family members searching for their ancestors or other individuals can search ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • National Records of Scotland

    • National Records of Scotland

      National Records of Scotland is a non-ministerial department of the Scottish Government. It is responsible for civil registration, the census in Scotland, demography and statistics, family history and the national archives and historical records. National Records of Scotland was formed from the merger of the General R ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Nomen nescio

    • Nomen nescio (/ˈnoː.men ˈnes.ki.oː/), IPA pronounced [ˈnoː.mɛ̃ nɛsˈkɪ.oː] abbreviated to N.N., is used to signify an anonymous or unnamed person. From Latin nomen, name, and nescio, I do not know (from nescire, not to know), it literally means, I do not know the name. One use for ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Non-paternity event

    • In genetic genealogy and clinical genetics, a non-paternity event is when someone who is presumed to be an individual's father is not in fact the biological father. This presumption may be on the part of the individual, the parents, or the physician. Non-paternity may result from sperm donation, undisclosed adoption, i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Nonconformist register

    • A Nonconformist register is broadly similar to a parish register, but deriving from a nonconformist church or chapel. Nonconformist churches are protestant churches which do not conform to the doctrines of the established Church of England. Examples include the Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian churches and the Quakers ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Offspring

    • In biology, offspring are the young born of living organisms, produced either by a single organism or, in the case of sexual reproduction, two organisms. Collective offspring may be known as a brood or progeny in a more general way. This can refer to a set of simultaneous offspring, such as the chicks hatched from one ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • One-name study

    • A one-name study is a project researching a specific surname, as opposed to a particular pedigree (ancestors of one person) or descendancy (descendants of one person or couple). Some people who research a specific surname may restrict their research geographically and chronologically, perhaps to one country and time pe ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • One-place study

    • One-place studies are a branch of family history and/or local history with a focus on the entire population of a single road, village or community, not just a single, geographically dispersed family line. In the course of a one-place study, a prime objective is to transcribe the registers of christenings, marriage ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • OpenSNP

    • Released in September 2011, openSNP is an open source website where users can share their genetic information. Users upload their genes, including gender, age, eye color, medical history, Fitbit data. With a focus on user patient-led research (PLR), there is potential to redefine the way health research is conducted. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Orphan Train

    • The Orphan Train Movement was a supervised welfare program that transported orphaned and homeless children from crowded Eastern cities of the United States to foster homes located largely in rural areas of the Midwest. The orphan trains operated between 1854 and 1929, relocating about 200,000 orphaned, abandoned, or ho ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Painted photography backdrops

    • From roughly 1860 to 1920painted photography backdrops were a standard feature of early photography studios. Generally of rustic or quasi-classical design, but sometimes presenting a bourgeoisie trompe-l'œil, they eventually fell out of fashion with the advent of the Brownie and Kodak cameras which brought photograp ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Parish register

    • A parish register in an ecclesiastical parish is a handwritten volume, normally kept in the parish church in which certain details of religious ceremonies marking major events such as baptisms (together with the dates and names of the parents), marriages (with the names of the partners), children, and burials (that had ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pedigree collapse

    • In genealogy, pedigree collapse describes how reproduction between two individuals who share an ancestor causes the number of distinct ancestors in the family tree of their offspring to be smaller than it could otherwise be. Robert C. Gunderson coined the term, which is also known by the German term Ahnenschwund (loose ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pennsylvania Federation of Historical Societies

    • The Pennsylvania Federation of Historical Societies was founded in 1905 as an umbrella organization for local historical and genealogical societies in Pennsylvania. Its founding members included: Later members included: ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • PhDTree

    • The PhDTree is a web-based database for the academic genealogy of scholars and researchers. As of August, 2015, the database contained information on over 3,500,000 scholars and researchers from more than 60 countries. For a typical scholar, the project entry includes graduation year, alma mater, doctoral advisor, doct ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Population and housing censuses by country

    • This is a list of national population and housing censuses. UN recommends a census enumeration atleast once every ten years, and once every 5 for even better data, rather than simply relying on estimates and projections alone. However, a number of nations have not carried them out once a decade. Lebanon has comple ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Progenitor

    • A progenitor is a person or thing from which others are descended or originate. For example, it is used to refer to the ancestor who started the line of a noble family. In a wider sense today it is used to refer to the person who originates a movement or way of life. The progenitor (German: Stammvater or Ahnherr) ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Scotland) Act 1965

    • Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Scotland) Act 1965

      The Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Scotland) Act 1965, was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which amended the existing legislation controlling the registration system of births, deaths and marriages in Scotland founded in 1855. The Act set out the roles, responsibilities and functions of t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Residential Genealogy

    • Residential genealogy is The linking of people and places throughout history. Residential Genealogy has two main facets: • Discovering the genealogy of a particular home, building, or land through history. Identifying the owners of a house throughout its lifetime is a good example of a singular vertical historic ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of Edmund Rice (colonist) descendants

    • This is a category of descendants of Edmund Rice who immigrated to Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1638 with his kin and became a founder of both Sudbury, Massachusetts and Marlborough, Massachusetts. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Royal descent

    • A royal descent is a person descended from a past or present monarch. Both geneticists and genealogists have attempted to estimate the percentage of living people with royal descent. From a genetical perspective, the number of unprovable descendants must be virtually unlimited if going back enough generations, accordi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Rule of 1/1000 common ancestry


    • Scam genealogical book

    • The popularity of genealogy, encouraged by the increasing use of the Internet is encouraging a number of people to mass-market what authorities regard as scam "genealogical books" which are sometimes promoted by affiliated websites. They tend to contain a general introduction, a section about the origin of surnames in ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Sibling-in-law

    • David and Jonathan, sworn friends and confidants, became brothers-in-law when David married Jonathan's sister Michal. One's sibling-in-law is the one's spouse's sibling, one's sibling's spouse, or one's spouse's sibling's spouse. By gender, this is specified as brother-in-law for one's spouse's brother, one's sibling' ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Silla monarchs family tree

    • Silla (57 BC – 935 CE) was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. In the early years, Silla was ruled by the Pak, Seok, and Kim families. Rulers of Silla had various titles, including Isageum, Maripgan, and Daewang. Like some Baekje kings, some declared themselves emperor. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Sister

    • A sister is the female sibling. The term sister comes from Old Norse systir which itself derives from Proto-Germanic *swestēr, both of whom have the same meaning, i.e. sister. Some studies have found that sisters display more traits indicating jealousy around their siblings than their male counterparts, brother ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Social Security Death Index

    • The Social Security Death Index (SSDI) is a database of death records created from the United States Social Security Administration's Death Master File Extract. Most persons who have died since 1936 who had a Social Security Number (SSN) and whose death has been reported to the Social Security Administration are listed ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogy software

    • Genealogy software is computer software used to record, organize, and publish genealogical data. At a minimum, genealogy software collects the date and place of an individual's birth, marriage, and death, and stores the relationships of individuals to their parents, spouses, and children. Some programs are more fl ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Springer Hoax

    • The Springer Hoax was a scam starting in the mid 19th century, often using a phony genealogy in various ways to collect money based on the supposed estate of prominent colonialist Charles (Carl Christopher) Springer and debts said to be owed to him by various government agencies of Wilmington, Delaware and , Sweden. Th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Stamp Duties Act 1783

    • The Stamp Duties Act of 1783 (23 Geo.III c.67) was passed by the House of Commons of Great Britain in order to raise money to pay for the American War of Independence. Under the provisions of this Act, all baptism, marriage and burial entries in each parish register were subject to a tax of 3d (old pence). Church minis ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Stone rubbing

    • Stone rubbing is the practice of creating an image of surface features of a stone on paper. The image records features such as natural textures, inscribed patterns or lettering. By rubbing hard rendering materials over the paper, pigment is deposited over protrusions and on edges; depressions remain unpigmented since t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Surname

    • A surname or family name is a name added to a given name. In many cases, a surname is a family name and many dictionaries define "surname" as a synonym of "family name". In the Western Hemisphere, it is commonly synonymous with last name because it is usually placed at the end of a person's given name there. In most S ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Tarombo

    • Tarombo is a term for 'genealogy' in Batak culture/language. The Batak believe that they all come from the same ancestor: Siraja Batak, the Batak Patriarch. They kept the genealogy line tracing back to this ancestor. Its origins however have been clouded with legends. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genealogy tourism

    • Genealogy Tourism, sometimes called roots tourism, is a segment of the tourism market consisting of tourists who have ancestral connections to their holiday destination. These genealogy tourists travel to the land of their ancestors to reconnect with their past and "walk in the footsteps of their forefathers". Genealo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Uncle

    • Uncle (from Latin: avunculus the diminutive of avus "grandfather") is a male family relationship or kinship within an extended or immediate family. An uncle is the brother, half-brother, step-brother, or brother-in-law of one's parent. A biological uncle is a second degree male relative and shares 25% genetic overlap. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Vital record

    • Vital records are records of life events kept under governmental authority, including birth certificates, marriage licenses, and death certificates. In some jurisdictions, vital records may also include records of civil unions or domestic partnerships. In the United States, vital records are typically maintained at bo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Vital statistics (government records)

    • Vital statistics are statistics on live births, deaths, fetal deaths, marriages and divorces. The most common way of collecting information on these events is through civil registration, an administrative system used by governments to record vital events which occur in their populations (see Box 1). Efforts to improve ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Whakapapa

    • Whakapapa (Māori pronunciation: [ˈfakapapa]), or genealogy, is a fundamental principle that permeates the whole of Māori culture. However, it is more than just a genealogical 'device'. It is in fact a paradigm of cultural discourse and provides the basis for establishing, enhancing, and even challenging rel ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    Wikipedia
  • What Else?

    • Genealogy

Extras