Main

  • Educational psychology

    Educational psychology

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Educational psychology

    • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder


      Wikipedia
    • Coaching

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Coaching


      Wikipedia
    • Computer-based testing

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Computer-based testing


      Wikipedia
    • Creativity

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Creativity


      Wikipedia
    • Critical thinking

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Critical thinking


      Wikipedia
    • Educational psychologists

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Educational psychologists


      Wikipedia
    • Educational psychology books


    • Educational psychology instruments

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Educational psychology instruments


      Wikipedia
    • Educational psychology journals

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Educational psychology journals


      Wikipedia
    • Educational psychology organizations

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Educational psychology organizations


      Wikipedia
    • Educational psychology research methods

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Educational psychology research methods


      Wikipedia
    • Giftedness


    • Intelligence

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Intelligence


      Wikipedia
    • Learning disabilities

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Learning disabilities


      Wikipedia
    • Learning psychology

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Learning psychology


      Wikipedia
    • Learning theory (education)

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Learning theory (education)


      Wikipedia
    • Parent education program

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Parent education program


      Wikipedia
    • Educational practices

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Educational practices


      Wikipedia
    • Problem-based learning

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Problem-based learning


      Wikipedia
    • School and classroom behaviour

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about School and classroom behaviour


      Wikipedia
    • School counseling

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about School counseling


      Wikipedia
    • Special education

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Special education


      Wikipedia
    • Visual thinking

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Visual thinking


      Wikipedia
    • Educational psychology

    • Educational Psychology is the branch of psychology concerned with the scientific study of human learning. The study of learning processes, from both cognitive and behavioral perspectives, allows researchers to understand individual differences in intelligence, cognitive development, affect, motivation, self-regulation, ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Active learning

    • Active learning is a teaching method that strives to more directly involve students in the learning process. The term active learning "was introduced by the English scholar R W Revans (1907–2003)." Bonwell (1991) "states that in active learning, students participate in the process and students participate when th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Activity theory

    • Activity theory (AT; Russian: Теория деятельности) is an umbrella term for a line of eclectic social sciences theories and research with its roots in the Soviet psychological activity theory pioneered by Lev Vygotsky, Alexei Leont'ev and Sergei Rubinstein. These sch ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Adolescence

    • Adolescence (from Latin adolescere, meaning "to grow up") is a transitional stage of physical and psychological development that generally occurs during the period from puberty to legal adulthood (age of majority). Adolescence is usually associated with the teenage years, but its physical, psychological or cultural exp ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Adolescent egocentrism

    • Adolescent egocentrism is a term that David Elkind used to describe the phenomenon of adolescents' inability to distinguish between their perception of what others think about them and what people actually think in reality. David Elkind’s theory on adolescent egocentrism is drawn from Piaget’s theory on cogni ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Age appropriateness

    • Age appropriateness is the progression of behavioral norms largely agreed upon within a society or among sociological and psychological authorities to be appropriate to a child's development of social skills. These behaviors are divided into a number of development stages based upon the child's age. Lack of exposure t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Appreciative inquiry in education

    • 'Appreciative Inquiry' is an approach that believes, improvement is more engaging when the focus is made on the strengths rather than the weaknesses. People tend to respond to positive statements but react to negative statements that concern them. Children are more sensitive to their self-worth and thrive on what makes ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Aptitude

    • An aptitude is a component of a competence to do a certain kind of work at a certain level. Outstanding aptitude can be considered "talent". An aptitude may be physical or mental. Aptitude is inborn potential to do certain kinds of work whether developed or undeveloped. Ability is developed knowledge, understanding, le ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Artful Learning

    • Artful Learning

      Artful Learning is an educational philosophy model that is concept-based and interdisciplinary. Artful Learning was initiated by Leonard Bernstein and is rooted in using the arts to enhance all areas of education. In 1990, Leonard Bernstein received the Praemium Imperiale, an international prize awarded by the Jap ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Assessment of basic language and learning skills

    • The assessment of basic language and learning skills (ABLLS, often pronounced "ables") is an educational tool used frequently with applied behavior analysis (ABA) to measure the basic linguistic and functional skills of an individual with developmental delays or disabilities. The revised assessment of basic langua ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Association of Educational Psychologists

    • The Association of Educational Psychologists is a trade union in the United Kingdom. The British Psychological Society represented educational psychologists until 1962, when it received chartered status. Those members who wished to remain part of a body able to negotiate on their behalf formed the "Association of Educ ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

      Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a mental disorder of the neurodevelopmental type. It is characterized by problems paying attention, excessive activity, or difficulty controlling behavior which is not appropriate for a person's age. These symptoms begin by age six to twelve, are present for more than ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Auditory learning

    • Auditory learning is a learning style in which a person learns through listening. An auditory learner depends on hearing and speaking as a main way of learning. Auditory learners must be able to hear what is being said in order to understand and may have difficulty with instructions that are drawn but if the writing is ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Authentic learning

    • In education, authentic learning is an instructional approach that allows students to explore, discuss, and meaningfully construct concepts and relationships in contexts that involve real-world problems and projects that are relevant to the learner. It refers to a "wide variety of educational and instructional techniqu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Autodidacticism

    • Autodidacticism (also autodidactism) or self-education (also self-learning and self-teaching) is the education without the guidance of masters (such as teachers and professors) or institutions. Generally, an autodidact is an individual who chooses the subject they will study, their studying material and the studying rh ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Big-fish–little-pond effect


    • Bloom's taxonomy


    • Bloom's 2 Sigma Problem


    • Bracken School Readiness Assessment

    • The Bracken School Readiness Assessment ("BSRA") is an individual cognitive test designed for children, pre-K through second grade. The BSRA was developed by Bruce A. Bracken and first published in 2002 by The Psychological Corporation. Raw scores can be converted to percentile rank scores and standard scores. The pub ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • The Bully: A Discussion and Activity Story

    • The Bully: A Discussion and Activity Story

      The Bully: A Discussion and Activity Story is a 40-page children's story and activity book by Rita Y. Toews published in 2003. The story focuses on giving children a voice as to how bullying makes them feel, and educates parents on how to handle a bully situation in a positive manner. The book can be used in a classroo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Career portfolio

    • Career portfolios are used to plan, organize and document education, work samples and skills. People use career portfolios to apply to jobs, apply to college or training programs, get a higher salary, show transferable skills, and to track personal development. They are more in-depth than a resume, which is used to sum ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Challenge-based learning

    • Challenge-based learning (CBL) is a framework for learning while solving real-world Challenges. The framework is collaborative and hands-on, asking all participants (students, teachers, families, and community members) to identify Big Ideas, ask good questions, discover and solve Challenges, gain in-depth subject area ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Circle time

    • Circle time, also called group time, refers to any time that a group of people are sitting together for an activity involving everyone. The method is now in widespread use in schools across the UK and the USA. In Scotland many primary schools use the method regularly and it is starting to be introduced into secondary ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Classroom management

    • Classroom management is a term teachers use to describe the process of ensuring that classroom lessons run smoothly despite disruptive behavior by students. The term also implies the prevention of disruptive behavior. It is a difficult aspect of teaching for many teachers. Problems in this area causes some to leave tea ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Co-coaching

    • Co-coaching is a structured practice of coaching that involves peers alike with the ultimate goal to gain peer knowledge in learning how to coach or bettering their coaching techniques. This is usually done with one peer being the coach while the other peer is the coachee and vice versa during a set amount of time. Thi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Coaching

    • Coaching is a form of development in which a person called a coach supports a learner or client in achieving a specific personal or professional goal by providing training, advice and guidance. The learner is sometimes called a coachee. Occasionally, coaching may mean an informal relationship between two people, of who ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cognitive elite

    • The cognitive elite of a society, according to Richard J. Herrnstein and Charles Murray, are those having higher intelligence levels and thus better prospects for success in life. The development of a cognitive elite during the 20th century is presented in their 1994 book The Bell Curve. In this book, Herrnstein and Mu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cognitive load

    • In cognitive psychology, cognitive load refers to the total amount of mental effort being used in the working memory. Cognitive load theory was developed out of the study of problem solving by John Sweller in the late 1980s. Sweller argued that instructional design can be used to reduce cognitive load in learners. Cogn ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cognitive rigor

    • Cognitive rigor is a combined model developed by superimposing two existing models for describing rigor that are widely accepted in the education system in the United States.Cognitive Rigor is the superposition of Bloom's Taxonomy and Webb's Depth-of-Knowledge levels and is used to categorize the level of abstraction o ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cognitive strategy

    • Cognitive strategies are the specific methods that people use to solve problems, including all sorts of reasoning, planning, arithmetic, etc. Importantly, a cognitive strategy need not be all "in the head", but will almost always interact with various aspects of what might be called the "execution context". A comm ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cognitive style

    • Cognitive style or "thinking style" is a term used in cognitive psychology to describe the way individuals think, perceive and remember information. Cognitive style differs from cognitive ability (or level), the latter being measured by aptitude tests or so-called intelligence tests. There is controversy over the exact ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cognitive tutor

    • A cognitive tutor is a particular kind of intelligent tutoring system that utilizes a cognitive model to provide feedback to students as they are working through problems. This feedback will immediately inform students of the correctness, or incorrectness, of their actions in the tutor interface; however, cognitive tut ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Collaborative learning

    • Collaborative learning is a situation in which two or more people learn or attempt to learn something together. Unlike individual learning, people engaged in collaborative learning capitalize on one another's resources and skills (asking one another for information, evaluating one another's ideas, monitoring one anothe ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Communication apprehension

    • Communication apprehension is fear associated with communication with another person. According to research, 31 percent of elementary school students experience some level of communication apprehension. Communication apprehension is defined as an individual level of fear or anxiety associated with either real or a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Community of practice

    • A community of practice (CoP) is a group of people who share a craft and/or a profession. The concept was first proposed by cognitive anthropologist Jean Lave and educational theorist Etienne Wenger in their 1991 book Situated Learning (Lave & Wenger 1991). Wenger then significantly expanded on the concept in his 1998 ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Computer-supported collaborative learning

    • Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) is a pedagogical approach where in learning takes place via social interaction using a computer or through the Internet. This kind of learning is characterized by the sharing and construction of knowledge among participants using technology as their primary means of comm ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Computerized classification test

    • A computerized classification test (CCT) refers to, as its name would suggest, a test that is administered by computer for the purpose of classifying examinees. The most common CCT is a mastery test where the test classifies examinees as "Pass" or "Fail," but the term also includes tests that classify examinees into mo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Conceptual change

    • Conceptual change is the process whereby concepts and relationships between them change over the course of an individual person’s lifetime or over the course of history. Research in four different fields – cognitive psychology, cognitive developmental psychology, science education, and history and philosophy ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Conductive pedagogy

    • Conductive pedagogy is pedagogy especially useful for disabled pupils like those with cerebral palsy. The main principles are: There are brilliant people that had disabilities like the blind Homer who wrote the Iliad and the Odyssey, the deaf Beethoven who is one of the most famous and influential of all composers. an ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Confidence weighting

    • Confidence weighting (CW) is concerned with measuring two variables: (1) what a respondent believes is a correct answer to a question and (2) what degree of certainty the respondent has toward the correctness of this belief. Confidence weighting when applied to a specific answer selection for a particular test or exam ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Constructionism (learning theory)

    • Constructionist learning is when learners construct mental models to understand the world around them. Constructionism advocates student-centered, discovery learning where students use information they already know to acquire more knowledge. Students learn through participation in project-based learning where they make ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Constructive alignment

    • Constructive alignment is a principle used for devising teaching and learning activities, and assessment tasks, that directly address the intended learning outcomes (ILOs) in a way not typically achieved in traditional lectures, tutorial classes and examinations (Biggs and Tang, 2011). Constructive alignment was devise ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Constructivism (philosophy of education)

    • Constructivism is a philosophical viewpoint about the nature of knowledge. Specifically, it represents an epistemological stance. There are many "flavors" of constructivism, but one prominent theorist known for his constructivist views is Jean Piaget, who focused on how humans make meaning in relation to the interactio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Constructivist teaching methods

    • Constructivist teaching is based on constructivist learning theory. Constructivist teaching is based on the belief that learning occurs as learners are actively involved in a process of meaning and knowledge construction as opposed to passively receiving information. Learners are the makers of meaning and knowledge. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cooperative learning

    • Cooperative learning is an educational approach which aims to organize classroom activities into academic and social learning experiences. There is much more to cooperative learning than merely arranging students into groups, and it has been described as "structuring positive interdependence." Students must work in gro ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Correspondent inference theory

    • Correspondent inference theory is a psychological theory proposed by Edward E. Jones and Keith E. Davis (1965) that "systematically accounts for a perceiver's inferences about what an actor was trying to achieve by a particular action". The purpose of this theory is to explain why people make internal or external attri ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Creative pedagogy

    • Creative Pedagogy is the science and art of creative teaching. It is a sub-field of Pedagogy, opposed to Critical pedagogy (just as creative thinking for example in Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking is opposed to critical thinking). "In its essence, creative pedagogy teaches learners how to learn creatively and becom ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Creativity

    • Creativity is a phenomenon whereby something new and somehow valuable is formed. The created item may be intangible (such as an idea, a scientific theory, a musical composition, or a joke) or a physical object (such as an invention, a literary work, or a painting). Scholarly interest in creativity involves many defini ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Criterion-referenced test

    • A criterion-referenced test is a style of test which uses test scores to generate a statement about the behavior that can be expected of a person with that score. Most tests and quizzes that are written by school teachers can be considered criterion-referenced tests. In this case, the objective is simply to see whether ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Critical appraisal

    • Critical appraisal is the use of explicit, transparent methods to assess the data in published research, applying the rules of evidence to factors such as internal validity, adherence to reporting standards, conclusions and generalizability. Critical appraisal methods form a central part of the systematic review proces ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Critical thinking

    • Critical thinking was described by Richard Paul as a movement in two waves (1994). The "first wave" of critical thinking is often referred to as a 'critical analysis' that is clear, rational thinking involving critique. Its details vary amongst those who define it. According to Barry K. Beyer (1995), critical thinking ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cultural learning

    • Cultural learning, also called cultural transmission, is the way a group of people or animals within a society or culture tend to learn and pass on information. Learning styles are greatly influenced by how a culture socializes with its children and young people. Cross-cultural research in the past fifty years has prim ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cultural-historical activity theory

    • Cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) is a theoretical framework which helps to understand and analyse the relationship between the human mind (what people think and feel) and activity (what people do). It traces its origins to the founders of the cultural-historical school of Russian psychology L. S. Vygotsky and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Cultural-historical psychology

    • Cultural-historical psychology is a branch of psychological theory and practice associated with Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria and their Circle, who initiated it in the mid-1920s-1930s. The phrase "cultural-historical psychology" never occurs in the writings of Vygotsky, and was subsequently ascribed to him by his cr ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Culturally relevant teaching

    • Culturally relevant or responsive teaching is a pedagogy grounded in teachers' displaying cultural competence: skill at teaching in a cross-cultural or multicultural setting. They enable each student to relate course content to his or her cultural context. While the term culturally relevant teaching often deals specif ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Curriculum-based measurement

    • Curriculum-based measurement, or CBM, is also referred to as a general outcomes measures (GOMs) of a student's performance in either basic skills or content knowledge. CBM began in the mid 1970s with research headed by Stan Deno at the University of Minnesota. Over the course of 10 years, this work led to the esta ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Das–Naglieri cognitive assessment system


    • Defining Issues Test

    • The Defining Issues Test or the DIT is a component model of moral development devised by James Rest in 1974. The University of Minnesota formally established the Center for the Study of Ethical Development as a vehicle for research around this test in 1982. The DIT uses a Likert-type scale to give quantitative ratings ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Design-based learning

    • Design-based learning (DBL), also known as design-based instruction, is an inquiry-based form of learning, or pedagogy, that is based on integration of design thinking and the design process into the classroom at the K-12 and post-secondary levels. Design-based learning environments can be found across many disciplines ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Didaskalogenic

    • Given their inherently abstract nature, many scientific concepts, such as Newton's laws of motion, directly conflict a "working" and immediate understanding of the world. Where this is the case, such conceptual conflicts can give rise to serious obstacles to students' acceptance and understanding of scientific ideas. I ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Direct instruction

    • Direct instruction (DI) is a general term for the explicit teaching of a skill-set using lectures or demonstrations of the material to students. A particular subset of direct instruction, denoted by capitalization as Direct Instruction, refers to a specific example of the approach, that was developed by Siegfried Engel ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Discovery learning

    • Discovery learning is a technique of inquiry-based learning and is considered a constructivist based approach to education. It is supported by the work of learning theorists and psychologists Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner, and Seymour Papert. Although this form of instruction has great popularity, there is some debate in ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Distinction bias

    • Distinction bias, a concept of decision theory, is the tendency to view two options as more distinctive when evaluating them simultaneously than when evaluating them separately. One writer has presented what he called "a simplistic view" of distinction bias: "When I ask you if you would like an apple, you may say 'Yes ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Distributed scaffolding

    • Distributed scaffolding is a concept developed by Puntambekar and Kolodner (1998) that describes an ongoing system of student support through multiple tools, activities, technologies and environments that increase student learning and performance. Originally introduced by Wood, Bruner, and Ross (1976), the learning to ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Divergent question

    • A divergent question is a question with no specific answer, but rather exercises one's ability to think broadly about a certain topic. Popular in inquiry education, divergent questions allow students to explore different avenues and create many different variations and alternative answers or scenarios. Correctness may ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • The DO-IT Center

    • The DO-IT Center

      The DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center is based at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, Washington. Founded in 1992, DO-IT’s mission is to increase the successful participation of people with disabilities in postsecondary education and careers, in STEM (science, te ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Double deficit (education)

    • The double-deficit theory of dyslexia proposes that a deficit in two essential skills gives rise to the lowest level of reading performances, constituting the most severe form of dyslexia. The ability to read is believed to depend on two skills: ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dr. Fox effect

    • The Dr. Fox effect is a correlation observed between teacher expressiveness, content coverage, student evaluation and student achievement. This effect also allows insight to other related effects, such as those discussed below, and relationships between student achievement and evaluations of the teacher. The origi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dual-coding theory

    • Dual-coding theory, a theory of cognition, was hypothesized by Allan Paivio of the University of Western Ontario in 1971. In developing this theory, Paivio used the idea that the formation of mental images aids in learning (Reed, 2010). According to Paivio, there are two ways a person could expand on learned material: ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Duality (CoPs)

    • In the context of a community of practice, the notion of a duality is used to capture the idea of the tension between two opposing forces which become a driving force for change and creativity. Wenger (Wenger 1998) uses the concept of dualities to examine the forces that create and sustain a Community of Practice. He d ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dyad pedagogy

    • Dyad pedagogy is a goal-directed teaching method. Students are randomly assigned into and work together on inquiry-type problems. The educational method was developed by Dr. Lloyd Sherman, a professor at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City during the 1990s. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Dyslexia

    • Dyslexia

      Dyslexia, also known as reading disorder, is characterized by trouble with reading despite normal intelligence. Different people are affected to varying degrees. Problems may include difficulties in spelling words, reading quickly, writing words, "sounding out" words in the head, pronouncing words when reading aloud an ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • E-learning (theory)

    • E-learning theory describes the cognitive science principles of effective multimedia learning using electronic educational technology. Cognitive research and theory suggest that the selection of appropriate concurrent multimedia modalities may enhance learning, as may application of several other principle. Beginn ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Educational assessment

    • Educational assessment is the process of documenting, usually in measurable terms, knowledge, skill, attitudes, and beliefs. It is a tool or method of obtaining information from tests or other sources about the achievement or abilities of individuals. Often used interchangeably with test.Assessment can focus on the ind ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Educational data mining

    • Educational Data Mining (EDM) describes a research field concerned with the application of data mining, machine learning and statistics to information generated from educational settings (e.g., universities and intelligent tutoring systems). At a high level, the field seeks to develop and improve methods for exploring ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Educational evaluation

    • Educational evaluation is the evaluation process of characterizing and appraising some aspect/s of an educational process. There are two common purposes in educational evaluation which are, at times, in conflict with one another. Educational institutions usually require evaluation data to demonstrate effectiveness to ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Educational measurement

    • Educational measurement refers to the use of educational assessments and the analysis of data such as scores obtained from educational assessments to infer the abilities and proficiencies of students. The approaches overlap with those in psychometrics. Educational measurement is the assigning of numerals to traits such ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Educational research

    • Educational research refers to the systematic collection and analysis of data related to the field of education. Research may involve a variety of methods. Research may involve various aspects of education including student learning, teaching methods, teacher training, and classroom dynamics. Educational researchers g ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Educational technology

    • Educational technology is defined by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology as "the study and ethical practice of facilitating learning and improving performance by creating, using, and managing appropriate technological processes and resources". Educational technology refers to the use of both ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Electronic assessment

    • Electronic assessment, also known as e-assessment, online assessment, computer assisted/mediated assessment and computer-based assessment, is the use of information technology in various forms of assessment such as educational assessment, health assessment, psychiatric assessment, and psychological assessment. This may ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Emergent Design

    • Emergent Design is a phrase coined by David Cavallo to describe a theoretical framework for the implementation of systemic change in education and learning environments. This examines how choice of design methodology contributes to the success or failure of education reforms through studies in Thailand. It is related t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Enactive interfaces

    • Enactive interfaces are interactive systems that allow organization and transmission of knowledge obtained through action. Examples are interfaces that couple a human with a machine to do things usually done unaided, such as shaping a three-dimensional object using multiple modality interactions with a data base, or us ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Enactivism

    • Enactivism argues that cognition arises through a dynamic interaction between an acting organism and its environment. It claims that our environment is one which we selectively create through our capacities to interact with the world. "Organisms do not passively receive information from their environments, which they t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Engineering education

    • Engineering education is the activity of teaching knowledge and principles to the professional practice of engineering. It includes the initial education (Bachelor and or Masters degree) for becoming an engineer, and any advanced education and specializations that follow. Engineering education is typically accompanied ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Environmental enrichment

    • Environmental enrichment is the stimulation of the brain by its physical and social surroundings. Brains in richer, more stimulating environments have higher rates of synaptogenesis and more complex dendrite arbors, leading to increased brain activity. This effect takes place primarily during neurodevelopment, but also ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Evolutionary educational psychology

    • Evolutionary educational psychology is the study of the relation between inherent folk knowledge and abilities and accompanying inferential and attributional biases as these influence academic learning in evolutionarily novel cultural contexts, such as schools and the industrial workplace. The fundamental premises and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Example choice

    • Example choice is a teaching method that has been developed and explored at the University of Bergen. The main objective is to make mathematics and science teaching more interesting and relevant to the daily life of students. One study by Perkins, Gratny, Adams, Finkelstein, and Wieman found that interest in physics de ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Excellence

    • Excellence is a talent or quality which is unusually good and so surpasses ordinary standards. It is also used as a standard of performance as measured e.g. through economic indicators. Excellence is a continuously moving target that can be pursued through actions of integrity, being frontrunner in terms of products / ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Expeditionary learning schools

    • Expeditionary Learning Schools are models of comprehensive school reform based on the educational ideas of German educator Kurt Hahn, the founder of Outward Bound. There are more than 150 Expeditionary Learning Schools in 30 US states and the District of Columbia. They are exemplified by project-based learning expediti ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Experiential education

    • Experiential education is a philosophy of education that describes the process that occurs between a teacher and student that infuses direct experience with the learning environment and content. The term is not interchangeable with experiential learning; however experiential learning is a sub-field and operates under t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Factor analysis

    • Factor analysis is a statistical method used to describe variability among observed, correlated variables in terms of a potentially lower number of unobserved variables called factors. For example, it is possible that variations in six observed variables mainly reflect the variations in two unobserved (underlying) vari ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Flow (psychology)

    • In positive psychology, flow, also known as the zone, is the mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity. In essence, flow is characterized by complete absorption in what one does. N ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Foreign language anxiety

    • Foreign language anxiety (or xenoglossophobia) is the feeling of , worry, nervousness and apprehension experienced when learning or using a second or foreign language. These feelings may stem from any second language context whether associated with the productive skills of speaking and writing, or the receptive skills ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Formal learning

    • Formal learning, normally delivered by trained teachers in a systematic intentional way within a school, academy/college/institute or university, is one of three forms of learning as defined by the OECD, the others being informal learning, which typically takes place naturally as part of some other activity, and non-fo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Formative assessment

    • Formative assessment, including diagnostic testing, is a range of formal and informal assessment procedures conducted by teachers during the learning process in order to modify teaching and learning activities to improve student attainment. It typically involves qualitative feedback (rather than scores) for both studen ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Generation effect

    • The generation effect is a phenomenon where information is better remembered if it is generated from one's own mind rather than simply read. Researchers have struggled to account for why generated information is better recalled than read information, but no single explanation has been sufficient. The generation ef ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Genetic epistemology

    • Genetic epistemology is a study of the origins (genesis) of knowledge (epistemology). In English, genetics refers to heredity. The terminology 'developmental theory of knowledge' and Genesic epistemology are perhaps better. The discipline was established by Jean Piaget. The goal of genetic epistemology is to link ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Gifted Rating Scales


    • Goal theory

    • Goal theory is the label used in educational psychology to discuss research into motivation to learn. Goals of learning are thought to be a key factor influencing the level of a student's intrinsic motivation. Research in goal theory has identified the following dichotomies: A student is described as task-involve ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Graphic organizer

    • A graphic organizer, also known as a knowledge map, concept map, story map (or storymap), cognitive organizer, advance organizer, or concept diagram, is a communication tool that uses visual symbols to express knowledge, concepts, thoughts, or ideas, and the relationships between them. The main purpose of a graphic org ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Group cognition

    • Group cognition refers to an analytic viewpoint that looks beyond individual cognition to include the interaction of individuals with other people, with artifacts and with cultural resources as producing cognitive products through their interaction. Accordingly, cognition or thinking can be analyzed in a number of ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Halo effect

    • The halo effect is a cognitive bias in which an observer's overall impression of a person, company, brand, or product influences the observer's feelings and thoughts about that entity's character or properties. It was named by psychologist Edward Thorndike in reference to a person being perceived as having a halo. Subs ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hands On Learning Australia

    • Hands On Learning Australia is a not-for-profit organisation listed as a Harm Prevention Charity by the Australian Government. The charity was assisted to come into being by Social Ventures Australia and became an Australian company in 2008 with a board of directors providing governance and oversight. The charity was f ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • High-stakes testing

    • A high-stakes test is a test with important consequences for the test taker. Passing has important benefits, such as a high school diploma, a scholarship, or a license to practice a profession. Failing has important disadvantages, such as being forced to take remedial classes until the test can be passed, not being all ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Homework coach

    • An homework coach is a category of tutor whose mission is to help a student's overall academic success as opposed to providing remedial instruction in a specific subject. A parent might hire a homework coach when their child is struggling in school not because they have difficulties with the academic material but becau ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Human performance technology

    • Human performance technology (HPT), also known as human performance improvement (HPI), or human performance assessment (HPA), is a field of study related to process improvement methodologies such as lean management, Six Sigma, lean Six Sigma, organization development, motivation, instructional technology, human factors ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Hyperkinetic disorder

    • Hyperkinetic disorder is a psychiatric syndrome emerging in early childhood that features an enduring pattern of severe, developmentally inappropriate inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity across different settings (e.g., home and school) that significantly impair academic, social and work performance. Hyperkinet ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Inclusion (education)

    • Inclusion in education is an approach to educating students with special educational needs. Under the inclusion model, students with special needs spend most or all of their time with non-special needs students. Inclusion rejects the use of special schools or classrooms to separate students with disabilities from stude ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Inert knowledge

    • Inert knowledge is information which one can express but not use. The process of understanding by learners does not happen to that extent where the knowledge can be used for effective problem-solving in realistic situations. The phenomenon of inert knowledge was first described in 1929 by Alfred North Whitehead: "[T] ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Informal learning

    • Informal learning is, by default, any learning that is not formal learning or non-formal learning. Informal learning is organized differently than formal and non-formal learning because it has no set objective in terms of learning outcomes and is never intentional from the learner’s standpoint. Often, it is referr ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Information design

    • Information design is the practice of presenting information in a way that fosters efficient and effective understanding of it. The term has come to be used specifically for graphic design for displaying information effectively, rather than just attractively or for artistic expression. Information design is closely rel ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Inquiry education

    • Inquiry education (sometimes known as the inquiry method) is a student-centered method of education focused on asking questions. Students are encouraged to ask questions which are meaningful to them, and which do not necessarily have easy answers; teachers are encouraged to avoid giving answers when this is possible, a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Inquiry in motion

    • Inquiry in motion (IIM) has a goal of improving the motivation, potential, and achievement of students and teachers through sustained engagement in science, math, engineering, and technology. IIM achieves increased teaching performance and improved student achievement largely by providing numerous support structures fo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Inquiry-based learning

    • Inquiry-based learning (also enquiry-based learning in British English) starts by posing questions, problems or scenarios—rather than simply presenting established facts or portraying a smooth path to knowledge. The process is often assisted by a facilitator. Inquirers will identify and research issues and questio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Institutional pedagogy

    • Institutional pedagogy is a practice of education that is centered on two factors: 1. the complexity of the learner, and the "unconscious" that he or she brings to the classroom. This unconscious is another name for the diversity of social, economic, cultural and other unspoken elements that an educator interacts with ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Instructional animation

    • Instructional animations are animations that are used either to provide instructions for immediate performance of a task or to support more permanent learning of subject matter. While both of these uses can be described as instructional animations, when the goal is to support learning, the term educational animation ma ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Instructional design

    • Instructional design, or instructional systems design (ISD), is the practice of creating "instructional experiences which make the acquisition of knowledge and skill more efficient, effective, and appealing." The process consists broadly of determining the state and needs of the learner, defining the end goal of instru ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Instructional scaffolding

    • Instructional scaffolding is a learning process designed to promote a deeper level of learning. Scaffolding is the support given during the learning process which is tailored to the needs of the student with the intention of helping the student achieve his/her learning goals Instructional scaffolding is the provision ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Instructor-led training

    • Instructor-led training, or ILT, is the practice of training and learning material between an instructor and learners, either individuals or groups. Instructors can also be referred to as a facilitator, who may be knowledgeable and experienced in the learning material, but can also be used more for their facilitati ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Integrative learning

    • Integrative learning is a learning theory describing a movement toward integrated lessons helping students make connections across curricula. This higher education concept is distinct from the elementary and high school "integrated curriculum" movement. Integrative Learning comes in many varieties: connecting skil ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Intellectual giftedness


    • Intelligence

    • Intelligence has been defined in many different ways including as one's capacity for logic, understanding, self-awareness, learning, emotional knowledge, planning, creativity and problem solving. It can be more generally described as the ability to perceive information, and to retain it as knowledge to be applied towar ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Intelligent tutoring system

    • An intelligent tutoring system (ITS) is a computer system that aims to provide immediate and customized instruction or feedback to learners, usually without intervention from a human teacher. ITSs have the common goal of enabling learning in a meaningful and effective manner by using a variety of computing technologies ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Intercultural communicative competence in computer-supported collaborative learning

    • Intercultural communicative competence in computer-supported collaborative learning is the application of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) to provide intercultural communicative competence (ICC). One of the well-known applications of CSCL is telecollaboration involving the use of the Internet or ot ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Ipsative

    • Ipsative (/ˈɪpsətɪv/; Latin: , "of the self") is a descriptor used in psychology to indicate a specific type of measure in which respondents compare two or more desirable options and pick the one that is most preferred (sometimes called a "forced choice" scale). This is contrasted with measures that use Lik ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Jigsaw (teaching technique)

    • The jigsaw technique is a method of organizing classroom activity that makes students dependent on each other to succeed. It breaks classes into groups and breaks assignments into pieces that the group assembles to complete the (jigsaw) puzzle. It was designed by social psychologist Elliot Aronson to help weaken racial ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Kharkov school of psychology

    • The Kharkiv school of psychology (Харьківска психологічна школа) is a tradition of developmental psychological research conducted in the paradigm of Lev Vygotsky's "sociocultural theory of mind" and Leontiev's psychological activity theory ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Kinesthetic learning

    • Kinesthetic learning (American English), kinaesthetic learning (British English), or tactile learning is a learning style in which learning takes place by the students carrying out physical activities, rather than listening to a lecture or watching demonstrations. People with a preference for kinesthetic learning are a ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Knowledge building

    • The Knowledge Building (KB) theory was created and developed by Carl Bereiter and Marlene Scardamalia for describing what a community of learners needs to accomplish in order to create knowledge. The theory addresses the need to educate people for the knowledge age society, in which knowledge and innovation are pervasi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Knowledge building community

    • A Knowledge Building Community (KBC) is a community in which the primary goal is knowledge creation rather than the construction of specific products or the completion of tasks. This notion is fundamental in Knowledge building theory. If knowledge is not realized for a community then we do not have knowledge building. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Knowledge deficit

    • The science literacy/knowledge deficit model states that the public is willing and able to process information if it is available. Therefore, a lack of public support or participation is caused by a lack of information available to the public. Audiences can and should acquire as much info as possible about science and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Knowledge divide

    • The knowledge divide is the gap in standards of living between those who can find, create, manage, process, and disseminate information or knowledge, and those who are impaired in this process. According to a 2005 UNESCO World Report, the rise in the 21st century of a global information society has resulted in the emer ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Knowledge transfer

    • In organizational theory, knowledge transfer is the practical problem of transferring knowledge from one part of the organization to another. Like knowledge management, knowledge transfer seeks to organize, create, capture or distribute knowledge and ensure its availability for future users. It is considered to be more ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Language-learning aptitude

    • Language learning aptitude refers to the “prediction of how well, relative to other individuals, an individual can learn a foreign language in a given amount of time and under given conditions.” As with many measures of aptitude, language learning aptitude is thought to be relatively stable once a person mat ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Large-group capacitation

    • Large-group capacitation is an adult education and social psychology concept associated with the Brazilian sociologist Clodomir Santos de Morais, and grounded in the "activity" of the individual and the social psychology of the large group. When applied to the context of the Organization Workshop (OW), which, historica ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Latchkey kid

    • A latchkey kid or latchkey child is a child who returns from school to an empty home because their parent or parents are away at work, or a child who is often left at home with little parental supervision. The term refers to the latchkey of a door to a house. The key is often strung around the child's neck or left ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Latent learning

    • Latent learning is a form of learning that is not immediately expressed in an overt response; it occurs without any obvious reinforcement of the behavior or associations that are learned. Interest in latent learning arose largely because the phenomenon seemed to conflict with the widely held view that reinforcement was ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Learning

    • Learning is the act of acquiring new, or modifying and reinforcing existing, knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, or preferences which may lead to a potential change in synthesizing information, depth of the knowledge, attitude or behavior relative to the type and range of experience. The ability to learn is possessed ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Learning artifact (education)

    • In educational psychology , a learning artifact (or educational artifact) is an object created by students during the course of instruction. To be considered an artifact, an object needs to be lasting, durable, public, and materially present. Under the constructionist theory of educational psychology, the concept of ma ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Learning by teaching

    • In professional education, learning by teaching (German: , short LdL) designates currently the method by Jean-Pol Martin that allows pupils and students to prepare and to teach lessons, or parts of lessons. Learning by teaching should not be confused with presentations or lectures by students, as students not only conv ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Learning disability

    • Learning disability

      Learning disability is a classification that includes several areas of functioning in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner, usually caused by an unknown factor or factors. Given the "difficulty learning in a typical manner", this does not exclude the ability to learn in a different manner. Therefo ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Learning nugget

    • Learning nuggets is a standalone mini learning activity, usually less than 5 minutes in length, that would vary in size and scope that learners undertake in a particular context in order to attain specific learning outcomes A learning nugget task will take a prescribed length of time and may, or may not be assessed. Nu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Learning sciences

    • Learning science or learning sciences (LS) is an interdisciplinary field that works to further scientific understanding of learning as well as to engage in the design and implementation of learning innovations, and the improvement of instructional methodologies. Research in the learning science traditionally focuses on ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Learning styles

    • Learning styles refer to a range of competing and contested theories that aim to account for differences in individuals' learning. These theories propose that all people can be classified according to their '' of learning, although the various theories present differing views on how the styles should be defined and cat ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Learning theory (education)

    • Learning theory may refer to: ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lecture

    • A lecture (from the French 'lecture', meaning 'reading' [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. A politic ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Legitimate peripheral participation

    • Legitimate peripheral participation (LPP) describes how newcomers become experienced members and eventually old timers of a community of practice or collaborative project (Lave & Wenger 1991). According to LPP, newcomers become members of a community initially by participating in simple and low-risk tasks that are none ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lifelong learning

    • Lifelong learning is the "ongoing, voluntary, and self-motivated" pursuit of knowledge for either personal or professional reasons. Therefore, it not only enhances social inclusion, active citizenship, and personal development, but also self-sustainability, as well as competitiveness and employability. Evolved from t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Lifewide learning

    • Lifewide learning (LWL) is a teaching strategy and an approach to learning and personal development that involves real contexts and authentic settings. The goal is to address different kinds of learning not covered in a traditional classroom. By including LWL with a traditional classroom, students are better equipped t ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Linear-on-the-fly testing

    • Linear-on-the-fly testing, often referred to as LOFT, is a method of delivering educational or professional examinations. Competing methods include traditional linear fixed-form delivery and computerized adaptive testing. LOFT is a compromise between the two, in an effort to maintain the equivalence of the set of items ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • List of autodidacts

    • This is a list of notable autodidacts which includes people who have been partially or wholly self-taught. Because of the large increase in years of education since 1800, especially during the early 20th century, it is difficult to define autodidactism and to compare autodidacts during different time periods. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Literate environment

    • A literate environment may include written materials (newspapers, books and posters), electronic and broadcast media (radios and TVs) and information and communications technology (phones, computers and Internet access), which encourage literacy acquisition, a reading culture, improved literacy retention and access to ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Maimonides' rule


    • MaMaMedia, Inc.

    • MaMaMedia was an educational consulting firm run by Idit Harel Caperton, specializing in applications of constructionist learning theory. Founded in 1995, MaMaMedia.com was designed to foster digital literacy skills for children using constructionist theory principles. It was awarded the GII Award for Education in 199 ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Marte Meo

    • Marte Meo (Latin "by own power") is a method of educational counselling. It was developed in the late 1970s and early 1980s by the Dutch educational counsellor Maria Aarts. She recognised the difficulties in explaining scientific observations of a child's problems to parents and other educators, as they are often unab ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mathematical anxiety

    • Mathematical anxiety is anxiety about one's ability to do mathematics. It is a phenomenon that is often considered when examining students' problems in mathematics. Mark H. Ashcraft defines math anxiety as "a feeling of tension, apprehension, or fear that interferes with math performance" (2002, p. 1). The firs ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Meaningful play

    • Meaningful play are actions or activities built with either a designed or inherent intent, such as data collection or therapy. Meaning is defined as the underlying purpose of the topic or subject at hand, while play itself is defined as a range of voluntary, intrinsically motivated activities normally associated with ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Melodic learning

    • Melodic Learning is a multimodal learning method that uses the defining elements of singing (pitch, rhythm and rhyme) to facilitate the capture, storage and retrieval of information. Widely recognized examples of Melodic Learning include using the alphabet song to learn the alphabet and This Old Man to learn counting. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mental health in education

    • Mental health issues has been a big problem in the world. It is even more difficult for those students who are in the school environment trying to receive an education. It has become more of a problem compared to other issues. With the issues of mental health condition, it limits the students ability to learn and get c ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Metacognition

    • Metacognition is "cognition about cognition", "thinking about thinking", or "knowing about knowing" and higher order thinking skills. It comes from the root word "meta", meaning beyond. It can take many forms; it includes knowledge about when and how to use particular strategies for learning or for problem solving. The ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Microlearning

    • Microlearning deals with relatively small learning units and short-term learning activities. Generally, the term "microlearning" refers to micro-perspectives in the context of learning, education and training. More frequently, the term is used in the domain of e-learning and related fields in the sense of a new paradig ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mnemonic

    • A mnemonic (RpE: /nəˈmɒnáµ»k/,AmE: /nɛˈmɑːnɪk/ the first "m" is silent) device, or memory device is any learning technique that aids information retention in the human memory. Mnemonics make use of elaborative encoding, retrieval cues, and imagery as specific tools to encode any given informa ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Modality effect

    • The modality effect is a term used in experimental psychology, most often in the fields dealing with memory and learning, to refer to how learner performance depends on the presentation mode of studied items. Modality can refer to a number of characteristics of the presented study material. However, this term is u ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mokken scale

    • The Mokken Scale is a psychometric method of data reduction. A Mokken scale is a unidimensional scale that consists of hierarchically-ordered items that measure the same underlying, latent concept. This method is named after the political scientist Rob Mokken who suggested it in 1971. Mokken Scales have been used in p ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Montessori education

    • Montessori education is an educational approach developed by Italian physician and educator Maria Montessori based on her extensive research with "phrenasthenic" (mentally challenged) children and characterized by an emphasis on independence, freedom within limits, and respect for a child's natural psychological, physi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Montessori sensorial materials

    • Montessori sensorial materials are materials used in the Montessori classroom to help a child develop and refine his or her five senses. Use of these materials constitutes the next level of difficulty after those of practical life. Like many other materials in the Montessori classroom, sensorial materials have what is ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Moral reasoning

    • Moral reasoning is a study in psychology that overlaps with moral philosophy. It is also called moral development. Prominent contributors to the theory include Lawrence Kohlberg and Elliot Turiel. The term is sometimes used in a different sense: reasoning under conditions of uncertainty, such as those commonly obtained ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Mozart effect

    • The Mozart effect can refer to: The term was first coined by Alfred A. Tomatis who used Mozart's music as the listening stimulus in his work attempting to cure a variety of disorders. The approach has been popularized in Don Campbell's book, The Mozart Effect, which is based on an experiment published in Nature sugges ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Multipotentiality

    • Multipotentiality is an educational and psychological term referring to the ability and preference of a person, particularly one of strong intellectual or artistic curiosity, to excel in two or more different fields. It can also refer to an individual whose interests span multiple fields or areas, rather than being st ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Need for cognition

    • The need for cognition (NFC), in psychology, is a personality variable reflecting the extent to which individuals are inclined towards effortful cognitive activities. Need for cognition has been variously defined as "a need to structure relevant situations in meaningful, integrated ways" and "a need to understand and ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Neurodevelopmental framework for learning

    • Neurodevelopmental framework for learning, like all frameworks, is an organizing structure through which learners and learning can be understood. Intelligence theories and neuropsychology inform many of them. The framework described below is a neurodevelopmental framework for learning. The neurodevelopmental framework ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Non-Verbal Reasoning

    • In non-verbal reasoning (NVR) diagrams are used for expressing the ideas instead of using numbers and words. Non-verbal reasoning shows a series of figures arranged in a sequence or pattern and then the missing figure is required to identified or the next in the sequence. Because the non-verbal reasoning questions are ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Nonformal learning

    • Non-formal learning is a loosely defined term covering various structured learning situations, such as swimming sessions for toddlers, community-based sports programs and conference style seminars, which do not either have the level of curriculum, syllabus, accreditation and certification associated with 'formal learni ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Norm-referenced test

    • A norm-referenced test (NRT) is a type of test, assessment, or evaluation which yields an estimate of the position of the tested individual in a predefined population, with respect to the trait being measured. The estimate is derived from the analysis of test scores and possibly other relevant data from a sample drawn ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Note-taking

    • Note-taking (sometimes written as notetaking or note taking) is the practice of recording information captured from another source. By taking notes, the writer records the essence of the information, freeing their mind from having to recall everything. Notes are commonly drawn from a transient source, such as an oral d ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Number sense

    • In mathematics education, number sense can refer to "an intuitive understanding of numbers, their magnitude, relationships, and how they are affected by operations." Other definitions of number sense emphasize an ability to work outside of the traditionally taught algorithms, e.g., "a well organised conceptual framewor ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Opportunistic collaboration

    • Opportunistic collaboration is a flexible, emergent design for collaborative learning. In this process, groups form, break up, and recombine as part of an emerging process, with all participants aware of and helping to advance the structure of the whole. This is different from fixed, small group collaboration, in which ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Oral exam

    • The oral exam (also oral test or viva voce; Rigorosum in German-speaking nations) is a practice in many schools and disciplines in which an examiner poses questions to the student in spoken form. The student has to answer the question in such a way as to demonstrate sufficient knowledge of the subject to pass the exam. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Orality

    • Orality is thought and verbal expression in societies where the technologies of literacy (especially writing and print) are unfamiliar to most of the population. The study of orality is closely allied to the study of oral tradition. However, it has broader implications, implicitly touching every aspect of the economics ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Organization workshop

    • The Organization workshop (OW) – or "Laboratorio Organizacional" (LO) in both Portuguese and Spanish – is a CHAT-based learning event where participants master new organizational as well as social knowledge and skills through a learning-by-doing approach. It is aimed at large groups of unemployed and underemp ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Organizational learning

    • Organizational learning is the process of creating, retaining, and transferring knowledge within an organization. An organization improves over time as it gains experience. From this experience, it is able to create knowledge. This knowledge is broad, covering any topic that could better an organization. Examples may i ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Oswego Movement

    • The Oswego Movement (or Oswego Plan as it is sometimes called) was a movement in American education during the late 19th Century. It was based on the methods of Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi and introduced by Edward Austin Sheldon at Oswego Primary Teachers' Training School (now State University of New York at Oswego). Th ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Overachievement

    • Overachievers are individuals who "perform better or achieve more success than expected." The implicit presumption is that the "overachiever" is achieving superior results through excessive effort. In a teaching context, an "overachiever" is an educational label applied to students, who perform better than their peers ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Overjustification effect

    • The overjustification effect occurs when an expected external such as money or prizes decreases a person's intrinsic motivation to perform a task. The overall effect of offering a reward for a previously unrewarded activity is a shift to extrinsic motivation and the undermining of pre-existing intrinsic motivation. On ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Overlearning

    • Overlearning refers to practicing newly acquired skills beyond the point of initial mastery. The term is also often used to refer to the pedagogical theory that this form of practice leads to automaticity or other beneficial consequences. Memory researcher Herman Ebbinghaus performed classical overlearning studies ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Oxford Developmental Preschool Program

    • The Oxford Development Preschool Program™ in Great Britain, is an internationally recognized, successful approach to early childhood development, that emphasizes a caring, nurturing, positive atmosphere, for preschoolers to learn through personal, directed experience and creativity. In the Oxford Program, every mi ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • PASS theory of intelligence

    • The Planning, Attention-Arousal, Simultaneous and Successive (PASS) theory of intelligence, first proposed in 1975 ( Das, Kirby, and Jarman,1975), and later elaborated by Das, Naglieri & Kirby(1994) and Das, Kar & Parrila, (1996) challenges g-theory on the grounds that the brain is made up of interdependent, but separa ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Passive learning

    • Passive learning is a method of learning or instruction where students receive information from the instructor and internalize it, often through some form of memorization or rote learning, and "where the learner receives no feedback from the instructor". The term is often used together with direct instruction and lectu ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pedagogical patterns

    • Pedagogical patterns are high-level patterns that have been recognized in many areas of training and pedagogy such as group work, software design, human computer interaction, education and others. The concept is an extension of pattern languages. In both cases, the patterns seek to foster best practices of teaching. A ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pedagogy

    • Pedagogy is the discipline that deals with the theory and practice of education; it thus concerns the study of how best to teach. Spanning a broad range of practice, its aims range from furthering liberal education (the general development of human potential) to the narrower specifics of vocational education (the impar ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Peer mentoring

    • Peer mentoring is a form of mentorship that usually takes place between a person who has lived through a specific experience (peer mentor) and a person who is new to that experience (the peer mentee). An example would be an experienced student being a peer mentor to a new student, the peer mentee, in a particular subje ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Peer support

    • Peer support occurs when people provide knowledge, experience, emotional, social or practical help to each other. It commonly refers to an initiative consisting of trained supporters (although it can be provided by peers without training), and can take a number of forms such as peer mentoring, listening, or counseling. ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Peer support specialist

    • A Certified Peer Support Specialist also known as a Certified Peer Specialist is a person with significant life-altering experience. This is also referred to as lived experience. These specialists support individuals with struggles pertaining to mental health, psychological trauma or substance use. Because of their liv ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Personalized learning

    • Personalized learning, individualized instruction, personal learning environment and direct instruction all refer to efforts to tailor education to meet the different needs of students. The use of the term "personalized learning" dates back to at least the early 1960s, but there is no widespread agreement on the d ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Phonological awareness

    • Phonological awareness refers to an individual's awareness of the phonological structure, or sound structure, of words. Phonological awareness is an important and reliable predictor of later reading ability and has, therefore, been the focus of much research. Phonological awareness involves the detection and manip ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Phrase completions

    • Phrase completion scales are a type of psychometric scale used in questionnaires. Developed in response to the problems associated with Likert scales, Phrase completions are concise, unidimensional measures that tap ordinal level data in a manner that approximates interval level data. Phrase completions consist of ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Picture superiority effect

    • The picture superiority effect refers to the phenomenon in which pictures and images are more likely to be remembered than words. This effect has been demonstrated in numerous experiments using different methods. It is based on the notion that "human memory is extremely sensitive to the symbolic modality of presentatio ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center

    • The Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center (aka LearnLab) is a Science of Learning Center funded by the National Science Foundation and managed by Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. The PSLC is led by Kenneth Koedinger and Charles Perfetti, and includes many other notable scientists, including ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Poisonous pedagogy

    • Poisonous pedagogy, also called black pedagogy (from the original German name Schwarze Pädagogik), is a psychological and sociological term describing a subset of traditional child-raising methods which modern sociologists and psychologists describe as repressive and harmful. It includes behaviors and communication ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    • Principle of least effort

    • The principle of least effort is a broad theory that covers diverse fields from evolutionary biology to webpage design. It postulates that animals, people, even well-designed machines will naturally choose the path of least resistance or "effort". It is closely related to many other similar principles: see Principle of ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    Wikipedia
  • What Else?

    • Educational psychology

Extras