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  • Education economics

    Education economics

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Education economics

    • Education finance

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about Education finance


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    • State schools

    • This piglix contains articles or sub-piglix about State schools


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    • Education economics

    • Education economics or the economics of education is the study of economic issues relating to education, including the demand for education and the financing and provision of education. From early works on the relationship between schooling and labor market outcomes for individuals, the field of the economics of educat ... Read »


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    • Capitation fee

    • Capitation fee refers to an illegal transaction whereby an organisation that provides (or supposedly provides) educational services collects a fee that is more than what is approved by regulatory norms. In the context of Indian law, a capitation fee refers to the collection of payment by educational bodies not inc ... Read »


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    • College tuition in the United States

    • College tuition in the United States is the privately borne cost of higher education collected by educational institutions in the United States, excluding the portion that is paid through taxes or from other government funds as supply-side subsidies to colleges and universities, or demand-side subsidies to students, or ... Read »


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    • Higher education bubble in the United States

    • The higher education bubble in the United States is a claim that excessive investment in higher education could have negative repercussions in the broader economy. According to the claim – generally associated with fiscal conservatives – while college tuition payments are rising, the supply of college ... Read »


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    • Deskilling

    • Deskilling is the process by which skilled labor within an industry or economy is eliminated by the introduction of technologies operated by semiskilled or unskilled workers. This results in cost savings due to lower investment in human capital, and reduces barriers to entry, weakening the bargaining power of the human ... Read »


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    • Dual-career commuter couples

    • Commuter couples are a subset of dual-career couples who live apart in separate residences while both partners pursue careers. Gilbert and Rachlin address the difference between dual-earner families and dual-career families, distinguishing that dual-earner couples are those in which both spouses are earning for the fa ... Read »


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    • Educational attainment

    • Educational attainment is a term commonly used by statisticians to refer to the highest degree of education an individual has completed as defined by the US Census Bureau Glossary. ... Read »


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    • European Lifelong Learning Indicators

    • The development of the European Lifelong Learning Indicators (ELLI) is an initiative of the non-profit Bertelsmann Stiftung to monitor the state of lifelong learning in Europe. The main focus of the ELLI project is the ELLI Index. The ELLI index is an annually updated composite indicator summarizing the state of lifelo ... Read »


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    • Human capital

    • Human capital is a term popularized by Gary Becker, an economist from the University of Chicago, and Jacob Mincer that refers to the stock of knowledge, habits, social and personality attributes, including creativity, embodied in the ability to perform labor so as to produce economic value. Alternatively, human capita ... Read »


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    • Learning effect (economics)

    • In economics, the learning effect is the process by which education increases productivity and results in higher wages. ... Read »


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    • Life chances

    • Life chances (Lebenschancen in German) is a social science theory of the each individual has to improve his or her quality of life. The concept was introduced by German sociologist Max Weber. It is a probabilistic concept, describing how likely it is, given certain factors, that an individual's life will turn out a ce ... Read »


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    • Private university

    • Private universities are not operated by governments, although many receive tax breaks, public student loans, and grants. Depending on their location, private universities may be subject to government regulation. This is in contrast to public universities and national universities. Most private universities are non-pro ... Read »


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    • School choice

    • School choice is a IDK term for K–12 public education options in the United States, describing a wide array of programs offering students and their families alternatives to publicly provided schools, to which students are generally assigned by the location of their family residence. In the United States, the most ... Read »


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    • School Lands

    • School Lands are land grants established in support of education. Support for public education in the United States predates the constitution; two years before the adoption of the United States Constitution of 1787, the Congress of the Confederation provided support for public schooling by establishing the land grants ... Read »


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    • School voucher

    • A school voucher, also called an education voucher, in a voucher system, is a certificate of government funding for a student at a school chosen by the student or the student's parents. The funding is usually for a particular year, term or semester. In some countries, states or local jurisdictions, the voucher can be u ... Read »


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    • Screening (economics)

    • Screening in economics refers to a strategy of combating adverse selection, one of the potential decision-making complications in cases of asymmetric information, by the agent(s) with less information. The concept of screening was first developed by Michael Spence (1973), and should be distinguished from signalling, a ... Read »


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    • Student benefits

    • Student benefits are transfer payments that are given to students for purposes of full-time study, and require progress in studies, or obtaining academic credits. Student benefits are found in countries where education is free of charge, e.g. Finland and Sweden. Student benefit is paid by the state to all qualifying st ... Read »


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    • Tertiary education fees in Australia

    • Students enrolled in courses at Australian tertiary education institutions are charged higher education fees. However, government loans and subsidies are in place to relieve the costs of tertiary education in Australia. Some students are supported by the national government, known as the Commonwealth government. These ... Read »


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    • Two-body problem (career)

    • The two-body problem is a dilemma for life partners (for e.g. spouses or any other couple) in academia, relating to the difficulty of both spouses obtaining jobs at the same university or within a reasonable commuting distance from each other. The central dilemma is thus a no-win situation in which if the couple wishes ... Read »


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    • Uzawa–Lucas model


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    • Education economics

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