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    Drama

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    • Acting

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    • Dramatists and playwrights

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    • Drama by medium

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    • Drama by nationality

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    • Plays

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    • Drama characters

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    • Comedy-drama

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    • Crime drama

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    • Drama teachers

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    • Drama genres

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    • Masques

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    • Medieval drama

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    • Modernist theatre

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    • Monodrama

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    • Monologues

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    • Musical theatre

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    • Narratology

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    • One-act drama

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    • Plot (narrative)

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    • Political drama

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    • Postmodern theatre

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    • Drama schools

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    • Soap operas

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    • Spoken word

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    • Three-handers

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    • Tragedies (dramas)

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    • Two-handers

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    • Drama

    • Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance. The term comes from a Greek word meaning "action" (Classical Greek: δρᾶμα, drama), which is derived from "to do" (Classical Greek: δράω, drao). The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division be ... Read »


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    • Play (theatre)

    • A play is a form of literature written by a playwright, usually consisting of dialogue between characters, intended for theatrical performance rather than just reading. Plays are performed at a variety of levels, from Broadway, Off-Broadway, regional theater, to Community theatre, as well as University or school produc ... Read »


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    • Act (drama)

    • An act is a division or unit of a theatre work, including a play, film, opera, and musical theatre. The number of acts in theatrical work can range from one to five or more, depending on how the writer structures the story. The duration of an act usually ranges from 30 to 90 minutes, but may be as short as 10 minutes. ... Read »


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    • Adrenalin...Heart

    • Adrenalin...Heart is a two-hander play written by Georgia Fitch. A two character play about Leigh, a British, white, Catholic single mother with two children and a job in local government, and Angel, a black man that has done time at college and in jail and now deals drugs in Islington. ... Read »


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    • Antilabe

    • Antilabe (from the Greek: ἀντι "mutually" or "corresponding", λαβή, "grip" or "handle") is a rhetorical technique in verse drama or closet drama, in which a single verse line of dialogue is distributed on two or more characters, voices, or entities. The verse usually maintains its metric integ ... Read »


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    • Applied Drama

    • Applied Drama, also known as Applied Theatre, Interactive Theatre or Applied Drama and Theatre (ADT) is an umbrella term for the use of drama practice in an educational, community or therapeutic context. It is often done in non-theatrical spaces, with participants who do not consider themselves to be artists. There ar ... Read »


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    • Aqua drama

    • The theatrical genre of aqua drama that was popular in 19th century France, England, and the United States involved flooding the arenas of circuses for recreations of major naval conflicts and similar aquatic events; some venues participated to such a great extent in this once-popular form as to install permanent water ... Read »


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    • Aside

    • An aside is a dramatic device in which a character speaks to the audience. By convention the audience is to realize that the character's speech is unheard by the other characters on stage. It may be addressed to the audience expressly (in character or out) or represent an unspoken thought. An aside is usually a brief c ... Read »


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    • Augustan drama

    • Augustan drama can refer to the dramas of Ancient Rome during the reign of Caesar Augustus, but it most commonly refers to the plays of Great Britain in the early 18th century, a subset of 18th-century Augustan literature. King George I referred to himself as "Augustus," and the poets of the era took this reference as ... Read »


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    • Bourgeois tragedy

    • Bourgeois tragedy (German: Bürgerliches Trauerspiel) is a form of tragedy that developed in 18th-century Europe. It is a fruit of the enlightenment and the emergence of the bourgeois class and its ideals. It is characterized by the fact that its protagonists are ordinary citizens. There are a few examples of tr ... Read »


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    • Breeches role

    • A breeches role (also pants role or trouser role, travesti or "Hosenrolle") is a role in which an actress appears in male clothing. Breeches (/ˈbrɪtʃᵻz/, also "britches"), tight-fitting knee-length pants, were the standard male garment at the time breeches roles were introduced. In opera it also refers t ... Read »


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    • Burra katha

    • Burra katha, also spelled Burrakatha, is an oral storytelling technique in the Katha tradition, performed in villages of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. The troupe consists of one main performer and two co-performers. It is a narrative entertainment that consists of prayers, solo drama, dance, songs, poems and jokes. The ... Read »


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    • Catastasis

    • In classical tragedies, the catastasis (pl. catastases) is the third part of an ancient drama, in which the intrigue or action that was initiated in the epitasis, is supported and heightened, until ready to be unravelled in the catastrophe. It also refers to the climax of a drama. In rhetoric, the catastasis is that p ... Read »


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    • Catastrophe (drama)

    • In drama, particularly the tragedies of classical antiquity, the catastrophe is the final resolution in a poem or narrative plot, which unravels the intrigue and brings the piece to a close. In comedies, this may be a marriage between main characters; in tragedies, it may be the death of one or more main characters. It ... Read »


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    • Chamber play

    • A chamber play is a play of usually three acts which can be performed with a small cast and practically no sets or costumes in a small space. The form became popular in the early 20th century, with leading exponents being Max Reinhardt and August Strindberg. The first cinema adaptation was Kammerspielfilm in the 1920s, ... Read »


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    • Character (arts)

    • A character (sometimes known as a fictional character) is a person or other being in a narrative work of art (such as a novel, play, television series or film). The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made. Der ... Read »


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    • Circe in the arts

    • The sorceress Circe is a figure from Greek mythology whose father was the sun (Helios) and whose mother was an ocean nymph. She appears in three separate stories. The best known is when Odysseus visits her island of Aeaea on the way back from the Trojan War and she changes most of his crew into swine. He forces her to ... Read »


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    • Classical unities

    • The classical unities, Aristotelian unities, or three unities are rules for drama derived from a passage in Aristotle's Poetics. In their neoclassical form they are as follows: Aristotle dealt with the unity of action in some detail, under the general subject of "definition of tragedy", where he wrote: Now, accor ... Read »


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    • Closet drama

    • A closet drama is a play that is not intended to be performed onstage, but read by a solitary reader or, sometimes, out loud in a small group. The dichotomy between private 'closet' drama (designed for reading) and public 'stage' drama (designed for performance in a commercial theater setting) dates from the late eight ... Read »


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    • Closet screenplay

    • Related to closet drama, a closet screenplay is a screenplay intended not to be produced/performed but instead to be read by a solitary reader or, sometimes, out loud in a small group. While any published, or simply read, screenplay might reasonably be considered a "closet screenplay," 20th- and 21st-century Japanese ... Read »


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    • Cold reading (theatrical)

    • Theatrical cold reading is reading aloud from a script or other text with little or no rehearsal,practice or study in advance. Sometimes also referred to as sight reading, it is a technique used by actors and other performers in theatre, television, and film performance fields. Cold readings are common in performance ... Read »


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    • Comedy (drama)

    • A comedy is entertainment consisting of jokes intended to make an audience laugh. For ancient Greeks and Romans a comedy was a stage-play with a happy ending. In the Middle Ages, the term expanded to include narrative poems with happy endings and a lighter tone. In this sense Dante used the term in the title of his poe ... Read »


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    • Comedy of intrigue

    • The comedy of intrigue, also known as the comedy of situation, is a genre of comedy in which dramatic action is prioritised over the development of character, complicated strategems and conspiracies drive the plot, and farcical humour and contrived or ridiculous dramatic situations are often employed. Characterisation ... Read »


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    • Comedy of manners

    • The comedy of manners is an entertainment form which satirizes the manners and affectations of a social class or of multiple classes, often represented by stereotypical . For example, the miles gloriosus ("boastful soldier") in ancient times, the fop and the rake during the English Restoration, or an old person pretend ... Read »


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    • Deuteragonist

    • In literature, the deuteragonist or secondary main character (from Ancient Greek: δευτεραγωνιστής, deuteragōnistḗs, second actor) is the second most important character, after the protagonist and before the tritagonist. The deuteragonist may switch from being with ... Read »


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    • Domestic drama

    • Domestic drama expresses and focuses on the realistic everyday lives of middle or lower classes in a certain society, generally referring to the post-Renaissance eras. According to the English Communications Syllabus, domestic drama refers to a dramatic story containing an emphasis on its “characters' intimate rel ... Read »


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    • Domestic tragedy

    • In English drama, a domestic tragedy is a tragedy in which the tragic protagonists are ordinary middle-class or lower-class individuals. This subgenre contrasts with classical and Neoclassical tragedy, in which the protagonists are of kingly or rank and their downfall is an affair of state as well as a personal matter ... Read »


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    • Drama teaching techniques

    • There are many methods for teaching Drama. Each strategy involves varying levels of student participation. Drama games, activities and exercises are often used to introduce students to drama. These activities tend to be less intrusive and are highly participatory (e.g. Bang). There are several books that have bee ... Read »


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    • Dramatic monologue

    • Dramatic monologue, also known as a persona poem, is a type of poetry written in the form of a speech of an individual character. M.H. Abrams notes the following three features of the dramatic monologue as it applies to poetry One of the most important influences on the development of the dramatic monologue is rom ... Read »


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    • Dramatic theory

    • Dramatic theory is a term used for works that attempt to form theories about theatre and drama. Examples of ancient dramatic theory include Aristotle's Poetics from Ancient Greece and Bharata Muni's Natyasastra from ancient India. ... Read »


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    • Dramatization

    • Dramatization or dramatisation is the adapting of a literary source (e.g. a novel, short story, poem) to drama or theater. ... Read »


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    • Dramaturgy

    • Dramaturgy is the study of dramatic composition and the representation of the main elements of drama on the stage. The word dramaturgy was coined by Gotthold Ephraim Lessing in his influential work Hamburg Dramaturgy, written when he was employed by the Hamburg National Theatre as the world's first dramaturge. Dramatur ... Read »


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    • Duodrama

    • A duodrama is a theatrical melodrama for two actors or singers, in which the spoken voice is used with a musical accompaniment for heightened dramatic effect. It was popular at the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century. Closely related to opera, the most famous example were the 1775 works Ariadne auf N ... Read »


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    • Epitasis

    • In classical drama, the epitasis (Ancient Greek: ἐπίτασις) is the main action of a play, in which the trials and tribulations of the main character increase and build toward a climax and dénouement. It is the third and central part when a play is analyzed into five separate parts: prelud ... Read »


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    • Explorative strategies

    • Explorative strategies are used in drama to explore a theme or a text. They are associated with Edexcel GCSE. ... Read »


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    • Folk play

    • Folk plays such as Hoodening, Guising, Mummers Play and Soul Caking are generally verse sketches performed in countryside pubs in European countries, private houses or the open air, at set times of the year such as the Winter or Summer solstices or Christmas and New Year. Many have long traditions, although they are fr ... Read »


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    • Frames and distance

    • In drama, a frame is a situation or position of importance given to a person, and distance relates to how engaged the frame makes the group. For example: Dorothy Heathcote created the idea of frames and distance. These concepts can be applied to thinking about a target group and how willing they would be to interact ... Read »


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    • Hamburg Dramaturgy

    • Hamburg Dramaturgy (German: Hamburgische Dramaturgie) is a highly influential work on drama by Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, written between 1767 and 1769. It was not originally conceived as a unified and systematical book, but rather as series of theater reviews, which Lessing wrote when working as the world's first drama ... Read »


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    • Heroic drama

    • Heroic drama is a type of play popular during the Restoration era in England, distinguished by both its verse structure and its subject matter. The subgenre of heroic drama evolved through several works of the middle to later 1660s; John Dryden's The Indian Emperour (1665) and Roger Boyle's The Black Prince (1667) were ... Read »


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    • Historical period drama

    • A historical period drama (also known as a historical drama, period drama, costume drama, or period piece) is a work of art set in, or reminiscent of, an earlier time period. The term is usually used in the context of film and television. It is an informal crossover term that can apply to several genres but is most oft ... Read »


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    • Hyperdrama

    • Hyperdrama is a dramatic performance generated by playscripts written in hypertext. The performance is noted for its split narrative with scenes branching to play simultaneously in an expanded performance space. The audience is mobile, able to follow actors and watch scenes as each individual chooses. According to Ast ... Read »


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    • Induction (play)

    • An induction in a play is an explanatory scene, summary or other text that stands outside and apart from the main action with the intent to comment on it, moralize about it or in the case of dumb show to summarize the plot or underscore what is afoot. Typically, an induction precedes the main text of a play. Inductions ... Read »


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    • Intermedio

    • The intermedio [interˈmɛːdjo] (also intromessa, introdutto, tramessa, tramezzo, intermezzo), in the Italian Renaissance, was a theatrical performance or spectacle with music and often dance which was performed between the acts of a play to celebrate special occasions in Italian courts. It was one of the import ... Read »


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    • Meta-reference

    • Meta-reference, a metafiction technique, is a situation in a work of fiction whereby characters display an awareness that they are in such a work, such as a film, television show or book, and possibly that they are being observed by an audience. Sometimes it may even just be a form of editing or film-making technique t ... Read »


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    • Mimesis

    • Mimesis (/maɪˈmiːsəs/; Ancient Greek: μίμησις (mÄ«mēsis), from μιμεῖσθαι (mÄ«meisthai), "to imitate," from (mimos), "imitator, actor") is a critical and philosophical term that carries a wide range of meanings, which include imitation, representat ... Read »


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    • Monologue

    • In theatre, a monologue (from Greek: μονόλογος, from μόνος mónos, "alone, solitary" and λόγος lógos, "speech") is a speech presented by a single character, most often to express their mental thoughts aloud, though sometimes also to directly address another ... Read »


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    • Mystery play

    • Mystery plays (perhaps from the Latin "ministerium" meaning "occupation") and miracle plays (they are distinguished as two different forms although the terms are often used interchangeably) are among the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe. Medieval mystery plays focused on the representation of Bible ... Read »


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    • Nativity play

    • A Nativity play or Christmas pageant is a play which recounts the story of the Nativity of Jesus. It is usually performed at Christmas, the feast of the Nativity. The term "Nativity Drama" is used by Wellesz in his discussion of the troparion hymns in the Christmas liturgy of Byzantine Rite Churches, from Sophroni ... Read »


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    • Opera

    • Opera (Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting. In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, ... Read »


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    • Performance studies

    • Performance studies is an interdisciplinary field that studies and uses performance as a lens to study the world. The term 'performance' is broad, and can include artistic and aesthetic performances like concerts, theatrical events, and performance art; sporting events; social, political and religious events like ritu ... Read »


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    • Problem play

    • The problem play is a form of drama that emerged during the 19th century as part of the wider movement of realism in the arts, especially following the innovations of Henrik Ibsen. It deals with contentious social issues through debates between the characters on stage, who typically represent conflicting points of view ... Read »


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    • Process drama

    • Process drama is a method of teaching and learning drama where both the students and teacher are working in and out of role. As a teaching methodology, process drama developed primarily from the work of Brian Way, Dorothy Heathcote and Gavin Bolton and through the work of other leading drama practitioners.Cecily O'Nei ... Read »


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    • Protasis

    • In drama, a protasis is the introductory part of a play, usually its first act. The term was coined by the fourth-century Roman grammarian Aelius Donatus. He defined a play as being made up of three separate parts, the other two being epitasis and catastrophe. In modern dramatic theory the term dramatic arc has substan ... Read »


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    • Psychological effects of method acting

    • Method acting is employed by actors to evoke realistic emotions into their performance by drawing on personal experiences. Raymond Hamden, doctor of Clinical and Forensic Psychology, defines the purpose of method acting as “compartmentalizing their own feelings while playing another character [so] they could bring ... Read »


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    • Punch and Judy

    • Punch and Judy is a traditional, popular, and usually very violent puppet show featuring Pulcinella (Mr. Punch) and his wife Judy. The performance consists of a sequence of short scenes, each depicting an interaction between two characters, most typically Mr. Punch and one other character (who usually falls victim to M ... Read »


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    • Realism (theatre)

    • Realism in the theatre was a general movement that began in the 19th-century theatre, around the 1870s, and remained present through much of the 20th century. It developed a set of dramatic and theatrical conventions with the aim of bringing a greater fidelity of real life to texts and performances. Part of a broader a ... Read »


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    • Screenwriting

    • Screenwriting, also called scriptwriting, is the art and craft of writing scripts for mass media such as feature films, television productions or video games. It is frequently a freelance profession. Screenwriters are responsible for researching the story, developing the narrative, writing the screenplay, and deliveri ... Read »


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    • Seared (play)

    • Seared is a kitchen drama written by Theresa Rebeck. Its world premiere was held at the San Francisco Playhouse, California. The play is set in the kitchen of a struggling restaurant, as the protagonist Harry meets a clash of wills in this drama of ideology versus money. Harry is chef who takes great pride in his ... Read »


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    • Senecan tragedy

    • Senecan tragedy refers to a set of ancient Roman tragedies. Ten of these plays exist, of which most likely eight were written by the Stoic philosopher and politician Lucius Annaeus Seneca. The group includes Hercules Furens, Medea, Troades, Phaedra, Agamemnon, Oedipus, Phoenissae, Thyestes, Hercules Oetaeus, and Octavi ... Read »


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    • She-tragedy

    • The term she-tragedy, also known as "pathetic tragedy" refers to a vogue in the late 17th and early 18th centuries for tragic plays focused on the sufferings of a woman, sometimes innocent and virtuous but often a woman who has committed some sort of sexual sin. Prominent she-tragedies include Thomas Otway's The Orphan ... Read »


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    • Sock and buskin

    • The sock and buskin are two ancient symbols of comedy and tragedy. In Greek theatre, actors in tragic roles wore a boot called a buskin (Latin cothurnus) that elevated them above the other actors. The actors with comedic roles only wore a thin soled shoe called a sock (Latin soccus). Melpomene, the muse of tragedy, is ... Read »


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    • Stichomythia

    • Stichomythia (Greek: Στιχομυθία) is a technique in verse drama in which sequences of single alternating lines, or half-lines (hemistichomythia) or two-line speeches (distichomythia) are given to alternating characters. It typically features repetition and antithesis. The term originated in ... Read »


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    • Talent show

    • A talent show is an event where participants perform talents of singing, dancing, acrobatics, acting, drumming, martial arts, playing an instrument, or other activities to showcase skills. Many talent shows are performances rather than contests, but some are actual contests. In the instance of a contest, participants m ... Read »


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    • Teichoscopy

    • Teichoscopy or teichoscopia, meaning "viewing from the walls," is a recurring narrative strategy in ancient Greek literature. One famous instance of teichoscopy occurs in Homer's Iliad, Book 3, lines 121-244. The passage begins with Helen approached in her chamber by Iris, disguised as her sister-in-law Laodice, the d ... Read »


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    • Theatrical style

    • There are four basic theatrical forms either defined, implied, or derived by or from Aristotle: Tragedy; Comedy; Melodrama; and Drama. Any number of styles can be used to convey these forms. A good working definition of, "Style", is how something is done. Theatrical styles are influenced by their time and place, artis ... Read »


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    • The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations

    • The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations is a descriptive list which was created by Georges Polti to categorize every dramatic situation that might occur in a story or performance. To do this Polti analyzed classical Greek texts, plus classical and contemporaneous French works. He also analyzed a handful of non-French author ... Read »


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    • Throwaway line

    • In comedy, a throwaway line (also: throwaway joke or throwaway gag) is a joke delivered "in passing" without being the punch line to a comedy routine, part of the to another joke, or (in the context of drama) there to advance a story or develop a character. Throwaway lines are often one-liners, or in-jokes, and often ... Read »


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    • Tom show

    • Tom show is a general term for any play or musical based (often only loosely) on the 1852 novel Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe. The novel attempts to depict the harsh reality of slavery. Due to the weak copyright laws at the time, a number of unauthorized plays based on the novel were staged for decades, ma ... Read »


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    • Travesti (theatre)

    • Travesti (literally "disguised") is a theatrical term referring to the portrayal of a character in an opera, play, or ballet by a performer of the opposite sex. Some sources regard 'travesti' as an Italian term, some as French. Depending on sources, the term may be given as travesty,travesti, or en travesti. The Oxford ... Read »


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    • Trial film

    • Trial films is a film genre, also commonly referred to as courtroom drama. In 1989, the American Bar Association rated the twelve best trial films of all time, and provided a detailed and reasoned legal evaluation for its choices. Ten of them are in English; M is in German and The Passion of Joan of Arc is a Frenc ... Read »


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    • Tritagonist

    • In literature, the tritagonist or tertiary main character (from Ancient Greek: τριταγωνιστής, tritagōnistḗs, third actor) is the third most important character of a narrative, after the protagonist and deuteragonist. In ancient Greek drama, the tritagonist was the third ... Read »


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    • Two-hander

    • A two-hander is a term for a play, film, or television programme with only two main characters. The two characters in question often display differences in social standing or experiences, differences that are explored and possibly overcome as the story unfolds. ... Read »


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    • Verse drama and dramatic verse

    • Verse drama is any drama written as verse to be spoken; another possible general term is poetic drama. For a very long period, verse drama was the dominant form of drama in Europe (and was also important in non-European cultures). Greek tragedy and Racine's plays are written in verse, as is almost all of Shakespeare's ... Read »


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    • Well-made play

    • The well-made play (French: la pièce bien faite, pronounced [pjɛs bjɛ̃ fɛt]) is a dramatic genre from nineteenth-century theatre that French dramatist Eugène Scribe first codified. Dramatists Victorien Sardou, Alexandre Dumas, fils, and Emile Augier wrote within the genre, each putting a distinct spin ... Read »


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