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    • -oate

    • The suffix -oate is the IUPAC nomenclature used in organic chemistry to form names of compounds formed from carboxylic acids. They are of two types: The suffix is derived from "-oic acid". The most common example of compounds with sufix "oate" are Ester which contain organic compounds with suffix "oate". Example - Et ... Read »


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    • 'Asma' bint Marwan


    • `Abdu'l-Bahá's journeys to the West


    • 4Q120

    • The manuscript 4Q120 (also pap4QLXXLevb) is a Septuagint manuscript (LXX) of the biblical Book of Leviticus. The Rahlfs-No. is 802. Palaoegraphycally is dating from the first century BCE. Currently the manuscript is housed in the Rockefeller Museum in Jerusalem. This scroll is in a very fragmented condition. Today it ... Read »


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    • 6th Army (Wehrmacht)

    • 6th Army (Wehrmacht)

      World War II The 6th Army was a field army unit of the German Wehrmacht during World War II. The 6th Army is still widely remembered for its destruction by the Red Army at the Battle of Stalingrad in the winter of 1942/43. It is also infamous for the war crimes (such as the massacre of more than 30,000 Jews at Babi Ya ... Read »


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    • 7th Battalion (Australia)

    • 7th Battalion (Australia)

      First World War Second World War The 7th Battalion was an infantry battalion of the Australian Army. Raised in 1914 as part of the Australian Imperial Force during the First World War, the battalion was completely recruited from the state of Victoria and formed the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division. The battalion served duri ... Read »


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    • 13 May Incident

    • Declaration of national emergency. The 13 May 1969 incident refers to the Sino-Malay sectarian violence in Kuala Lumpur (then part of the state of Selangor), Malaysia. The riot occurred in the aftermath of the 1969 Malaysian general election when opposition parties made gains at the expense of the ruling coalition, th ... Read »


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    • 15th Battalion (Australia)

    • 15th Battalion (Australia)

      First World War Second World War The 15th Battalion was an infantry battalion of the Australian Army. Formed in 1914 as part of the all-volunteer Australian Imperial Force from Queensland and Tasmanian recruits, the battalion fought during the Gallipoli Campaign and on the Western Front during the First World War. It ... Read »


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    • XXI Corps (United Kingdom)

    • XXI Corps (United Kingdom)

      World War I The XXI Corps was an Army Corps of the British Army during World War I. The Corps was formed in Egypt in June 1917 under the command of Lieutenant General Edward Bulfin. It formed part of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF), that served in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. The Corps was formed as f ... Read »


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    • 26th Battalion (Australia)

    • 26th Battalion (Australia)

      World War I World War II The 26th Battalion was an infantry battalion of the Australian Army. Originally raised in April 1915 for service in World War I as part of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF), it was assigned to the 7th Brigade and consisted of personnel recruited from the states of Queensland and Tasmania. T ... Read »


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    • 31st Test and Evaluation Squadron

    • 31st Test and Evaluation Squadron

      The 31st Test and Evaluation Squadron (31 TES) is a United States Air Force unit, assigned to the 53d Test and Evaluation Group, stationed at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The 31 TES is an Air Combat Command (ACC) tenant unit at Edwards, providing personnel to support combined test and evaluation on Air Force wea ... Read »


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    • 32 Poems

    • 32 Poems Magazine (32 Poems) is a literary magazine, founded in the American states of Maryland and Texas in 2003, that has published poems from writers around the world. This independent magazine, founded by Deborah Ager and John Poch, made its debut at the 2003 Associated Writing Programs Conference in Baltimore ... Read »


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    • 122nd New York Volunteer Infantry

    • 122nd New York Volunteer Infantry

      American Civil War The 122nd New York Volunteer Infantry known as the "Onondagas", was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. A year into the American Civil War, additional troops were being raised in Onondaga County, New York. The county was named for the Onondaga people who lived ... Read »


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    • 360s

    • ... Read »


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    • 361

    • Year 361 (CCCLXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Taurus and Florentius (or, less frequently, year 1114 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 361 for this year has been used since the early medieva ... Read »


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    • 660s

    • ... Read »


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    • 665

    • Year 665 (DCLXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 665 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. ... Read »


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    • 1490s

    • ... Read »


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    • 1494 in Ireland

    • 1494 in Ireland

      Events from the year 1494 in Ireland. ... Read »


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    • 1495

    • Year 1495 (MCDXCV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... Read »


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    • 1495 in Ireland

    • 1495 in Ireland

      Events from the year 1495 in Ireland. ... Read »


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    • 1540s

    • ... Read »


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    • 1540s in England

    • 1540s in England

      Events from the 1540s in England. Monarch – Henry VIII (to 28 January 1547), Edward VI ... Read »


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    • 1549

    • Year 1549 (MDXLIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. In the Kingdom of England, it was known as "The Year of the Many-Headed Monster", because of the unusually high number of rebellions which occurred in the country. ... Read »


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    • 1590s in England

    • 1590s in England

      Events from the 1590s in England. Monarch – Elizabeth I ... Read »


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    • 1662 in Ireland

    • 1662 in Ireland

      Events from the year 1662 in Ireland. ... Read »


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    • 1759 in Ireland

    • 1759 in Ireland

      Events from the year 1759 in Ireland. ... Read »


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    • 1780s

    • . Jean-Auguste-Dominique-Ingres 1780 Template:1780 Jean-August-Dominique-Ingres. Born 1780-1867. Template:1867 Template:A neoclassical artist whom said of himself to be a painter of historical events. ... Read »


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    • 1782

    • 1782 (MDCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (dominical letter F) of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday (dominical letter B) of the Julian calendar, the 1782nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 782nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 82nd year o ... Read »


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    • 1782 in Great Britain

    • 1782 in Great Britain

      Events from the year 1782 in the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Read »


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    • 1782 in Ireland

    • 1782 in Ireland

      Events from the year 1782 in Ireland. ... Read »


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    • 1795–1820 in Western fashion


    • 1802 in science

    • The year 1802 in science and technology involved some significant events, listed below. ... Read »


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    • 1857 in Switzerland

    • 1857 in Switzerland

      The following is a list of events, births, and deaths in 1857 in Switzerland. ... Read »


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    • 1877 in paleontology

    • Paleontology or palaeontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), pa ... Read »


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    • 1878 in paleontology

    • Paleontology or palaeontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), pa ... Read »


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    • 1905 Russian Revolution

    • 1905 Russian Revolution

      Imperial Government victory Imperial Government Supported by: Revolutionaries Supported by: The Russian Revolution of 1905 was a wave of mass political and social unrest that spread through vast areas of the Russian Empire, some of which was directed at the government. It included worker strikes, peasant unrest, a ... Read »


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    • 1906 in Ireland

    • 1906 in Ireland

      Events from the year 1906 in Ireland. ... Read »


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    • 1920 FA Cup Final

    • The 1920 FA Cup Final, the first since the end of the First World War, was contested by Aston Villa and Huddersfield at Stamford Bridge. Aston Villa won 1–0, with the goal coming in extra time from Billy Kirton, to clinch the trophy for a record sixth time. This was the first ever F.A. Cup Final to require extra t ... Read »


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    • 1923 Great Kantō earthquake


    • 1940s

    • The 1940s (pronounced "nineteen-forties" and commonly abbreviated as the "Forties") was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1940, and ended on December 31, 1949. Most of World War II took place in the first half of the decade, which had a profound effect on most countries and people in Euro ... Read »


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    • 1948 Bermuda–Newfoundland hurricane


    • 1951 in Wales

    • 1951 in Wales

      This article is about the particular significance of the year 1951 to Wales and its people. ... Read »


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    • 1960s

    • The 1960s (pronounced "nineteen-sixties") was a decade that began on January 1, 1960, and ended on December 31, 1969. The term "1960s" also refers to an era more often called the Sixties, denoting the complex of inter-related cultural and political trends around the globe. This "cultural decade" is more loosely defined ... Read »


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    • 1970 Houston Women's Invitation


    • 1991 Census of India

    • The 1991 Census of India was the 13th in a series of censuses held in India every decade since 1871. The population of India was counted as 838,583,988. The number of enumerators was 1.6 million. Hindus comprises 69.01 crore(81.53%) and Muslims were 10.67 crore(12.61%) in 1991 census. The 1991 census recognizes ... Read »


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    • 1993 Atlantic hurricane season

    • 1993 Atlantic hurricane season

      The 1993 Atlantic hurricane season was a below average Atlantic hurricane season that produced ten tropical cyclones and tropical storms, four hurricanes, and one major hurricane. It officially started on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyc ... Read »


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    • 1993 Klamath Falls earthquakes

    • 1993 Klamath Falls earthquakes

      The 1993 Klamath Falls earthquakes took place in Klamath Falls, Oregon, beginning on Monday, 20 September at 8:28 p.m. The doublet earthquake registered respective magnitudes of 6.0 and 5.9 on the moment magnitude scale. The earthquakes were located at a depth of 5.6 miles (9 km) and tremors continued to be felt ... Read »


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    • 2002 Gujarat riots

    • 2002 Gujarat riots

      The 2002 Gujarat riots, also known as the 2002 Gujarat violence and the Gujarat pogrom, was a three-day period of inter-communal violence in the western Indian state of Gujarat. Following the initial incident there were further outbreaks of violence in Ahmedabad for three weeks; statewide, there were further outbreaks ... Read »


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    • 2009 Malagasy political crisis

    • 2009 Malagasy political crisis

      The 2009 Malagasy political crisis began on 26 January 2009 with the political opposition movement led by Antananarivo mayor Andry Rajoelina, which sought to oust President Marc Ravalomanana from the presidency. The crisis reached its climax on 21 March 2009 when Andry Rajoelina was declared the president of the High T ... Read »


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    • 2010 in archosaur paleontology

    • The year 2010 in Archosaur paleontology was eventful. Archosaurs include the only living dinosaur group — birds — and the reptile crocodilians, plus all extinct dinosaurs, extinct crocodilian relatives, and pterosaurs. Archosaur palaeontology is the scientific study of those animals, especially as they existe ... Read »


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    • 2011 in archosaur paleontology

    • The year 2011 in Archosaur paleontology was eventful. Archosaurs include the only living dinosaur group — birds — and the reptile crocodilians, plus all extinct dinosaurs, extinct crocodilian relatives, and pterosaurs. Archosaur palaeontology is the scientific study of those animals, especially as they existe ... Read »


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    • A Dream (Blake)

    • "A Dream" is a poem by English poet William Blake. The poem was first published in 1789 as part of Blake's collection of poems entitled Songs of Innocence. Songs of Innocence is a collection of 19 illustrated poems published in 1789. According to scholar Donald A. Dike, the collection does not “describe an ab ... Read »


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    • A Latin Dictionary

    • A Latin Dictionary (or Harpers' Latin Dictionary, often referred to as Lewis and Short or L&S) is a popular English-language lexicographical work of the Latin language, published by Harper and Brothers of New York in 1879 and printed simultaneously in the United Kingdom by Oxford University Press. The work is usua ... Read »


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    • A Letter to a Hindu

    • "A Letter to a Hindu" (also known as "A Letter to a Hindoo") was a letter written by Leo Tolstoy to Tarak Nath Das on 14 December 1908. The letter was written in response to two letters sent by Das, seeking support from the famous Russian author and thinker for India's independence from British colonial rule. The lette ... Read »


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    • A. J. Hackett

    • Alan John "A. J." Hackett (born May 1958) is a New Zealand entrepreneur who popularised the extreme sport of bungy jumping. He made the famous bungy jump from the Eiffel Tower in 1987 and founded the first commercial bungy site in 1988. Hackett was born in Pukekohe, growing up on Auckland's North Shore. He attende ... Read »


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    • A86 (software)

    • A86 is computer software, a compact commercial assembler developed for the Intel x86 family of microprocessors by Eric Isaacson. It was first made available as shareware in the 1980s. The assembler is contained in one 32K executable and can directly produce an MS-DOS compatible COM file or an object file for use with ... Read »


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    • Aaata (sponge)

    • The genus name Aaata has been described as a synonym to two species in the Microcionidae family of sea sponges (Demospongiae). The two species being: The above are synonyms for Clathria brepha and Clathria spongigartina respectively (de Laubenfels, 1930). The two later names are now the currently accepted definitions ... Read »


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    • Aarhus University

    • Aarhus University

      Aarhus University (Danish: Aarhus Universitet, abbreviated AU) is a prestigious public university located in Aarhus, Denmark. Founded in 1928, it is Denmark's second oldest university and the largest, with a total of 44,500 enrolled students as of 1 January 2013, after a merger with Aarhus School of Engineering. In mos ... Read »


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    • Abandoned village

    • An abandoned village is a village that has, for some reason, been deserted. In many countries, and throughout history, thousands of villages have been deserted for a variety of causes. Abandonment of villages is often related to epidemic, famine, war, climate change, environmental destruction, or deliberate clearances. ... Read »


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    • Abatus philippii

    • Abatus philippii is a species of sea urchin of the family Schizasteridae. Their armour is covered with spines. It came from the genus Abatus and lives in the oceans of the southern hemisphere. Abatus philippii was first scientifically described in 1871 by Lovén. ... Read »


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    • Abbots Ripton

    • Abbots Ripton

      Abbots Ripton is a village and civil parish in Cambridgeshire, England. Abbots Ripton is situated within Huntingdonshire which is a non-metropolitan district of Cambridgeshire as well as being an historic county of England. Abbots Ripton lies approximately 4 miles (6 km) north of Huntingdon on the B1090. The parish ... Read »


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    • Abdullah el-Faisal

    • Abdullah el-Faisal (born Trevor William Forrest, also known as Abdullah al-Faisal, Sheikh Faisal, Sheik Faisal, and Imam Al-Jamaikee, born 10 September 1963) is a Muslim cleric who preached in the United Kingdom until he was convicted of stirring up racial hatred and urging his followers to murder Jews, Hindus, Christi ... Read »


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    • Aberdare

    • Aberdare

      Aberdare (/ˌæbərˈdɛər/ ab-ər-DAIR;Welsh: Aberdâr) is a town in the Cynon Valley area of Rhondda Cynon Taf, Wales, at the confluence of the Rivers Dare (Dâr) and Cynon. The population at the 2001 census was 31,705 (ranked 13th largest in Wales). Aberdare is 4 miles (6 km) south-west of Mert ... Read »


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    • Abingdon (plantation)

    • Abingdon (plantation)

      Abingdon (also known as the Alexander-Custis Plantation) was an 18th- and 19th-century plantation that the prominent Alexander, Custis, Stuart, and Hunter families owned. The plantation's site is now located in Arlington County in the U.S. state of Virginia. Abingdon is known as the birthplace of Eleanor "Nelly" Parke ... Read »


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    • Abna' al-dawla


    • Abortion

    • Abortion is the ending of pregnancy by removing a fetus or embryo before it can survive outside the uterus. An abortion which occurs spontaneously is also known as a miscarriage. An abortion may be caused purposely and is then called an induced abortion, or less frequently, "induced miscarriage". The word abortion is o ... Read »


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    • Abortion and the Catholic Church

    • The Catholic Church opposes all forms of abortion procedures whose direct purpose is to destroy an embryo, blastocyst, zygote or fetus, since it holds that "human life must be respected and protected absolutely from the moment of conception. From the first moment of his existence, a human being must be recognized as ha ... Read »


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    • Abraham Firkovich

    • Abraham (Avraham) ben Samuel Firkovich (Hebrew אברהם בן שמואל - Avraham ben Shmuel; Karayce: Аврагъам Фиркович - Avragham Firkovich) (1786–1874) was a famous Karaite writer and archeologist, collector of ancient manuscripts, and a ... Read »


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    • Abralia multihamata

    • Abralia multihamata

      Abralia multihamata is a species of enoploteuthid cephalopod native to the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Specificaly, it occurs in the East China Sea, Sea of Japan and Sagami Bay. The taxonomic relationship between A. multihamata and A. spaercki needs to be resolved. It may spawn in the East China Sea, as large numbers of s ... Read »


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    • Morton I. Abramowitz

    • Morton I. Abramowitz

      Morton Isaac Abramowitz (born January 20, 1933) is an American diplomat and former State Department official. Among other roles he served as US Ambassador to Thailand 1978 to 1981, Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence and Research 1985 to 1989, and US Ambassador to Turkey 1989 to 1991. After retiring from the ... Read »


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    • Elliott Abrams

    • Elliott Abrams

      Elliott Abrams (born January 24, 1948) is a former American diplomat, lawyer and political scientist who served in foreign policy positions for Presidents Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush. Abrams was convicted of withholding information from Congress about the Iran–Contra affair while serving under Reagan, but was ... Read »


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    • Abu al-Hakam al-Kirmani

    • Abu al-Hakam al-Kirmani (Arabic: أبو الحكم الكرماني‎; d. 1066 CE) was a prominent philosopher and scholar from the Muslim al-Andalus. A student of Maslamah Ibn Ahmad al-Majriti, he was a Neoplatonic advocate, and seen as an influence on Ibn 'Arabi, but he also wrote ... Read »


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    • Battle of Abu Tellul

    • Battle of Abu Tellul

      The Battle of Abu Tellul (called the Affair of Abu Tellul by the British Battles Nomenclature Committee) was fought on 14 July 1918 during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I after German and Ottoman Empire forces attacked the British Empire garrison in the Jordan Valley. The valley had been occupied by the ... Read »


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    • Abu'l-A'war


    • Abui language

    • Abui is a non-Austronesian language of the Alor Archipelago. It is spoken in the central part of Alor Island in Eastern Indonesia, East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) province by the Abui people. The native name in the Takalelang dialect is Abui tanga which literally translates as 'mountain language'. Abui is a member of the ... Read »


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    • Abyssal hill

    • An abyssal hill is a small hill that rises from the floor of an abyssal plain. They are the most abundant geomorphic structures on the planet Earth, covering more than 30% of the ocean floors. Abyssal hills have relatively sharply defined edges and climb to heights of no more than a few hundred meters. They can be from ... Read »


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    • Academic dishonesty

    • Academic dishonesty, academic misconduct or academic fraud is any type of cheating that occurs in relation to a formal academic exercise. It can include Academic dishonesty has been documented in every type of educational setting from elementary school to graduate school. Throughout history this type of dishonesty has ... Read »


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    • Acallosuchus

    • Acallosuchus (meaning "ugly crocodile" in Greek) is an extinct genus of reptile from the Triassic Chinle Formation of the southwestern United States. Although it was discovered in 1923, Acallosuchus was not described until 1989, when the type species A. rectori was named. The taxonomy classification of Acallosuchus is ... Read »


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    • Acanthochondria

    • Acanthochondria

      Acanthochondria is a genus of copepods, containing the following species: Several species inquirendae are also assigned to the genus: ... Read »


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    • Acanthochondria limandae

    • Acanthochondria limandae

      Chondracanthus limandae Krøyer, 1863 Acanthochondria limandae is a species of copepods in the genus Acanthochondria. They are host-specific ectoparasites of two species of flatfish: the common dab (Limanda limanda) and the European flounder (Platichthys flesus). They attach themselves to the bases of the gill arche ... Read »


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    • Acanthotetilla

    • Acanthotetilla is a genus of demosponges belonging to the family Tetillidae. They are distinguished from others in the family by the presence of distinctive, heavily spined skeletal structures called "megacanthoxeas". There are five described species: four occur in the Indian Ocean with one from the Atlantic, Acanthote ... Read »


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    • Acartia

    • Acartia

      Acartia is a genus of marine calanoid copepods. They are epipelagic, estuarine, zooplanktonic found throughout the oceans of the world, primarily in temperate regions. Species This genus contains the majority of species in the family Acartiidae: Reproductive and Life Cycle Female Acartia release eggs freely in the ... Read »


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    • Acartia lefevreae

    • Acartia lefevreae is a species of copepod belonging to the family Acartiidae. This species was discovered when specimens previously identified as Acartia clausi were examined and found to belong to a separate species. Its range overlaps with that of A. clausi, being found in the western Mediterranean and the north east ... Read »


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    • Accessibility

    • Accessibility refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people who experience disabilities. The concept of accessible design and practice of accessible development ensures both "direct access" (i.e. unassisted) and "indirect access" meaning compatibility with a person's assistive technolo ... Read »


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    • Benedetto Accolti the Elder

    • Benedetto Accolti (1415 in Arezzo – 26 September 1464 in Florence) was an Italian jurist, humanist and historian. He was born at Arezzo in Tuscany, of a prominent family, several members of which were distinguished like himself for their attainments in law. He was for some time professor of law in the Univers ... Read »


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    • Acehnese language

    • Acehnese language

      Acehnese language (Achinese) is a Malayo-Polynesian language spoken by Acehnese people natively in Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia. This language is also spoken in some parts of Malaysia by Acehnese descendents there, such as in Yan, Kedah. As of 1988, "Acehnese" is the modern English name spelling and the bibliographica ... Read »


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    • Achang language

    • The Achang language (autonym: ŋa˨˩tʂhaŋ˨˩; Chinese: 阿昌) is a Tibeto-Burman language spoken by the Achang (a.k.a. Maingtha) in China. Also called Ngochang. Achang is spoken in the following locations (阿昌语简志). The Xiandao 仙岛 dialect (100 speakers; au ... Read »


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    • Achawa language

    • Achagua (Achawa) is a language spoken in the Meta Department of Colombia, similar to Piapoco. It is estimated that 250 individuals speak the language, many of whom also speak Piapoco or Spanish. "Achagua is a language of the Maipurean Arawakan group traditionally spoken by the Achagua people of Venezuela and east-cent ... Read »


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    • Acheron

    • Acheron

      The Acheron (/ˈækərən/; Ancient Greek: Ἀχέρων (Acheron) or Ἀχερούσιος (Acherusius); Modern Greek: Αχέροντας (Acherontas)) is a river located in the Epirus region of northwest Greece. Its source is near the village Zotiko, in t ... Read »


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    • Acholi dialect

    • Acoli (also Acholi, Akoli, Acooli, Atscholi, Shuli, Gang, Lwoo, Lwo, Lok Acoli, Dok Acoli) is a Southern Luo dialect spoken by the Acholi people in the districts of Gulu, Kitgum and Pader (a region known as Acholiland) in northern Uganda. It is also spoken in southern Sudan in Magwi County Eastern Equatoria states Son ... Read »


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    • Achumawi language

    • The Achumawi language (also Achomawi or Pit River language) is the native language spoken by the Pit River people of present-day California. The term Achumawi is an anglicization of the name of the Fall River band, ajúmmááwí, from ajúmmá "river". Originally there were nine bands, with dialect differen ... Read »


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    • Acidiscus

    • Acidiscus

      Acidiscus is an extinct genus of eodiscinid agnostid trilobites. It lived during the Botomian stage of the Cambrian period. A. birdi is named for Dr. John M. Bird who collected the holotype.A. hexacanthus is derived from the Greek hexa "six" and acanthos "spine", for having two pairs of border spines in addition t ... Read »


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    • Acompsosaurus

    • Acompsosaurus

      Acompsosaurus is an extinct genus of aetosaur. It is known from a partial skeleton found from the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation near Fort Wingate, New Mexico, which is now lost. The generic name means "sturdy lizard." It may be a junior synonym of Stagonolepis as its pelvis closely resembles that of S ... Read »


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    • Aconchulinida

    • Vampyrellidae Aconchulinida is an order of Cercozoa in the sub-class Filosia. The outer zone is clear ectoplasm and has many vacuoles. It has a single nucleus. Its size range from 10 to 400 micrometers. ... Read »


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    • Acritarch

    • Acritarch

      Acritarchs are organic microfossils, present from approximately 1,400 to 3,200 million years ago to the present. Their diversity reflects major ecological events such as the appearance of predation and the Cambrian explosion. In general, any small, non-acid soluble (i.e. non-carbonate, non-siliceous) organic ... Read »


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    • Acrochaetiales

    • Acrochaetiales is an order of red algae. It contains the family Acrochaetiaceae. ... Read »


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    • Acupuncture

    • Acupuncture

      Acupuncture is a form of alternative medicine in which thin needles are inserted into the body. It is a key component of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). TCM theory and practice are not based upon scientific knowledge, and acupuncture is a pseudoscience. There is a diverse range of acupuncture theories based on diff ... Read »


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    • Ada (name)

    • Ada (name)

      Ada is a feminine given name. One source indicates it originates from a Germanic word meaning "nobility". It can also be a short form of names such as Adelaide and Adeline. The name also traces to Hebrew origin, sometimes spelt Adah - עָדָה, meaning "adornment". The name has seen a slight increase in po ... Read »


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    • Ada Katz

    • Ada Del Moro Katz (born 1928 in Bronx, New York) is the wife and model of Alex Katz. She graduated from Brooklyn College with a BS in 1950. She studied at the University of Maryland, and graduated from New York University with an MS in biology in 1955. She worked at Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center. She was ... Read »


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    • Ada Williams (actress)

    • Ada Williams (actress)

      Ada Williams (June 2, 1913–August 12, 1975) was an American film actress. She was the daughter of Calvin Williams of Knoxville, Kentucky. In 1927, she won the Miss Florida beauty contest, and became first runner-up in the Miss United States contest. Her film career began with a role was in Joy Street (1929) for t ... Read »


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    • Adada, Pisidia

    • Adada

      Adada is an ancient city and archaeological site in Pisidia, north of Selge and east of Kestros River, near the village of Sağrak, in Isparta Province’s Sütçüler township. The location was identified as Karabavullu or Karabavli, about 35 km south of Lake Egridir. The earliest evidence in ancien ... Read »


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    • John Quincy Adams

    • John Quincy Adams

      John Quincy Adams (i/ˈkwɪnzi/; July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American statesman who served as the sixth President of the United States from 1825 to 1829. He also served as a diplomat, a Senator and member of the House of Representatives. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republic ... Read »


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    • Antoine Samuel Adam-Salomon

    • Antoine Samuel Adam-Salomon

      Antoine Samuel Adam-Salomon (9 January 1818 – 28 April 1881 ) was a French sculptor and photographer. Antoine Samuel Adam-Salomon was born to a French Jewish family on 9 January 1818 in La Ferté-sous-Jouarre, Seine-et-Marne, France. Following a brief career as a modeler for the Jacob Petit pottery factory ... Read »


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    • Adamussium

    • Adamussium

      Adamussium is a monotypic genus of bivalve molluscs in the large family of scallops, the Pectinidae. The Antarctic scallop (Adamussium colbecki) is the only species in the genus though its exact relationship to other members of the family is unclear. It is found in the ice-cold seas surrounding Antarctica, sometimes at ... Read »


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    • Adaptive management

    • Adaptive management (AM), also known as adaptive resource management (ARM) or adaptive environmental assessment and management (AEAM), is a structured, iterative process of robust decision making in the face of uncertainty, with an aim to reducing uncertainty over time via system monitoring. In this way, decision makin ... Read »


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    • Adasaurus

    • Adasaurus

      Adasaurus (/ˌɑːdəˈsɔːrəs/ AH-də-SAWR-əs; "Ada's lizard") is a dromaeosaurid theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous Period of Central Asia. It was a small bipedal carnivore with a sickle-shaped claw on the second toe of each hind foot, and was perhaps 1.8 m (5.9 ft) long. The genu ... Read »


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    • Additive synthesis

    • Additive synthesis is a sound synthesis technique that creates timbre by adding sine waves together. The timbre of musical instruments can be considered in the light of Fourier theory to consist of multiple harmonic or inharmonic partials or overtones. Each partial is a sine wave of different frequency and amplitude t ... Read »


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    • Kim Addonizio

    • Kim Addonizio (born Kim Addie, July 31, 1954 Washington, D.C., United States) is an American poet and novelist. Addonizio is the daughter of tennis champion Pauline Betz and sports writer Bob Addie. She briefly attended Georgetown University and American University before dropping out of both. She later moved to ... Read »


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    • Adelaide city centre

    • Adelaide city centre

      Coordinates: 34°55′44″S 138°36′04″E / 34.929°S 138.601°E / -34.929; 138.601 Adelaide city centre is the innermost locality of Greater Adelaide, the capital city of South Australia. It is known by locals simply as "The City" or "Town" to distinguish it from Greater Adel ... Read »


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    • Adelaide Street Court House

    • The Adelaide Street Court House, or York County Court House, is a historic former courthouse located at 57 Adelaide Street East in the St. Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It served as a court house from 1852 until 1900. It currently houses Terroni restaurant. It was designed by the firm of Cumberla ... Read »


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    • Adenovirus genome

    • Adenovirus genomes are linear, non-segmented double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules that are typically 26-46 Kbp long, containing 23-46 protein-coding genes. The example used for the following description is Human adenovirus E, a mastadenovirus with a 36 Kbp genome containing 38 protein-coding genes. While the precise numb ... Read »


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    • Elisabeth von Adlerflycht

    • Susanna Maria Rebecca Elisabeth von Adlerflycht (born von Riese; September 23, 1775 – March 15, 1846) was a German painter known for her cartographic illustration of the Rhine Valley, the first in a genre of tourist maps known as . Elisabeth von Adlerflycht studied in Frankfurt under Johann Daniel Bager (1754†... Read »


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    • Adon

    • Adon literally means "lord." Adon has an uncertain etymology, although it is generally believed to be derived from the Ugaritic ad, “father.” The pluralization of Adoni "my lord" is Adonai "my lords."Otto Eissfeldt theorizes that Adonai is a post positive element attested to in Ugaritic writing. He point ... Read »


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    • Adonis cyllenea

    • Adonis cyllenea is a member of the family Ranunculaceae. The genus Adonis contain approximately 35 different species located in areas of the world such as North America, Eurasia, Europe and North Africa. Adonis cyllenea is one of hundreds of rare plants that have been removed from Greek mountain sides. Adjacent to ... Read »


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    • Adranon

    • Adranon

      Adranon (present day Adrano) is ancient polis and archaeological site on the southwestern slopes of Mount Etna, near Simeto River, known for the "simetite" variety of amber" northwest of Catania. The ancient city was founded by the ancient Greek ruler Dionysius I of Syracuse around 400 BCE upon a pre-Hellenic neolithic ... Read »


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    • Adrenergic cell groups

    • Adrenergic cell groups refers to collections of neurons in the central nervous system that stain for PNMT, the enzyme that converts norepinephrine to epinephrine (adrenaline). Thus, it is postulated that the neurotransmitter they produce may be epinephrine (adrenaline). Located in the medulla, they are named adrenergic ... Read »


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    • Adrenocortical carcinoma

    • Adrenocortical carcinoma

      Adrenocortical carcinoma, also adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC) and adrenal cortex cancer, is an aggressive cancer originating in the cortex (steroid hormone-producing tissue) of the adrenal gland. Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare tumor, with incidence of 1–2 per million population annually. Adrenocortical carci ... Read »


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    • Adrián Gómez González


    • Adrian Matejka

    • Adrian Matejka (born in Nuremberg, Germany) is an African-American poet. He graduated from Southern Illinois University Carbondale with an MFA in Creative Writing. He has received fellowships from the Cave Canem Workshop, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, and United States Artists. His most recent book ... Read »


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    • Adrian Stokes (courtier)

    • Adrian Stokes (4 March 1519 – 30 November 1586) was an English courtier and politician. Stokes was Master of the Horse to Frances Grey, Duchess of Suffolk and married her after the execution of her first husband, Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, on 1 March 1555. They had three children, all of whom died in infanc ... Read »


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    • Aega psora

    • Aega psora

      Aega psora is a species of isopod crustacean that parasitises a number of fish species in the North Atlantic. It is a serious ectoparasite of larger species of fish, particularly when they are injured. Aega psora is the type species of the genus Aega and was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. It reaches 15 ... Read »


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    • Aegidae

    • The Aegidae are a family of isopod crustaceans. The adults are temporary parasites of fish, feeding on their hosts' blood before dropping off to digest the meal. They differ from members of the family Cirolanidae in having only three pairs of hook-like pereiopods, whereas in Cirolanidae all seven pairs of pereiopods ar ... Read »


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    • Aegimius (poem)

    • The Aegimius (Ancient Greek: Αἰγίμιος, Aigimios) is a fragmentary Ancient Greek epic poem that was variously attributed to Hesiod or Cercops of Miletus during antiquity. The "Aegimius" of the title was surely the son of Dorus, but the surviving fragments have nothing to do directly with thi ... Read »


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    • Ælfflæd, wife of Edward the Elder


    • Ælfweard of Wessex


    • Aequoreidae

    • Aequoreidae

      Aequoreidae is a hydrozoan family. There are approximately 30 known species found in temperate and tropical marine coastal environments. Aequoreids include Aequorea victoria, the organism from which the green fluorescent protein gene was isolated. Only the polyp stages of Aequorea species have been observed. The c ... Read »


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    • Æthelstan


    • Aetosaur

    • Aetosaur

      Aetosaurs (aetosaur /eɪˌɛtoʊˈsɔːr/; order name Aetosauria /eɪˌɛtoʊˈsɔːriə/; from Greek, (aetos, "eagle") and (sauros, "lizard")) are an extinct order of heavily armoured, medium- to large-sized Late Triassic herbivorous archosaurs. They have small heads, upturned snouts, e ... Read »


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    • Afghans in Iran

    • Afghans in Iran are mostly refugees who have fled wars in Afghanistan since the April 1978 Saur Revolution in Kabul. It also includes an unknown number of illegal migrant workers as well as a smaller number of traders, exchanged students, diplomats, and tourists. According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Re ... Read »


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    • Afonso I of Portugal

    • Afonso I of Portugal

      Afonso I (25 July 1109 – 6 December 1185), nicknamed "the Conqueror" (Portuguese: O Conquistador), "the Founder" (O Fundador) or "the Great" (O Grande) by the Portuguese, and El-Bortukali [in Arabic البرتغال] ("the Portuguese") and Ibn-Arrik [in Arabic ابن الرَّ٠... Read »


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    • African American Vernacular English

    • African American Vernacular English (AAVE)—also called African American English (AAE); less precisely Black English, Black Vernacular, Black English Vernacular (BEV), or Black Vernacular English (BVE),—is a variety (dialect, ethnolect and sociolect) of American English, culturally spoken by urban working-clas ... Read »


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    • African-American history

    • African-American history is the branch of American history that specifically discusses the African-American or Black American ethnic groups in the United States. Most African Americans are the descendants of Africans forcibly brought to and held captive in the United States from 1555 to 1865. Blacks from the Caribbean ... Read »


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    • Afrikaners

    • Afrikaners

      Afrikaners are a Southern African ethnic group descended from predominantly Dutch settlers first arriving in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. They traditionally dominated South Africa's agriculture and politics prior to 1994.Afrikaans, South Africa's third most widely spoken home language, is the mother tongue ... Read »


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    • Afrocyclops gibsoni

    • Afrocyclops gibsoni is a species of copepod in the family Cyclopidae. Three subspecies have been identified: ... Read »


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    • Agar

    • Agar (pronounced /ˈeɪɡɑːr/, US /ˈɑːɡər/) or agar-agar is a jelly-like substance, obtained from algae. It was discovered in the late 1650s or early 1660s by Mino Tarōzaemon in Japan, where it is called kanten. Agar is derived from the polysaccharide agarose, which forms the supporting s ... Read »


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    • Agarose

    • An agarose is a polysaccharide polymer material, generally extracted from seaweed. Agarose is a linear polymer made up of the repeating unit of agarobiose, which is a disaccharide made up of D-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-L-galactopyranose. Agarose is one of the two principal components of agar, and is purified from agar ... Read »


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    • Agelas

    • Agelas

      Agelas is a genus of demosponge. It is the only member of the family Agelasidae. Members of this genus are filter feeders. and occur in the West Indies, the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean in shallow tropical and subtropical waters down to a depth of 30 metres (98 ft) or exceptionally 50 met ... Read »


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    • Agelas clathrodes

    • Agelas clathrodes

      Agelas clathrodes, also known as the orange elephant ear sponge, is a species of demosponge. It lives on reefs in the Caribbean, usually more than 10 metres (33 ft) below the surface of the ocean. It takes various forms, and its color is reddish orange. The orange elephant ear sponge is very variable in form. I ... Read »


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    • Agelas flabelliformis

    • Agelas flabelliformis, also known as the elephant ear sponge, is a species of demosponge. It takes the form of a large leathery slender flap and is found in the Caribbean area at depths down to 100 metres (330 ft). The elephant ear sponge consists of a large thin flap of spongy material attached edgewise to the ... Read »


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    • Agelas gracilis

    • Agelas gracilis is a species of demosponge. Its common name is candy cane sponge. It lives primarily in Australian waters. It has a symbiotic relationship with the white zoanthid making red and white polyps. ... Read »


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    • Agelas schmidti

    • Agelas schmidti, the brown tubular sponge, is a species of demosponge. It occurs at moderate depths in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea and often has a colonial coral growing over the surface. The type locality is Puerto Rico. The brown tubular sponge is a large sponge forming mounds that may be a metre (y ... Read »


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    • Agent Orange

    • Agent Orange is a herbicide and defoliant chemical. It is widely known for its use by the U.S. military as part of its herbicidal warfare program, Operation Ranch Hand, during the Vietnam War from 1961 to 1971. It was a mixture of equal parts of two herbicides, 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D. The chemical damaged the health of peop ... Read »


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    • Aghaherrish

    • Aghaherrish (from Irish Achadh Thairis, meaning 'field of the crossing') is a townland located in Boho in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. The area is famous for a waterfall which is known as Boho Falls in some quarters. The river above the waterfall is known as the Trimog. The area was also the site of an old coun ... Read »


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    • Aghahoorin

    • Aghahoorin (from Irish Achadh Fhuarain, meaning 'field of the spring well') is a townland in the area of Boho, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. As far back as 1659 (Census of Ireland) this townland was known as Agharrin; later on it was known as Achadh Guirthin or Achadh Urthin "field of the suret" (1833). This tow ... Read »


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    • Aghakeeran

    • Aghakeeran (from Irish Achadh Chaorthainn, meaning 'field of rowan trees') is a townland in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. It is near Derrygonnelly, in the civil parish of Devenish and is situated within Fermanagh and Omagh district. One of the first mentions of the name of this townland was made during the surve ... Read »


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    • Aghanaglack

    • Aghanaglack or Aghnaglack (from Irish Achadh na Glaice, meaning 'field of the hollow'), is a townland in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. It is situated in the civil parish of Boho, as well as Fermanagh and Omagh district. Aghanaglack derives from the Irish achadh na glaice, meaning "field of the hollow". Alter ... Read »


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    • Agharahan

    • Agharahan (from Irish Achadh Rathain, meaning 'field of the ferns') is a townland is situated in the land division of Old Barr in the parish of Devenish, Barony of Magheraboy. It has an area of 746,831 m² / 74.68 hectares /0.29 square miles/184.55 acres / 184 acres. The townland runs from the high plateau in the Kno ... Read »


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    • Agnaridae

    • Agnaridae is a family of woodlice. They were formerly considered part of the Trachelipodidae, but were moved from that family to Porcellionidae in 1989, and then placed as a separate family in 2003. The family contains only two genera, Agnara Budde-Lund, 1908 and Pseudoagnara Taiti & Ferrara, 2004. ... Read »


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    • Agnelli family

    • The Agnelli family is an Italian multi-industry business dynasty founded by Giovanni Agnelli, one of the original founders in Piedmont (in 1899) of what became the FIAT motor company. They are also primarily known for other activities in the automotive industry as the owners of Ferrari since 1969, Lancia (1984), Alfa R ... Read »


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    • Agnes Morley Cleaveland

    • Agnes Morley Cleaveland

      Agnes Morley Cleaveland (1874–1958) was an American writer and cattle rancher who lived in New Mexico and California. Her book about growing up on a New Mexico ranch in the late 1800s, No Life for a Lady, was a best seller. She was active in politics and journalism as well as in public speaking and as a women's cl ... Read »


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    • Kelli Russell Agodon

    • Kelli Russell Agodon (born 1969 in Seattle) is an award-winning American poet, writer, and editor. She was raised in Seattle, and graduated from the University of Washington, and Pacific Lutheran University Rainier Writing Workshop with an MFA in creative writing. She lives in Washington State. Her work has appear ... Read »


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    • Agranular insula

    • Agranular insula is a portion of the cerebral cortex defined on the basis of internal structure in the human, the macaque, the rat, and the mouse. Classified as allocortex (periallocortex), it is in primates distinguished from adjacent neocortex (proisocortex) by absence of the external granular layer (II) and of the i ... Read »


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    • Laura Aguilar

    • Laura Aguilar (born 1959) is an American photographer. Her work focuses on the experiences of often marginalized people such as black women, lesbians, and the obese, as well as the perception of her own body. Aguilar is the daughter of a first-generation Mexican-American father, while her mother is of mixed Mexica ... Read »


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    • Agustín Carstens


    • Ahl-i Hadith

    • Ahl-i Hadith or Ahl-e-Hadith (Persian: اهل حدیث‎‎, Urdu: اہل حدیث‎, people of hadith) is a religious movement that emerged in Northern India in the mid-nineteenth century. Adherents of Ahl-i Hadith profess to hold the same views as the early Ahl al-Hadith movemen ... Read »


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    • Ahmad ibn Hanbal

    • Ahmad ibn Hanbal

      Aḥmad bin Muḥammad bin Ḥanbal AbÅ« Ê¿Abd Allāh al-ShaybānÄ« (Arabic: احمد بن محمد بن حنبل ابو عبد الله الشيباني‎‎; 780–855 CE/164–241 AH), often referred to as Aḥmad ... Read »


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    • Ahmad ibn Tulun

    • Ahmad ibn Tulun (Arabic: أحمد بن طولون‎, translit. Aḥmad ibn ṬūlÅ«n‎‎; ca. 20 September 835 – 10 May 884) was the founder of the Tulunid dynasty that ruled Egypt and Syria between 868 and 905. Originally a Turkic slave-soldier, in 868 Ibn Tulun was ... Read »


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    • Ahmed-Pasha Khimshiashvili

    • Ahmed Bey, subsequently Ahmed Paşa (1781 – October 1836) was a Muslim Georgian nobleman of the Khimshiashvili clan from Adjara, which he ruled as an autonomous ruler (bey) under the Ottoman Empire after 1818. He played a notable role in the Caucasian theatre of the Russo-Turkish War (1828–29) in which he f ... Read »


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    • Ai Jing

    • Ai Jing

      Ai Jing (Chinese: 艾敬; pinyin: Ài Jìng; born 10 September 1969 in Shenyang, Liaoning) is a mainland Chinese singer and painter. China's Northeast News called her "China's most talented female folk rock singer." Ai was born into a musical family: her father played several instruments, and her mother was ... Read »


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    • Ai Qing

    • Ai Qing

      Aì QÄ«ng (Chinese: 艾青; pinyin: Aì QÄ«ng; Wade–Giles: Ai Ch'ing; born Jiǎng Zhènghán (Chinese: 蒋正涵; pinyin: Jiǎng Zhènghán) and styled Jiǎng Hǎichéng (Chinese: 蒋海澄; pinyin: Jiǎng Hǎichéng); March 27, 1910 – May 5, 1996), is r ... Read »


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    • Aide-de-camp

    • An aide-de-camp (UK /ˌeid.dəˈkɑ̃ː/ or US /-ˈkæmp/;French expression meaning literally helper in the [military] camp) is a personal assistant or secretary to a person of high rank, usually a senior military, police or government officer, a member of a royal family, or a head of state. This is not ... Read »


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    • Ain Dara (archaeological site)

    • Ain Dara temple

      The Ain Dara temple, located near the village of Ain Dara, northwest of Aleppo, Syria, is an Iron Age Syro-Hittite temple noted for its similarities to Solomon's Temple, also known as the First Temple, as described in the Hebrew Bible. According to the excavator Ali Abu Assaf, it was in existence from 1300 BC until 740 ... Read »


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    • Ainu language

    • Ainu (/ˈaɪnuː/; Ainu: アイヌ・イタㇰ Aynu=itak; Japanese: アイヌ語 Ainu-go) or Hokkaido Ainu is the sole survivor of the Ainu languages. It is spoken by members of the Ainu ethnic group on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido. Until the 20th century, Ainu langua ... Read »


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    • Airy wave theory

    • In fluid dynamics, Airy wave theory (often referred to as linear wave theory) gives a linearised description of the propagation of gravity waves on the surface of a homogeneous fluid layer. The theory assumes that the fluid layer has a uniform mean depth, and that the fluid flow is inviscid, incompressible and irrotati ... Read »


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    • Martin Aitken

    • Martin Jim "M. J." Aitken FRS (11 March 1922 – 15 June 2017) was a British archaeometrist. Aitken organised annual meetings which became the "Symposium on Archaeometry and Archaeological Prospection". He retired in 1989 and died in June 2017 at the age of 95. ... Read »


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    • Funso Aiyejina

    • Funso Aiyejina (born 1949 in Ososo, Edo State, Nigeria) is a Nigerian poet, short story writer, playwright, and Dean of Humanities and Education, at the University of the West Indies. His collection of short fiction, The Legend of the Rockhills and Other Stories, won the 2000 Commonwealth Writers' Prize, Best First Boo ... Read »


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    • Adela Akers

    • Adela Akers (born February 7, 1933, Santiago de Compostela, Spain) is a Spanish-born textile and fiber artist. She is Professor Emeritus (1972 to 1995) at the Tyler School of Art. Her career as an artist spans the "whole history of modern fiber art." Her work is in the Renwick Gallery, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a ... Read »


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    • Akida

    • Akida was a title of indigenous rural officials in Tanganyika. At the time of the Zanzibar Sultanate, they acted as commanders of military divisions, and needed the approval of the sultan. During the German East African rule, the Germans adopted the title from pre-colonial Zanzibar-based administration, investing it wi ... Read »


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    • Al Gore

    • Al Gore

      Albert Arnold "Al" Gore, Jr. (born March 31, 1948) is an American politician and environmentalist who served as the 45th Vice President of the United States from 1993 to 2001 under President Bill Clinton. He was Clinton's running mate in their successful campaign in 1992, and was re-elected in 1996. At the end of Clint ... Read »


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    • Al Stump

    • Alvin John "Al" Stump (October 20, 1916 – December 14, 1995), was an American author and sports writer. Stump spent time with Detroit Tigers' Hall Of Fame baseball player Ty Cobb in 1960 and 1961 collaborating on Cobb's autobiography. My Life In Baseball: A True Record was released shortly after Cobb's death. From ... Read »


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    • Al-Asma'i


    • Al-Lat

    • Allat, also spelled Allatu, Alilat, Allāt, and al-Lāt (Arabic: اللات‎‎  pronounced [al(i)ˈlaːt(u)]) was the name and title of multiple goddess worshipped in pre-Islamic Arabia, including the one in Mecca who was a chief goddess along with Manāt and al-‘Uzzá. Th ... Read »


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    • Ala Moana Beach Park

    • Ala Moana Beach Park is a free public park on the island of Oahu, U.S. state of Hawaii, located between Waikiki and downtown Honolulu. This 100-acre (0.40 km2) park has a wide gold-sand beach that is over a half-mile (800 m) long. It is man-made and was created by the owner of the Dillingham Dredging Company, who wa ... Read »


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    • Alabama

    • Alabama

      As of 2010 Alabama (i/ˌæləˈbæmə/) is a state in the southeastern region of the United States. It is bordered by Tennessee to the north, Georgia to the east, Florida and the Gulf of Mexico to the south, and Mississippi to the west. Alabama is the 30th-most extensive and the 24th-most populous of the U ... Read »


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    • Alamo Christian Foundation

    • The Alamo Christian Foundation is a Christian cult. The current status of the church is unclear after the church's founder, Tony Alamo was arrested numerous times, beginning in 1991 and culminating in his 2009 conviction as a child sex offender. However, as of May 2016, the Alamo Ministries website is still online. ... Read »


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    • Alaungsithu

    • Alaungsithu

      Alaungsithu or Sithu I (Burmese: အလောင်းစည်သူ [ʔəláʊɴ sìðù]; also Cansu I; 1090–1167) was king of Pagan Dynasty of Burma (Myanmar) from 1112/13 to 1167. Sithu's reign was a prosperous one in which Pagan was an integral part of in-l ... Read »


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    • Albert Bandura

    • Albert Bandura

      Albert Bandura OC (/bænˈdʊərə/; born December 4, 1925) is a psychologist who is the David Starr Jordan Professor Emeritus of Social Science in Psychology at Stanford University. For almost six decades, he has been responsible for contributions to the field of education and to many fields of psychology, i ... Read »


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    • Albert Francis Judd

    • Albert Francis Judd

      Albert Francis Judd (January 7, 1838 – May 20, 1900) was a judge of the Kingdom of Hawaii who served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court through its transition into part of the United States. Judd was born January 7, 1838 at what was known as the "Old Mission Home" in Honolulu. His father was the physician ... Read »


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    • Albert Francis Judd, Jr.

    • Albert Francis Judd, Jr.

      Albert Francis Judd, Jr. (1874–1939) was a lawyer and trust officer in the Territory of Hawaii. Judd was born December 20, 1874 in Honolulu. His father was Albert Francis Judd (1838–1900) and mother Agnes Hall (Boyd) Judd. His grandfather was Gerrit P. Judd (1803–1873). Judd attended Oahu College ( ... Read »


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    • Albert Hazen Wright

    • Albert Hazen Wright (born August 15, 1879 in Hilton, New York; died July, 1970) was a professor at Cornell University and a herpetologist. He was also an honorary member of the International Ornithological Congress. He did a great deal of study of the Okefenokee Swamp. In 1955 he won the Eminent Ecologist Award. A ... Read »


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    • Alberto Gobbi

    • Alberto Gobbi (born 14 October 1956) is an Italian surgeon and researcher in Orthopedics, Traumatology and Sports Medicine known for his contributions in the fields of arthroscopic surgery, cartilage repair and regenerative medicine . He was born in Milan, Italy on October 14th 1956, he completed his medical studi ... Read »


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    • Albulae

    • Albulae

      Albulae is an ancient city and former bishopric in Roman Africa. It remains a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church. It is identified with the modern town of Ain Temouchent, in present Algeria, near the Moroccan border. Albulae was initially important enough in the Roman province of Mauretania Caesariensis to b ... Read »


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    • Albunione yoda

    • Albunione yoda is a marine isopod assigned to the family Bopyridae, which is known to occur near Taiwan. It is an ectoparasite that resides in the gills of its host, the mole crab Albunea groeningi. A. yoda was named after a character of the Star Wars saga, Jedi Master Yoda, because with the slightly curved long lat ... Read »


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    • Alcohol and cancer

    • Alcoholic beverages are classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a Group 1 carcinogen (carcinogenic to humans). IARC classifies alcoholic beverage consumption as a cause of female breast, colorectum, larynx, liver, esophagus, oral cavity, and pharynx cancers; and as a probable cause of pa ... Read »


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    • Alconbury

    • Alconbury

      Alconbury is a village and civil parish in Cambridgeshire, England. Alconbury is situated within Huntingdonshire which is a non-metropolitan district of Cambridgeshire as well as being an historic county of England. Alconbury lies approximately 5 miles (8 km) north-west of Huntingdon. In 1085 William the Conque ... Read »


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    • Alconbury Weston

    • Alconbury Weston

      Alconbury Weston – in Huntingdonshire (now part of Cambridgeshire), England – is a village and civil parish, lying just outside of the Fens, having just a few hills, but a significant change to the flat of the Fens. Alconbury Weston is situated 4.5 miles (7.2 km) north-west of Huntingdon. In 1085 Will ... Read »


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    • Aldermaston Brewery

    • The Aldermaston Brewery (later known as Strange's Brewery) was a brewery located near Aldermaston in Berkshire, UK. The brewery was established at Aldermaston Wharf in 1770, adjacent to the Kennet and Avon Canal. The brewery was bought by Thomas Strange in 1833. William Jeffreys Strange operated the brewery until 1902 ... Read »


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    • Aldgate

    • Aldgate

      Aldgate was the eastern-most gateway through the London Wall leading from the City of London to Whitechapel and the East End of London. It gives its name to a City ward bounded by White Kennet Street in the north and Crutched Friars in the south, taking in Leadenhall and Fenchurch Streets, which remain principal thorou ... Read »


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    • Aldrovandia gracilis

    • Aldrovandia gracilis

      Aldrovandia gracilis is a species of fish in the Halosauridae family. It is found in the north west Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico on the continental shelf and slope. It feeds on benthic invertebrates including bivalve molluscs, amphipods, mysids, polychaete worms and brittle stars. ... Read »


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    • Aldrovandia phalacra

    • Aldrovandia phalacra

      Aldrovandia phalacra, the Hawaiian halosaurid, is a species of ray-finned fish in the family Halosauridae. It is a circumglobal species found at bathyal depths. Aldrovandia phalacra is a long, slim, cylindrical fish growing to a length of 40 to 50 centimetres (16 to 20 in). The snout is pointed with the upper j ... Read »


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    • Aleksas AndriuÅ¡kevičius


    • Nikolay Alekseyev

    • Nikolay Alekseyev

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    • Aleutihenricia

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    • Pope Alexander VI

    • Pope Alexander VI

      Pope Alexander VI, born Roderic Borgia (Valencian: Roderic de Borja (Valencian pronunciation: [roðeˈɾiÉ¡ ʎanˈsɔɫ i ðe ˈβɔɾdʒa], Spanish: Rodrigo de Borja [roˈðɾiÉ£o lanˈθol i ðe ˈβorxa]); 1 January 1431 – 18 August 1503), was Pope from 11 Aug ... Read »


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    • Alexander del Mar

    • Alexander del Mar (aka Alexander Del Mar and Alexander Delmar) (August 9, 1836 - July 1, 1926) was an American political economist, historian, numismatist and author. He was the first Director of the Bureau of Statistics at the U.S. Treasury Department from 1866–69. Del Mar was a rigorous historian who made impor ... Read »


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    • Alexander Ewing (composer)

    • Alexander Ewing (3 January 1830 – 11 July 1895) was a Scottish musician, composer and translator. He was a career officer in the British Army's Commissariat Department and subsequently the Army Pay Corps. He composed the music for the popular hymn "Jerusalem the Golden". Ewing was born in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Read »


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    • Alexander Neckam

    • Alexander Neckam(8 September 1157 – 31 March 1217) was an English scholar, teacher, theologian and abbot of Cirencester Abbey from 1213 until his death. Born on 8 September 1157 in St Albans, Alexander shared his birthday with King Richard I. For this reason, his mother, Hodierna of St Albans, was hired by ... Read »


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    • Actinium sesquioxide.jpg


    • Actinium sesquioxide.jpg


    • Actinium.jpg


    • Actinium.jpg


    • Berkelium(IV) oxide.jpg


    • Berkelium(IV) oxide.jpg


    • Eugenics supporters hold signs on Wall Street.jpg


    • Eugenics supporters hold signs on Wall Street.jpg


    • Pm oxide.jpg


    • Pm oxide.jpg


    • Polonium.jpg


    • Polonium.jpg


    • Protactinium(V) oxide.jpg


    • Protactinium(V) oxide.jpg


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  • What Else?

    • CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter

Extras