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    Architectural history

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    • Architectural history

    • The history of architecture traces the changes in architecture through various traditions, regions, overarching stylistic trends, and dates. The branches of architecture are civil, sacred, naval, military, and landscape architecture. Neolithic architecture is the architecture of the Neolithic period. In Southwest A ... Architectural history


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    • architecture

    • Architecture (Latin , from the Greek arkhitekton "architect", from "chief" and "builder") is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings and other physical structures. Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works ... architecture


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    • Architectural history by country

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    • Architecture by period

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    • Architectural styles

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    • Architecture by century

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    • Achaemenid architecture

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    • Anatolia Beyliks architecture

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    • Ancient Greek architecture

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    • Ancient Near East art and architecture

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    • Ancient Roman architecture

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    • Anglo-Saxon architecture

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    • Architectural historians

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    • Architecture groups

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    • Baroque architecture

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    • Biedermeier architecture

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    • Brutalist architecture

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    • Byzantine architecture

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    • Byzantine Revival architecture

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    • Christian architecture


    • Classical architecture

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    • Classicist architecture

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    • Colonial architecture

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    • Constructivist architecture

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    • Deconstructivism

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    • Dzongs

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    • Ancient Egyptian architecture

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    • Expressionist architecture

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    • Former buildings and structures

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    • Gothic architecture

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    • Hellenistic architecture

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    • Historicist architecture

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    • Islamic architecture

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    • Architectural history lists

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    • Maya architecture


    • Medieval architecture

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    • Mesoamerican architecture

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    • Mission 66

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    • Modernist architecture

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    • Moorish architecture

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    • Architecture museums

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    • Native American architecture


    • Nazi architecture

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    • Ottoman architecture

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    • Palaeo-Christian architecture


    • Postmodern architecture

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    • Pre-Columbian architecture


    • Puebloan architecture

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    • Renaissance architecture

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    • Revivalism

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    • Rock cut architecture

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    • Romanesque architecture

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    • Rustic architecture

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    • Sasanian architecture

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    • Seljuk architecture

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    • Victorian architecture

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    • Architecture writers

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    • History of architecture

    • The history of architecture traces the changes in architecture through various traditions, regions, overarching stylistic trends, and dates. The branches of architecture are civil, sacred, naval, military, and landscape architecture. Neolithic architecture is the architecture of the Neolithic period. In Southwest A ... Read »


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    • Table of years in architecture

    • The table of years in architecture is a tabular display of all years in architecture, for overview and quick navigation to any year. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 ... Read »


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    • Timeline of architectural styles

    • This timeline shows the periods of various styles of architecture in a graphical fashion. ... Read »


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    • Timeline of architecture

    • This is a timeline of architecture, indexing the individual year in architecture pages. Notable events in architecture and related disciplines including structural engineering, landscape architecture and city planning. One significant architectural achievement is listed for each year. Articles for each year (in bold t ... Read »


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    • Timeline of architectural styles 1750–1900


    • Achaemenid architecture

    • Achaemenid architecture (Persian: معماری هخامنشیان) includes all architectural achievements of the Achaemenid Persians manifesting in construction of spectacular cities used for governance and inhabitation (Persepolis, Susa, Ecbatana), temples made for worship and social gat ... Read »


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    • Adyton

    • The adyton (Greek: Άδυτον) or adytum (Latin) was a restricted area within the cella of a Greek or Roman temple. Its name meant "inaccessible" or "do not enter". The adyton was frequently a small area at the farthest end of the cella from the entrance: at Delphi it measured just nine by twelve feet. Th ... Read »


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    • Ancient Chinese urban planning

    • Ancient Chinese urban planning encompasses the diverse set of cultural beliefs, social and economic structures, and technological capacities that historically influenced urban design in the early period of Chinese civilization.  Factors that have shaped the development of Chinese urbanism include: fengshui geomancy ... Read »


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    • Ancient Egyptian architecture

    • Ancient Egyptian architecture is the architecture of Ancient Egypt, one of the most influential civilizations throughout history, which developed a vast array of diverse structures and great architectural monuments along the Nile, including pyramids and temples. Due to the scarcity of wood, the two predominant bui ... Read »


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    • Ancient monument

    • In British law, an ancient monument is an early historical structure or monument (e.g. an archaeological site) worthy of preservation and study due to archaeological or heritage interest. The term differs from the American term "National Monument" in that U.S. National Monuments are comparatively few in number and may ... Read »


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    • Ancient Monuments Society

    • The Ancient Monuments Society (AMS) is a learned society and registered charity in England and Wales, founded in 1924 "for the study and conservation of ancient monuments, historic buildings and fine old craftsmanship". The Ancient Monuments Society is recognised as one of the National Amenity Societies, and as su ... Read »


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    • Ancient Roman architecture

    • Ancient Roman architecture adopted the external language of classical Greek architecture for the purposes of the ancient Romans, but grew so different from Greek buildings as to become a new architectural style. The two styles are often considered one body of classical architecture. Roman architecture flourished in the ... Read »


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    • Antonia Fortress

    • The Antonia Fortress was a military barracks built over the Hasmonean Baris by Herod the Great. Named for his patron Mark Antony, a pre 31 BC date is certain for the Fort as Mark Anthony was defeated by Octavius (later Augustus Caesar) at the sea battle of Actium in 31 BC. Built in Jerusalem on the site of earlier Ptol ... Read »


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    • History of Apartments

    • An apartment (American English), flat (British English) or unit (Australian English), is a self-contained housing unit (a type of residential real estate) that occupies only part of a building, generally on a single level. Such a building may be called an apartment building, apartment complex, flat complex, block of fl ... Read »


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    • Arch of Constantine

    • Arch of Constantine

      The Arch of Constantine (Italian: Arco di Costantino) is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal ar ... Read »


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    • Archiam Centre

    • Centre for the Study of Architecture and Cultural Heritage of India, Arabia and the Maghreb

      The Centre for the Study of Architecture and Cultural Heritage of India, Arabia and the Maghreb (ArCHIAM Centre), based at Nottingham Trent University, UK aims to provide an interdisciplinary research platform for historical and contemporary cultural developments across three interconnected global regions. The Centre ... Read »


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    • Architectura

    • Architectura: Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Baukunst is a biannual peer-reviewed academic journal of the history of architecture published by Deutscher Kunstverlag. The journal was established in 1971 and is abstracted and indexed in the Arts and Humanities Citation Index,Art Abstracts,Art Index, and Current Conten ... Read »


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    • Architectural History (journal)

    • Discipline History of architecture Language English Edited by Dr Alistair Fair Publication details Publisher
      SAHGB Publications Ltd (UK)
      Publication history
      1958–present Frequency Annually Indexing ISSN 0066-622X
      LCCN 2005-237367 OCLC no.
    • Architectural History  

      Architectural History is the main journal of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain (SAHGB). The journal is published each autumn and usually comprises around 400 pages. The architecture of the British Isles is a major theme of the journal, but articles can consider all places and periods. All articl ... Read »


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    • Architectural metals

    • Metals used for architectural purposes include lead, for water pipes, roofing, and windows; tin, formed into tinplate; zinc, copper and aluminium, in a range of applications including roofing and decoration; and iron, which has structural and other uses in the form of cast iron or wrought iron, or made into steel. Meta ... Read »


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    • Architectural mythology

    • Architectural mythology means the symbolism of real-world architecture, as well as architecture described in mythological stories. In addition to language a myth could be represented by a painting, a sculpture or a building. It is about the overall story of an architectural work, often revealed through art. Not all st ... Read »


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    • Architectural style

    • An architectural style is characterized by the features that make a building or other structure notable or historically identifiable. A style may include such elements as , method of construction, building materials, and regional character. Most architecture can be classified within a chronology of styles which changes ... Read »


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    • List of architectural styles

    • An architectural style is characterized by the features that make a building or other structure notable and historically identifiable. A style may include such elements as , method of construction, building materials, and regional character. Most architecture can be classified as a chronology of styles which changes ov ... Read »


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    • Architectural theory

    • Architectural theory is the act of thinking, discussing, and writing about architecture. Architectural theory is taught in most architecture schools and is practiced by the world's leading architects. Some forms that architecture theory takes are the lecture or dialogue, the treatise or book, and the paper project or c ... Read »


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    • Ancient Greek architecture

    • The architecture of ancient Greece is the architecture produced by the Greek-speaking people (Hellenic people) whose culture flourished on the Greek mainland, the Peloponnese, the Aegean Islands, and in colonies in Anatolia and Italy for a period from about 900 BC until the 1st century AD, with the earliest remaining a ... Read »


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    • Architecture of Kievan Rus'


    • Architecture of Scotland in the Prehistoric era


    • Architecture of the Cucuteni–Trypillian culture


    • Architecture of the Song dynasty

    • The architecture of the Song dynasty (960–1279) was noted for its towering Buddhist pagodas, enormous stone and wooden bridges, lavish tombs, and extravagant palaces. Although literary works on architecture existed beforehand, architectural writing blossomed during the Song dynasty, maturing into a more profession ... Read »


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    • Spanish Renaissance architecture

    • Renaissance architecture was that style of architecture which evolved firstly in Florence and then Rome and other parts of Italy as the result of Humanism and a revived interest in Classical architecture. It was part of the general movement known as the Renaissance which spread outwards from Italy and affected many asp ... Read »


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    • Arcus Novus

    • Arcus Novus

      Coordinates: 41°53′53.43″N 12°28′53.50″E / 41.8981750°N 12.4815278°E / 41.8981750; 12.4815278 The Arcus Novus was an ancient arch in Rome, located on the Via lata (now the Via del Corso ), at the site of the church of Santa Maria in Via Lata. The arch was dedicate ... Read »


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    • Athens Charter

    • The Athens Charter (French: Charte d'Athènes) was a document about urban planning published by the Swiss architect, Le Corbusier in 1943. The work was based upon Le Corbusier’s Ville Radieuse (Radiant City) book of 1935 and urban studies undertaken by the Congrès International d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM) i ... Read »


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    • Athens Charter (preservation)

    • The Athens Charter for the Restoration of Historic Monuments is a seven-point manifesto adopted at the First International Congress of Architects and Technicians of Historic Monuments in Athens in 1931. The Athens Charter for the Restoration of Historic Monuments was produced by the participants of the First Internati ... Read »


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    • Atlas (architecture)

    • In classical European architecture, an atlas (also known as an atlant, or atlante or atlantid; plural atlantes) is a support sculpted in the form of a man, which may take the place of a column, a pier or a pilaster. The Roman term for such a sculptural support is telamon (plural telamones or telamons). The term atlant ... Read »


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    • Baluster

    • A baluster— also called spindle or stair stick—is a moulded shaft, square or of lathe-turned form, a form cut from a rectangular or square plank, one of various forms of spindle in woodwork, made of stone or wood and sometimes of metal, standing on a unifying footing, and supporting the coping of a parapet or ... Read »


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    • Architecture of Bangladesh

    • Architecture of Bangladesh refers to the architectural attributes and styles of Bangladesh. The architecture of Bangladesh has a long history and is rooted in Bangladesh's culture, religion and history. It has evolved over centuries and assimilated influences from social, religious and exotic communities. The architect ... Read »


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    • Baroque architecture

    • Baroque architecture is the building style of the Baroque era, begun in late 16th-century Italy, that took the Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical and theatrical fashion, often to express the triumph of the Catholic Church and the absolutist state. It was characterized by new ex ... Read »


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    • Battle of the Styles

    • The Battle of the Styles is a term used to refer to the conflict between supporters of the Gothic style and the Classical style in architecture. In Britain this led to public debates between Decimus Burton and Augustus Pugin. Later in the century the revival of vernacular architecture led to an increasing palette of s ... Read »


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    • Belvedere Apartments (Columbia, Missouri)

    • Belvedere Apartments is a well-preserved Spanish Colonial Revival-style apartment building located at 206 Hitt Street in downtown Columbia, Missouri. Built in 1927, the building was designed by notable female architect, Nelle Peters. The building was added to Columbia's Notable Buildings List in 2008 and is a possible ... Read »


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    • Bristol Byzantine

    • Bristol Byzantine is a variety of Byzantine Revival architecture that was popular in the city of Bristol from about 1850 to 1880. Many buildings in the style have been destroyed or demolished, but notable surviving examples include the Colston Hall, the Granary on Welsh Back, the Carriage Works, on Stokes Croft and se ... Read »


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    • Brusselization

    • In urban planning, Brusselization (French: bruxellisation, Dutch: verbrusseling) is "the indiscriminate and careless introduction of modern high-rise buildings into gentrified neighbourhoods" and has become a byword for "haphazard urban development and redevelopment". The notion applies to anywhere whose development f ... Read »


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    • Buddhist monastery

    • Vihara (विहार, vihāra) is the Sanskrit and Pali term for a Buddhist monastery. It originally meant "a secluded place in which to walk", and referred to "dwellings" or "refuges" used by wandering monks during the rainy season. The northern Indian state of Bihar derives its name from the word ... Read »


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    • Carolingian architecture

    • Carolingian architecture is the style of north European Pre-Romanesque architecture belonging to the period of the Carolingian Renaissance of the late 8th and 9th centuries, when the Carolingian dynasty dominated west European politics. It was a conscious attempt to emulate Roman architecture and to that end it borrowe ... Read »


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    • Castellane

    • Castellane

      1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. Castellane (French pronunciation: ​[kastɛlan]; Provençal: Castelana) is a commune in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence department in southeastern France. With about 1,600 inhabitants ... Read »


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    • Catenary arch

    • A catenary arch is a type of architectural pointed arch that follows an inverted catenary curve. It is common in cathedrals and in Gothic arches used in Gothic architecture. It is not a parabolic arch. The 17th-century scientist Robert Hooke wrote, "Ut pendet continuum flexile, sic stabit contiguum rigidum inversu ... Read »


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    • Catherine de' Medici's building projects


    • Catherine de' Medici's patronage of the arts


    • The Center for Palladian Studies in America, Inc.


    • Chinese architecture

    • Chinese architecture is a style of architecture that has taken shape in East Asia over many centuries. The structural principles of Chinese architecture have remained largely unchanged, the main changes being only the decorative details. Since the Tang Dynasty, Chinese architecture has had a major influence on the arch ... Read »


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    • Choto Sona Mosque

    • Choto Sona Mosque

      Choto Shona Mosque (Bengali: ছোট সোনা মসজিদ, Small Golden Mosque) is located in Chapai Nawabganj district of Bangladesh. The mosque is situated about 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) south of the Kotwali Gate and 0.5 kilometres (0.31 mi) to the south-east of the Mu ... Read »


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    • Churrigueresque

    • Churrigueresque (/tʃʊərrɪɡəˈrɛsk/) refers to a Spanish Baroque style of elaborate sculptural architectural ornament which emerged as a manner of stucco decoration in Spain in the late 17th century and was used up to about 1750, marked by extreme, expressive and florid decorative detailing, norma ... Read »


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    • Classical architecture

    • Classical architecture usually denotes architecture which is more or less consciously derived from the principles of Greek and Roman architecture of classical antiquity, or sometimes even more specifically, from the works of Vitruvius. Different styles of classical architecture have arguably existed since the Carolingi ... Read »


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    • Conservation and restoration of historic gardens

    • Historic garden conservation is a specialised type of historic preservation and conservation or restoration concerned with historical and landmark gardens and designed landscapes. Practitioners predominantly come from backgrounds in horticulture, garden design, landscape design, and landscape architecture. To prep ... Read »


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    • Conservation Plan

    • The Conservation Plan is an important publication written by James Semple Kerr in 1982, and revised many times. It was a landmark in Australian conservation. The document "...outlines the logical processes of the Burra Charter, and how to prepare a Conservation Plan to guide and manage change to a heritage item appropr ... Read »


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    • Construction history

    • People have constructed buildings and other structures since prehistory, including bridges, amphitheatres, dams, roads and canals. Building materials in present use have a long history and some of the structures built thousands of years ago are regarded as remarkable. The history of construction overlaps that of struct ... Read »


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    • Cottage window

    • A cottage window is a double-hung window — i.e., a window with two sashes sliding up and down, hung with one atop the other in the same frame — in which the upper sash is smaller (shorter) than the lower one. The upper sash often contains smaller lights divided by muntins (often known as a "divided light patt ... Read »


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    • Cour d'honneur


    • Croatian pre-Romanesque art and architecture

    • Croatian Pre-Romanesque art and architecture or Old Croatian Art is Pre-Romanesque art and architecture of Croats from their arrival at Balkans till the end of the 11th century when begins the dominance of Romanesque style in art; that was the time of Croatian rulers (Croatian dukes and Croatian Kingdom). Croats h ... Read »


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    • Diocletian window

    • Diocletian windows, also called thermal windows, are large semicircular windows characteristic of the enormous public baths (thermae) of Ancient Rome. They have been revived on a limited basis by some classical revivalist architects in more modern times. Diocletian windows are large segmental arched windows (or ot ... Read »


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    • Dzong architecture

    • Dzong architecture is a distinctive type of fortress (Wylie: rdzong, IPA: [tzɦoŋ˩˨]) architecture found mainly in Bhutan and the former Tibet. The architecture is massive in style with towering exterior walls surrounding a complex of courtyards, temples, administrative offices, and monks' accommodation. ... Read »


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    • Early skyscrapers

    • The early skyscrapers were a range of tall, commercial buildings built between 1884 and 1939, predominantly in the American cities of New York City and Chicago. Cities in the United States were traditionally made up of low-rise buildings, but significant economic growth after the Civil War and increasingly intensive us ... Read »


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    • Edwardian Baroque architecture

    • Edwardian Baroque is the Neo-Baroque architectural style of many public buildings built in the British Empire during the Edwardian era (1901–1910). The characteristic features of the Edwardian Baroque style were drawn from two main sources: the architecture of France during the 18th century and that of Sir Ch ... Read »


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    • Eglinton Castle

    • Eglinton Castle

      Eglinton Castle was a large Gothic castellated mansion in Kilwinning, North Ayrshire, Scotland. The ancient seat of the Earls of Eglinton, it is located just south of the town of Kilwinning. The original Eglinton Castle was burnt by the Earl of Glencairn in 1528. The current castle was built between 1797 and 1802 ... Read »


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    • Egyptian Revival architecture in the British Isles

    • Eqyptian Revival architecture in the British Isles, is a survey of motifs derived from Ancient Egyptian sources occurring as an architectural style. Egyptian Revival architecture is comparatively rare in the British Isles. Obelisks start appearing in the 17th century, mainly as decorative features on buildings and by t ... Read »


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    • European medieval architecture in North America

    • Medieval architecture in North America is an anachronism. Some structures in North America can however be classified as medieval, either by age or origin. In some rare cases these structures are seen as evidence on pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact. Independent of whether one believes in the disputed pseudoscience, t ... Read »


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    • Expressionist architecture

    • Expressionist architecture was an architectural movement that developed in Europe during the first decades of the 20th century in parallel with the expressionist visual and performing arts that especially developed and dominated in Germany. Brick Expressionism is a special variant, that dominates in western and northe ... Read »


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    • Facadism

    • Facadism, façadism (or façadomy) refers to an architectural and construction practice where the facade of a building was designed or constructed separately from the rest of a building. More often it refers to the practice where only the facade of a building is preserved with new buildings erected behind or around ... Read »


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    • Federation architecture

    • Federation architecture is the architectural style in Australia that was prevalent from around 1890 to 1915. The name refers to the Federation of Australia on 1 January 1901, when the Australian colonies collectively became the Commonwealth of Australia. The architectural style had antecedents in the Queen Anne style ... Read »


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    • Forgotten Chicago

    • Forgotten Chicago is an organization that seeks to discover and document little known elements of Chicago’s infrastructure, architecture, neighborhoods and general cityscape, whether existing or historical. The organization exposes many of these often overlooked elements of Chicago’s built environment to a w ... Read »


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    • Friends of Friendless Churches

    • The Friends of Friendless Churches is a registered charity active in England and Wales. It campaigns for and rescues redundant historic churches threatened by demolition, decay, or inappropriate conversion. To that end, as of March 2012, it owns 44 former churches or chapels, 23 of which are in England, and 21 ... Read »


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    • Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation

    • The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is the country's largest statewide, nonprofit preservation organization with more than 8,000 members. Founded in 1973, the Trust is committed to preserving and enhancing Georgia’s communities and their diverse historic resources for the education and enjoyment of all. T ... Read »


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    • Gothic architecture

    • Gothic architecture is a style of architecture that flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. It evolved from Romanesque architecture and was succeeded by Renaissance architecture. Originating in 12th-century France and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture was known during the period ... Read »


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    • Great Rebuilding

    • A Great Rebuilding is a period in which a heightened level of building work, architectural change, building or rebuilding occurred. More specifically, W. G. Hoskins defined the term "The Great Rebuilding" in England as the period from the mid-16th century until 1640. Hoskins' initial theory held that during this perio ... Read »


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    • Modern Greek architecture

    • After the Fall of Constantinople and the following trends of Greek migration to the diaspora, Greek architecture was concentrated mainly on the Greek Orthodox churches of Diaspora. These churches, such as other intellectual centres built by Greeks (foundations, schools, etc.), was used also as a meeting-place. The arch ... Read »


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    • Hamburg temple model

    • The Hamburg temple model is a baroque architectural model of the Temple of Solomon. It covers an area of about 12 square metres (130 sq ft) and is made from wood. It is square, with four wings and nine courtyards, two of them in the central axis. It was made from 1680 to 1692 after being commissioned by the Hamb ... Read »


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    • Harappan architecture

    • Harappan architecture is the architecture of the Harappans, an ancient people who lived in the Indus Valley from about 3300 BCE to 1300 BCE. The Harappans were advanced for their time, especially in architecture. ... Read »


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    • Harvard Five

    • The Harvard Five was a group of architects that settled in New Canaan, Connecticut in the 1940s: John M. Johansen, Marcel Breuer, Landis Gores, Philip Johnson and Eliot Noyes. Marcel Breuer was an instructor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, while Gores, Johansen, Johnson and Noyes were students there. They we ... Read »


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    • Heritage conservation in Canada

    • Heritage conservation in Canada deals with actions or processes that are aimed at safeguarding the character-defining elements of a cultural resource so as to retain its heritage value and extend its physical life. Historic objects in Canada may be granted special designation by any of the three levels of government: t ... Read »


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    • Herodian architecture

    • Herodian architecture is a style of classical architecture characteristic of the numerous building projects undertaken during the reign (37–4 BC) of Herod the Great, the Roman client king of Judea. Herod undertook many colossal building projects, most famously his reconstruction of the Temple in Jerusalem (c. 19 B ... Read »


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    • Herod's Palace (Jerusalem)


    • High-tech architecture

    • High-tech architecture, also known as Late Modernism or Structural Expressionism, is an architectural style that emerged in the 1970s, incorporating elements of high-tech industry and technology into building design. High-tech architecture appeared as revamped modernism, an extension of those previous ideas helped by e ... Read »


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    • Historic preservation

    • Historic preservation (US), heritage preservation or heritage conservation (UK), is an endeavour that seeks to preserve, conserve and protect buildings, objects, landscapes or other artifacts of historical significance. The term tends to refer specifically to the preservation of the built environment, and not to preser ... Read »


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    • History of fountains in the United States

    • The first decorative fountain in the United States was dedicated in City Hall Park, in New York City, in 1842. Early American fountains were used to distribute clean drinking water, had little ornamentation, and copied European styles. In the 20th century, American fountains often ceased to distribute drinking water; ... Read »


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    • Hypaethral

    • Hypaethral is an ancient temple with no roof. (From the Latin hypaethrus, from Ancient Greek ὕπαιθρος hupaithros ὑπό hupo- "under" and αἰθήρ aither "sky, air".) It was described by the Roman architect Vitruvius in his treatise On Architecture written for the emperor ... Read »


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    • I quattro libri dell'architettura


    • Inca architecture

    • Incan architecture is the most significant pre-Columbian architecture in South America. The Incas inherited an architectural legacy from Tiwanaku, founded in the 2nd century BCE in present-day Bolivia. The capital of the Inca empire, Cusco, still contains many fine examples of Inca architecture, although many walls of ... Read »


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    • Isabelline style

    • The Isabelline style, also called the Isabelline Gothic (in Spanish, Gótico Isabelino), or Castilian late Gothic, was the dominant architectural style of the Crown of Castile during the reign of Catholic Monarchs (late-15th century to early-16th century). Emile Bertaux named the style after Queen Isabella of Castile ... Read »


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    • Italian Baroque architecture

    • Italian Baroque architecture refers to baroque architecture in Italy. The sacred architecture of the Baroque period had its beginnings in the Italian paradigm of the basilica with crossed dome and nave. One of the first Roman structures to break with the Mannerist conventions exemplified in the Gesù, was the ch ... Read »


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    • Italian Renaissance

    • The Italian Renaissance (Italian: Rinascimento [rinaʃʃiˈmento]) was the earliest manifestation of the general European Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement that began in Italy during the 14th century and lasted until the 16th century, marking the transition between Medieval and Early ... Read »


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    • Jaintia Rajbari

    • Jaintia Rajbari is located in Jaintiapur, Sylhet, Bangladesh. It was the residence of Kings of Jaintia Kingdom. The word "Jaintia" derived from the shrine of Jayanti Devi or Jainteswari, an incarnation of goddess Durga. Coordinates: 25°08′02″N 92°07′18″E / 25.133783°N 92.121704 ... Read »


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    • James Semple Kerr

    • James Semple Kerr AM (6 July 1932 – 15 October 2014) was an architectural historian and heritage practitioner in Australia, who was prominent in the drafting of the original Burra Charter and its subsidiary documents, and developing standards for conservation practice, particularly in relation to conservation asse ... Read »


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    • Landmark Columbus

    • Landmark Columbus

      Landmark Columbus is an organization in Columbus, Indiana, United States, that is dedicated to caring for and celebrating the world-renowned design heritage of Columbus, a city which is home to seven of the forty three National Historic Landmarks in Indiana. It was started as a program of Heritage Fund – The Commu ... Read »


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    • List of oldest buildings in Scotland

    • This article lists the oldest extant freestanding buildings in Scotland. In order to qualify for the list a structure must: This consciously excludes ruins of limited height, roads and statues. Bridges may be included if they otherwise fulfill the above criteria. Dates for many of the oldest structures have been arriv ... Read »


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    • Longhua Temple

    • Longhua Temple

      The Longhua Temple (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Shanghainese: Lon-ngu-zy, literally "Lustre of the Dragon Temple") is a Buddhist Temple dedicated to the Maitreya Buddha located in Shanghai, China. Although most of the present-day buildings date from later reconstructions, the temple preserves the architectural design of a So ... Read »


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    • Los Angeles Conservancy

    • The Los Angeles Conservancy is a historic preservation organization in Los Angeles, California. It works to document, rescue and revitalize historic buildings, places and neighborhoods in the city. The Conservancy is the largest membership based historic preservation organization in the country. The group was formed in ... Read »


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    • Ludington Building

    • Ludington Building

      The Ludington Building is the earliest-surviving, steel-frame building in Chicago, Illinois. It is located in the Chicago Loop community area. It was designed by William Le Baron Jenney and was named a Chicago Landmark on June 10, 1996. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on May 8, 1980. The Luding ... Read »


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    • Mahavihara

    • Mahavihara (Mahāvihāra) is the Sanskrit and Pali term for a great vihara (Buddhist monastery) and is used to describe a monastic complex of viharas. A range of monasteries grew up in ancient Magadha (modern Bihar) and Bengal. According to Tibetan sources, five great Mahaviharas stood out during the Pāla p ... Read »


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    • Manueline

    • The Manueline (Portuguese: estilo manuelino, IPA: [ɨʃˈtilu mɐnweˈɫinu]), or Portuguese late Gothic, is the sumptuous, composite Portuguese style of architectural ornamentation of the first decades of the 16th century, incorporating maritime elements and representations of the discoveries brought fr ... Read »


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    • MARS Group

    • The Modern Architectural Research Group, or MARS Group, was a British architectural think tank founded in 1933 by several prominent architects and architectural critics of the time involved in the British modernist movement. The MARS Group came after several previous but unsuccessful attempts at creating an organizatio ... Read »


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    • Masonic Temple

    • In Freemasonry, a Masonic Temple or Masonic Hall is the room or structure where a Masonic Lodge meets. Masonic Temple may also refer to an abstract spiritual goal and the conceptual ritualistic space of a meeting. In the early years of Freemasonry, from the 17th through the 18th centuries, it was most common for M ... Read »


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    • The Cloisters (Letchworth)

    • The Cloisters in Letchworth Garden City, Hertfordshire in the UK was built in 1905 as an open-air school dedicated to Psychology and where students were taught skills from the Arts and Crafts movement. After a period of neglect during World War II The Cloisters became the North Hertfordshire Masonic Centre in 1951. ... Read »


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    • Maya architecture

    • A unique and intricate style, the tradition of Maya architecture spans several thousands of years. Often, the buildings most dramatic and easily recognizable as Mayans are the stepped pyramids the Terminal Pre-classic period and beyond. Being based on the general Mesoamerican architectural traditions, these pyramids re ... Read »


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    • Melville Walker House

    • Melville Walker House

      The Melville Walker House is an inn on Maine Street in the Kennebunkport Historic District in Kennebunkport, Maine. The inn was added to the National Register of Historic Places on May 6, 1976. It is now known as the Maine Stay Inn. The Melville Walker House was built as a private residence in 1860 by merchant sea ... Read »


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    • Merovingian art

    • Merovingian art is the art of the Merovingian dynasty of the Franks, which lasted from the 5th century to the 8th century in present-day France, Benelux and a part of Germany. The advent of the Merovingian dynasty in Gaul in the 5th century led to important changes in the field of arts. Sculpture regressed to be little ... Read »


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    • Mesoamerican architecture

    • Mesoamerican architecture is the set of architectural traditions produced by pre-Columbian cultures and civilizations of Mesoamerica, traditions which are best known in the form of public, ceremonial and urban monumental buildings and structures. The distinctive features of Mesoamerican architecture encompass a number ... Read »


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    • Architecture of Mesopotamia

    • The architecture of Mesopotamia is ancient architecture of the region of the Tigris–Euphrates river system (also known as Mesopotamia), encompassing several distinct cultures and spanning a period from the 10th millennium BC, when the first permanent structures were built, to the 6th century BC. Among the Mesopota ... Read »


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    • Metabolism (architecture)

    • Metabolism (新陳代謝, shinchintaisha?) was a post-war Japanese architectural movement that fused ideas about architectural megastructures with those of organic biological growth. It had its first international exposure during CIAM's 1959 meeting and its ideas were tentatively tested by students from Ken ... Read »


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    • Mills Archive

    • The Mills Archive was established in 2002 to preserve and protect records of milling heritage and to make them freely available to the public. It is governed by the Mills Archive Trust, which is a charity that is based at Watlington House, Reading, Berkshire. The Mills Archive Trust was established in 2002. A gran ... Read »


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    • Missions Héliographiques


    • Modern architecture

    • Modern Architecture

      Modern architecture or modernist architecture is a term applied to a group of styles of architecture which emerged in the first half of the 20th century and became dominant after World War II. It was based upon new technologies of construction, particularly the use of glass, steel and reinforced concrete; and upon a re ... Read »


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    • Moorish architecture

    • Moorish architecture is the architectural tradition that appeared in the Maghreb region and the Iberian peninsula after the Arab Islamic conquest. Characteristic elements of Moorish architecture include muqarnas, horseshoe arches, voussoirs, domes, crenellated arches, lancet arches, ogee arches, courtyards, and de ... Read »


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    • National Churches Trust

    • The National Churches Trust, formerly the Historic Churches Preservation Trust, is a British registered charity whose aim is "promoting and supporting church buildings of historic, architectural and community value across the UK". It carries out this aim by providing financial grants to repair and modernise church buil ... Read »


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    • National Romantic style

    • The National Romantic style was a Nordic architectural style that was part of the National Romantic movement during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is often considered to be a form of Art Nouveau. The National Romantic style spread across Finland; the Scandinavian countries of Denmark, Norway, and Swede ... Read »


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    • Nayabad Mosque

    • Nayabad Mosque

      Nayabad Mosque or Noyabaad Mosque, is located in Nayabad village in Kaharole Upazila of Dinajpur District, Bangladesh, beside the Dhepa River. It is reputed to have been built for their own use by the architects and builders of Kantajew Temple. The building is oblong, with three entrances on one side. The roof has thr ... Read »


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    • Neolithic architecture

    • Neolithic architecture refers to structures encompassing housing and shelter from approximately 10,000 to 2,000 BC, the Neolithic period. In southwest Asia, Neolithic cultures appear soon after 10,000 BC, initially in the Levant (Pre-Pottery Neolithic A and Pre-Pottery Neolithic B) and from there into the east and west ... Read »


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    • New Formalism (architecture)

    • New Formalism is an architectural style that emerged in the United States during the mid 1950s and flowered in the 1960s. Buildings designed in that style exhibited many Classical elements including "strict symmetrical elevations" building proportion and scale, Classical columns, highly stylized entablatures and colonn ... Read »


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    • Nordic Classicism

    • Nordic Classicism was a style of architecture that briefly blossomed in the Nordic countries (Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland) between 1910 and 1930. Until a resurgence of interest for the period during the 1980s (marked by several scholarly studies and public exhibitions), Nordic Classicism was regarded as a mere ... Read »


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    • Norman architecture

    • The term Norman architecture is used to categorise styles of Romanesque architecture developed by the Normans in the various lands under their dominion or influence in the 11th and 12th centuries. In particular the term is traditionally used for English Romanesque architecture. The Normans introduced large numbers of c ... Read »


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    • Office of the Supervising Architect

    • The Office of the Supervising Architect was an agency of the United States Treasury Department that designed federal government buildings from 1852 to 1939. The office handled some of the most important architectural commissions of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among its creations are the well-known State, W ... Read »


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    • Ontario Heritage Act

    • The Ontario Heritage Act, first enacted on March 5, 1975, allows municipalities and the provincial government to designate individual properties and districts in the Province of Ontario, Canada, as being of cultural heritage value or interest. Once a property has been designated under Part IV of the Act, a propert ... Read »


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    • List of open-air and living museums

    • This is a list of open-air and living history museums by country. Some ecological living museums are zoos ... Read »


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    • Open-air museum

    • An open-air museum (also frequently open air museum) is a type of museum that exhibits collections of buildings and artifacts out-of-doors. They are also frequently known as museums of buildings or folk museums. The concept of an open-air museum originated in Scandinavia in the late 19th century and spread widely. A c ... Read »


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    • Ophel

    • The Ophel (Hebrew: עופל‎‎), also Graecised to Ophlas, the biblical name apparently given to a certain part of a settlement or city that is elevated from its surroundings, probably means fortified hill or risen area. In the Hebrew Bible the Ophel refers to a specific part in two cities: the extende ... Read »


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    • Opus (architecture)

    • In architecture, the latin term opus is a word that generically indicates various techniques of constructing buildings that were in use in ancient Rome. Usually the word opus is not used alone in building descriptions, but is paired with specific attributes (incertum, latericium, etc.), whose purpose is to show precise ... Read »


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    • Opus gallicum

    • The opus gallicum (Latin for "Gallic work") was a technique of construction whereby precise holes were created in stone masonry for the insertion of wooden beams to create a wooden infrastructure. The technique was so named because, though its presence is attested in protohistoric times, its use was common enough in Ga ... Read »


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    • Ottonian architecture

    • Ottonian Architecture is an architectural style which evolved during the reign of Emperor Otto the Great. The style was found in Germany and lasted from the mid 10th century until the mid 11th century. Ottonian architecture draws its inspiration from Carolingian and Byzantine architecture. Apart from some examples inf ... Read »


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    • Outline of classical architecture

    • The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to classical architecture: Classical architecture – architecture of classical antiquity, that is, ancient Greek architecture and the architecture of ancient Rome. It also refers to the style or styles of architecture influenced by those. For ex ... Read »


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    • Palladian architecture

    • Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from and inspired by the designs of the Venetian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). That which is recognised as Palladian architecture today is an evolution of Palladio's original concepts. Palladio's work was strongly based on the symmetry, pe ... Read »


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    • Parabolic arch

    • A parabolic arch is an arch, shaped like a parabola. While a parabolic arch may look "close" to a catenary arch, the parabola and the catenary are different curves: Parabola (red) graphed against a catenary (blue), view to simulate an arch. Parabola (red) graphed against a catenary (blue), view to simulate an arc ... Read »


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    • Pevsner Architectural Guides

    • The Pevsner Architectural Guides are a series of guide books to the architecture of the British Isles. Begun in the 1940s by the art historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, the 46 volumes of the original Buildings of England series were published between 1951 and 1974. The series was then extended to Scotland, Wales and Irelan ... Read »


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    • Ponce Creole

    • Ponce Creole is an architectural style created in Ponce, Puerto Rico, in the late 19th and early 20th century. This style of Puerto Rican buildings is found predominantly in residential homes in Ponce that developed between 1895 and 1920. Ponce Creole architecture borrows heavily from the traditions of the French, the ... Read »


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    • PrairieMod

    • PrairieMod is an emerging 21st century lifestyle based on ten principles recognized and used by some of history's most influential designers; Gustav Stickley, Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Neutra, Charles and Ray Eames, John Lautner and E. Fay Jones to name a few. The ten principles include Consider the Cost, Form is Fun ... Read »


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    • Pre-Romanesque art and architecture

    • Pre-Romanesque art and architecture is the period in European art from either the emergence of the Merovingian kingdom in about 500 CE or from the Carolingian Renaissance in the late 8th century, to the beginning of the 11th century Romanesque period. The term is generally used in English only for architecture and monu ... Read »


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    • Prodigy house

    • Prodigy house is a term for large and showy English Tudor and Jacobean houses built by courtiers and other wealthy families, either "noble palaces of an awesome scale" or "proud, ambitious heaps" according to taste. The prodigy houses stretch over the periods of Tudor, Elizabethan, and Jacobean architecture, though th ... Read »


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    • Pulhamite

    • Pulhamite was a patented anthropic rock 'material' invented by James Pulham (1820–98) of the firm James Pulham and Son of Broxbourne. Pulhamite, which usually looked like gritty sandstone, was used to join natural rocks together or crafted to simulate natural stone features. It was so realistic that it fooled som ... Read »


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    • Renaissance architecture

    • Renaissance architecture is the architecture of the period between the early 14th and early 17th centuries in different regions of Europe, demonstrating a conscious revival and development of certain elements of ancient Greek and Roman thought and material culture. Stylistically, Renaissance architecture followed Gothi ... Read »


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    • Revivalism (architecture)

    • Revivalism in architecture is the use of visual styles that consciously echo the style of a previous architectural era. Modern-day revival styles can be summarized within New Classical Architecture, and sometimes under the umbrella term traditional architecture. Architectrue at East Asia is regionally unique. Th ... Read »


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    • The Road to Oxiana

    • The Road to Oxiana is a travelogue by Robert Byron, first published in 1937. It is considered by many modern travel writers to be the first example of great travel writing. The word "Oxiana" in the title refers to the region along Afghanistan's northern border. The book is an account of Byron's ten-month journey to th ... Read »


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    • Rock-cut architecture

    • Rock-cut architecture is the creation of structures, buildings, and sculptures, by excavating solid rock where it naturally occurs. Rock-cut architecture is designed and made by man from the start to finish. In India and China, the terms 'cave' and 'cavern' are often applied to this form of man-made architecture. Howev ... Read »


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    • Rococo architecture

    • Rococo (/rəˈkoʊkoʊ/ or /roʊkəˈkoʊ/), less commonly roccoco, or "Late Baroque", is an early to late French 18th-century artistic movement and style, affecting many aspects of the arts including painting, sculpture, architecture, interior design, decoration, literature, music, and theatre. It deve ... Read »


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    • Rohanpur Octagonal Tomb

    • Rohanpur Octagonal Tomb

      Rohanpur Octagonal Tomb is located in the village of Naoda, which is far from about three kilometres to the northeast of the Rohanpur Railway station, in the Nawabganj district. In this Rohanpur-Nauda area this building is the only extant monument. The adjoining villages of Pirpur, Bhagalpur, Prasadpur and Qasba, staye ... Read »


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    • Roman Architectural Revolution

    • The Roman Architectural Revolution, also known as the concrete Revolution, was the widespread use in Roman architecture of the previously little-used architectural forms of the arch, vault, and dome. For the first time in history, their potential was fully exploited in the construction of a wide range of civil engineer ... Read »


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    • Roman concrete

    • Roman concrete, also called opus caementicium, was a material used in construction during the late Roman Republic until the fading of the Roman Empire. Roman concrete was based on a hydraulic-setting cement. Recently, it has been found that it materially differs in several ways from modern concrete which is based on Po ... Read »


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    • Romanesque Revival architecture in the United Kingdom

    • Romanesque Revival architecture, Norman Revival architecture or Neo-Norman styles of building were inspired by the Romanesque Architecture of the 11th and 12th centuries A.D. In the United Kingdom it started to appear as an architectural style in the 18th. century but reached its greatest popularity in the mid to latt ... Read »


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    • Russian architecture

    • Russian architecture follows a tradition whose roots were established in the Eastern Slavic state of Kievan Rus'. After the fall of Kiev, Russian architectural history continued in the principalities of Vladimir-Suzdal, Novgorod, the succeeding states of the Tsardom of Russia, the including architecture). The great chu ... Read »


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    • Rustication (architecture)

    • In classical architecture rustication is a range of masonry techniques giving visible surfaces a finish that contrasts in texture with the smoothly finished, squared-block masonry surfaces called ashlar. The visible face of each individual block is cut back around the edges to make its size and placing very clear. In a ... Read »


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    • San Buenaventura Conservancy

    • The San Buenaventura Conservancy is an historic preservation organization in Ventura, California also known by its early name of San Buenaventura. It works to recognize and revitalize historic, archeological and cultural resources in the region. The Conservancy is a membership based historic preservation non-profit 501 ... Read »


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    • Santa Maria Catholic Church

    • Santa Maria Catholic Church is located in old Frankish neighborhood, Passport district, and opened for worship in 1689. When the church was damaged from fire, it was built again in 1890. Church was made in honor of the Virgin Mary. There have been missionaries in Izmir since 14th century. A climate of tolerance in Izmi ... Read »


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    • SAVE Britain's Heritage


    • School of Restoration Arts at Willowbank


    • Architectural sculpture

    • Architectural sculpture is the term for the use of sculpture by an architect and/or sculptor in the design of a building, bridge, mausoleum or other such project. The sculpture is usually integrated with the structure, but freestanding works that are part of the original design are also considered to be architectural s ... Read »


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    • Seljuk architecture

    • Seljuk architecture is the name given to architecture built during the time when the Seljuks ruled most of the Middle East and Anatolia between (11th - 13th Centuries). After the 11th century the Seljuks of Rum emerged from the Great Seljuk Empire developing their own architecture, though they were influenced and inspi ... Read »


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    • Simon House, Mount Eliza

    • Simon House is at 33 Daveys Bay Road, Mount Eliza in Melbourne, Australia. The house was constructed in the 1960s during the period of architectural experimentation on materiality and structure in houses. Simon House was the first project received on the day when Guilford Bell and Neil Clerehan opened their office in S ... Read »


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    • Slide library

    • A slide library is a library that houses a collection of photographic slides, either as a part of a larger library or standing alone within a larger organization, such as an academic department of a college or university, a museum, or a corporation. Typically, a "slide library" contains slides depicting artwork, archit ... Read »


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    • Slovak Radio Building

    • Slovak Radio Building

      The Building of Slovak radio is a building in Bratislava. It is shaped like an inverted pyramid. Architects of this project were Å tefan Svetko, Å tefan Ďurkovič and Barnabáš Kissling and it was completed in 1983. The project began in 1967. The building is 80 metres high and has a concert hall with a l ... Read »


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    • Society for the National Heritage of Iran

    • Society for the National Heritage of Iran (Persian: انجمن آثار ملی ایران‎‎ "anjoman asar-e meli") or "SNH" for short, was a grass root political and archeological group created by a group of educated, and nationalistic Iranians in 1922, toward the end of the ... Read »


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    • The Society for the Preservation of Historic Buildings

    • The Society for the Preservation of Historic Buildings of the United Kingdom was founded initially as a pressure group to counter the demolition of historic buildings and it resolved later to acquire historically significant properties in order to maintain and protect them itself. In a 2007 merger, the goodwill of the ... Read »


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    • Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings

    • The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) (sometimes known as Anti-Scrape) is an amenity society founded by William Morris, Philip Webb and others, in 1877, to oppose what they saw as destructive "restoration" of ancient buildings then occurring in Victorian England; "ancient" being used in the wider s ... Read »


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    • Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain

    • The Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain (SAHGB) is a United Kingdom learned society for people interested in the history of architecture. The Society exists to encourage interest in the history of architecture, to enable the exchange and discussion of ideas related to this. The Society has no offi ... Read »


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    • Spitalfields Historic Buildings Trust

    • The Spitalfields Historic Buildings Trust, also known as the Spitalfields Trust, is a British architectural conservation charity. It originated in the Spitalfields area of London, although it also operates elsewhere in England and Wales. The trust's founders include the architectural historians Mark Girouard and Colin ... Read »


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    • Term (architecture)

    • In Classical architecture a term or terminal figure (plural: terms or termini) is a human head and bust that continues as a square tapering pillar-like form. The name derives from Terminus, the Roman god of boundaries and boundary markers. If the bust is of Hermes as protector of boundaries in ancient Greek culture, w ... Read »


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    • Tomb of Ferdowsi

    • Tomb of Ferdowsi

      Tomb of Ferdowsi (Persian: آرامگاه فردوسی‎‎) is a tomb complex composed of a white marble base, and a decorative edifice erected in honor of this Persian poet located in Tus, Iran, in Razavi Khorasan province. It was built in the early 1930s, under the Reza Shah, and use ... Read »


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    • Treatise

    • A treatise is a formal and systematic written discourse on some subject, generally longer and treating it in greater depth than an essay, and more concerned with investigating or exposing the principles of the subject. Treatises have been written by various philosophers: ... Read »


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    • Trilithon

    • A trilithon (or trilith) is a structure consisting of two large vertical stones (posts) supporting a third stone set horizontally across the top (lintel). It is commonly used in the context of megalithic monuments. The most famous trilithons are those of Stonehenge in England, those found in the Megalithic temples of M ... Read »


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    • Tutte l'opere d'architettura et prospetiva


    • Beverley Ussher

    • Beverley Ussher (born Melbourne 1868; died Melbourne, 9 June 1908) was articled to Melbourne architect Alfred Dunn. Dunn was English and had worked for architect Alexander Lauder in Barnstaple, Devon, where he worked with Arts and Crafts movement theorist and practitioner W.R. Lethaby. Through Dunn's English connection ... Read »


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    • Venice Charter

    • The Venice Charter for the Conservation and Restoration of Monuments and Sites is a set of guidelines, drawn up in 1964 by a group of conservation professionals in Venice, that provides an international framework for the conservation and restoration of historic buildings. The development of new conservation and re ... Read »


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    • Victorian architecture

    • Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era, during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed ... Read »


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    • Vihara

    • Vihara (विहार, vihāra) is the Sanskrit and Pali term for a Buddhist monastery. It originally meant "a secluded place in which to walk", and referred to "dwellings" or "refuges" used by wandering monks during the rainy season. The northern Indian state of Bihar derives its name from the word ... Read »


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    • Villa

    • A villa was originally an ancient Roman upper-class country house. Since its origins in the Roman villa, the idea and function of a villa have evolved considerably. After the fall of the Roman Republic, villas became small farming compounds, which were increasingly fortified in Late Antiquity, sometimes transferred to ... Read »


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    • Villa rustica

    • Villa rustica (countryside villa) was the term used by the ancient Romans to denote a villa set in the open countryside, often as the hub of a large agricultural estate (latifundium). The adjective rusticum was used to distinguish it from an urban or resort villa. The villa rustica would thus serve both as a residence ... Read »


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    • Visigothic art and architecture

    • The Visigoths entered Hispania (modern Spain and Portugal) in 415, and they rose to be the dominant people there until the Moorish invasion of 711 brought their kingdom to an end. This period in Iberian art is dominated by their style. Visigothic art is generally considered in the English-speaking world to be a strain ... Read »


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    • Voussoir

    • A voussoir /vuˈswɑːr/ is a wedge-shaped element, typically a stone, used in building an arch or vault. Although each unit in an arch or vault is a voussoir, two units are of distinct functional importance: the keystone and the springer. The keystone is the center stone or masonry unit at the apex of an arch. ... Read »


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    • Waterfront Historic Area League

    • The Waterfront Historic Area LeaguE, also known as WHALE, is a non-profit historic preservation organization located in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Its mission is: "to promote the value and reuse of greater New Bedford's historic structures through preservation, education and advocacy". The organization often promotes ... Read »


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    • Waterleaf (architecture)

    • In architecture, a waterleaf is a distinctive sculptural motif used on the capitals of columns and pillars in European buildings during the late twelfth century. It is a highly simplified plant motif, characteristic of the "late Norman" style of Romanesque architecture. A waterleaf capital is formed of broad, smooth l ... Read »


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    • Weighted catenary

    • A weighted catenary is a catenary curve, but of a special form. A "regular" catenary has the equation for a given value of a. A weighted catenary has the equation and now two constants enter: a and b. A catenary arch has a uniform thickness. However, if it becomes more complex. A weighted catenary is needed. N ... Read »


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    • West Adams Heritage Association

    • West Adams Heritage Association

      Founded in 1983, the West Adams Heritage Association (WAHA) is an historic preservation organization in Los Angeles, California that is focused on the preservation of the Historic West Adams section of the city. As stated on their website: "West Adams is located just south and west of Downtown and contains the city's ... Read »


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    • Wilhelmine Ring (Berlin)

    • The Wilhelmine Ring is the name for a belt of distinctive multi-occupancy rental housing blocks constructed in the second half of the 19th century around the historic city center of Berlin. It is characterized by a dense settlement pattern with four- to five-story residential buildings with side and rear wings around a ... Read »


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    • World's littlest skyscraper


    • Worldport (Pan Am)

    • Worldport (Pan Am)

      Terminal 3, also known by the trademarked name Worldport, was an airport terminal built by Pan American World Airways (Pan Am) in 1960 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, New York, United States. It opened on May 24, 1960 and ceased operations on May 24, 2013; it was demolished in late 2013. The te ... Read »


      Wikipedia
    Wikipedia
  • What Else?

    • Architectural history

Extras